Map

The overlays that highlight 17th century London features are approximate and derived from:

Summary

About 60 miles north-west of London, and two miles south-west of Huntingdon, close to the then residence of Lord Sandwich. Samuel Pepys’ uncle, Robert Pepys, lived there and on his death in 1661 the house passed to Pepys’ father. Samuel was due to inherit the property and dreamed of retiring there, but although he stayed there several times, he never lived there.

8 Annotations

Emilio  •  Link

From "The Monuments of Huntingdonshire" HMSO 1926
(at http://www.pepys.info/bramho.html , along with a history of the house from the L&M Companion. Thanks Glyn for the link.)

Pepys Farm, house, on the South side of the road from Brampton to Huntingdon, 400 yards NE of the church, is of two storeys with attics. The walls are partly of plastered timber-framing and partly of brick; the roofs are tiled. The timber-framed North part of the house was built in the middle of the 16th century and to this was added, early in the 18th century, the brick wing on the south. There is a modern addition to the west of this wing.

The original block has 18th century brick walls to the ground storey and a plaster cove to the eaves.

The west room and the room above it have 17th century windows with solid oak frames and mullions and iron casements.

The central chimney stack has three grouped shafts and there is another stack at the west end; both are of the 17th century.

The gables at the east and west of the original block have moulded barge-boards. The early 18th century addition is of red brick with a chimney stack of the same date.

Inside the building, the original block has chamfered ceiling beams and two rooms have open timbered ceilings.

In the west room on the ground floor are some pieces of 17th century panelling.

The first floor has some cambered beams in the walls and partitions and one fireplace has a cambered lintel. In the attics are two old battened doors.

Pedro.  •  Link

Buckden (near Brampton and mentioned in Uncle Robert's will).

Two factors helped shape the character of the village. The first was Buckden Palace that was the residence of the Bishop of Lincoln and would have provided many of the villagers with employment and interest down the ages. The second was the Great North Road that used to run through the middle of the village. It was an established main road from London to the North at the time of the Conquest (and, of course, the one used by the Bishops of Lincoln; hence their palace).
Also for a mention of Sam see--
http://www.buckden-village.co.uk/history/index.htm

Pedro.  •  Link

Brampton (Port Holme Meadows)

From the "Nature Atlas of Great Britain"
Dry/Wet meadow.
The river Ouse forks to run either side of this remarkable ancient meadow. It has been managed for hay in much the same way for centuries, allowing a wonderful range of wild flowers to prosper.
The footpaths, one of which runs along a route used by nuns at Hinchingbrooke, first cross dry meadow grassland characterised by lady's bedstraw, great burnet and pepper-saxifrage. In mid-summer the distinctive sound of yellow rattle seed heads will be heard as you brush past them. Wetter, lower lying parts in the middle have tubular water-dropwort, meadowsweet and marsh ragwort.
The river supports dragonflies including the scarce chaser. May and June are the best.
Flowers include fritillary, great yellow-cress, and meadow cranesbill. Birds include the corn bunting.

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Brampton – in Huntingdonshire, England – is a village near Godmanchester south west of Huntingdon. Brampton has been variously known as: Brantune (11th century), Brantone, Bramptone (12th-13th century), Brauntone, Brampton (13th century)

Brampton has a long history and is mentioned in the Domesday Book: there was a church and priest at Brampton in 1086. The Church of St Mary Magdalene or St Mary the Virgin (as it was once called), consists of a chancel with a north vestry, nave, north aisle, south aisle, west tower and north and south porches. This church is mentioned in the Domesday survey of 1086, but, with the exception of a few parts dating from the 12th century, no part of the current structure is earlier than the 14th century.

At one time the higher part of Brampton parish was forest but there are now less than 300 acres (1.2 km2) of woodland. Brampton is generally low-lying, mostly being about 33 feet (10 m) above sea-level, although the ground rises towards the south west boundary where it reaches 164 feet (50 m).

Brampton is associated with Samuel Pepys and legend has it that his fortune is buried somewhere in the village Brampton was the home of his uncle, Robert Pepys, elder brother of the diarist's father; his house still stands in the village. Samuel Pepys was known to have stayed there and at the Black Bull Inn in the village.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brampton,_Cambrid...

Terry Foreman  •  Link

BRAMPTON

Brantune (xi cent.); Brantone, Bramtone (xii-xiii cent.); Braunton, Brampton (xiii cent.).

The parish of Brampton adjoins Huntingdon on the south-west, and comprises an area of 3,557 acres, 30 of which are covered with water. The soil is gravel and the subsoil clay. The greater part of the parish is grass land, and the arable land produces cereals and roots. Formerly the higher part of the parish was forest, but there are now only some 300 acres of woodland. The River Ouse forms the eastern and south-eastern boundary and the Alconbury Brook forms the northern boundary. Another brook, which rises about the middle of the parish, flows eastward through the parish to the Ouse. The land between the two brooks and that adjoining the Ouse is low lying, being about 33 ft. above the Ordnance datum, but the ground rises towards the southwest boundary, where it reaches 164 ft. The Great North Road forks as it enters the parish from St. Neots on the south, throwing off a branch road northeast which joins the Huntingdon to Thrapston road at Bell End, a little north of Brampton village. The Huntingdon to Thrapston road passes through the parish, crossing the Great North Road about a mile north-west of the village of Brampton. At the crossing stands an inn now called Brampton Hut, but formerly known as Creamer's Hut, well known in the coaching days.

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/hunts/vol3...

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References

Chart showing the number of references in each month of the diary’s entries.

1661

1662

1663

1664

1665

1666

1667

1668