Annotations and comments

Terry Foreman has posted 9185 annotations/comments since 28 June 2005.

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About Vittoria Corombona (John Webster)

Terry Foreman   Link to this

The White Devil is a revenge tragedy by English playwright John Webster (1580–1634).

The story is loosely based on an event in Italy thirty years prior to the play's composition: the murder of Vittoria Accoramboni in Padua on 22 December 1585. Webster's dramatisation of this event turned Italian corruption into a vehicle for depicting "the political and moral state of England in his own day", particularly the corruption in the royal court.

The play explores the differences between the reality of people and the way they depict themselves as good, "white", or pure. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_White_Devil

About Vittoria Corombona (John Webster)

Terry Foreman   Link to this

The White Devil is a revenge tragedy by English playwright John Webster (1580–1634). According to Webster's own preface to the 1612 Quarto Edition, the play's first performance in that year was a notorious failure; he complained that the play was acted in the dead of winter before an unreceptive audience. The play's complexity, sophistication, and satire made it a poor fit with the repertory of Queen Anne's Men at the Red Bull Theatre, where it was first performed. It was successfully revived in 1630 by Queen Henrietta's Men at the Cockpit Theatre and published again in 1631.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_White_Devil

About Thursday 1 January 1662/63

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"... a true and allowable tragedy."

L&M remind us Pepys had been called on to define an allowable tragedy 1 September 1660 when he "dined at the Bullhead upon the best venison pasty that ever I eat of in my life, ....[and there] rose in discourse at table a dispute between Mr. Moore and Dr. Clerke, the former affirming that it was essential to a tragedy to have the argument of it true, which the Doctor denied, and left it to me to be judge, and the cause to be determined next Tuesday morning at the same place, upon the eating of the remains of the pasty, and the loser to spend 10s."
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1660/09/

And on Tuesday the 4th, "so to the Bullhead, where we had the remains of our pasty, where I did give my verdict against Mr. Moore upon last Saturday’s wager, where Dr. Fuller coming in do confirm me in my verdict." http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1660/09/04/

About Saturday 1 September 1660

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"Here rose in discourse at table a dispute between Mr. Moore and Dr. Clerke, the former affirming that it was essential to a tragedy to have the argument of it true, which the Doctor denied, and left it to me to be judge, and the cause to be determined next Tuesday morning at the same place, upon the eating of the remains of the pasty, and the loser to spend 10s." And so, on the 4th instant, Pepys's verdict: http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1660/09/04/

About Wednesday 31 December 1662

Terry Foreman   Link to this

L&M confirm Henry B. Wheatley.'s transcription here: there is no "weed" in this text. There is a older "wedded from":

Enter Horatio's Page.
Pa[ge]. I bring your honor comfortable newes; Your sonne's return'd from Pisa.
Fer[neze]. A comes ill,
And yet I hope his blest arriue will kill
This monster griefe.
Hor[atio]. He is a toward Prince.
Fer. Toward inough, and yet most strangely wean'd
And wedded from this world's societie.

The Plays of John Day, Part 4, p. 9:
LAW-TRICKES OR, WHO WOVLD HAVE THOVGHT IT.
As it hath bene diuers times Acted by the Children of the Reuele.
LONDON Printed for Richard More,and are to be solde at his Shop in S.Dunstanes Church-yard in Fleetestreete. 1608
http://books.google.com/books?id=l6QNAAAAQAAJ&p...

The idiom seems to mean one leaves due to being joined ("wedded") to another person or point of view.

About Dr Timothy Clarke

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Timothy Clarke (died 1672) was an English physician.
Clarke had some celebrity in his day as an anatomist. He enjoyed the favour of Charles II, before whom, as Samuel Pepys records, he conducted some dissections, ‘with which the king was highly pleased’. He had already (December 1660) been chosen physician in ordinary to the royal household
Clarke was one of the original Fellows of the Royal Society, and is named in the charter one of the first council. He wrote a long Latin dissertation in the Philosophical Transactions of 1668 (iii. 672–82), in which he tries to prove that Dr. George Joyliffe was the first discoverer of the lymphatic vessels. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timothy_Clarke

About Monday 29 December 1662

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"I have almost found out a young gentlewoman for my turn, to wait on my wife, of good family and that can sing."

Mary Ashwell. (L&M note) http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/5783/

About Monday 29 December 1662

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"the great vast trade of the goldsmiths in supplying the King with money at dear rates."

They usually charged 6% (the legal maximum), to which was added a gratuity of 4%, (L&M note)

About Louis Hérault

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Louis Hérault, minister of the Huguenot church, Threadneedle St, until 1675. (L&M note)

About Thursday 14 March 1660/61

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Bill's annotation cites an institutional but not a structural continuity up to the 1890's.
http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/2349/#c5...