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Terry Foreman has posted 9194 annotations/comments since 28 June 2005.

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About Monday 26 January 1662/63

Terry Foreman   Link to this

dirk's "spoiler" of Pepys's visit to the studio of Simon Pietersz Verelst 11 April 1669

"But by accident [ 'Jan Looten, the landscape-drawer, a Dutchman, living in St. James’s Market' ] did direct us to a painter that was then in the house with him, a Dutchman, newly come over, one Evarelst, who took us to his lodging close by, and did shew us a little flower-pot of his doing, the finest thing that ever, I think, I saw in my life; the drops of dew hanging on the leaves, so as I was forced, again and again, to put my finger to it, to feel whether my eyes were deceived or no. He do ask 70l. for it: I had the vanity to bid him 20l.; but a better picture I never saw in my whole life; and it is worth going twenty miles to see it. " http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1669/04/11/

About Friday 23 January 1662/63

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"and here much discourse, but little to be learned, but of a design in the north of a rising, which is discovered, among some men of condition, and they sent for up."

A group of alleged conspirators had just been arrested in Yorkshire, among them Luke Robinson (who had sat for several Yorkshire constituencies since 1640), two members of the Lascelles family, Capt. Matthew Beckwith, Richard Cholmeley and Thomas Dickenson, Alderman of York. (L&M note)

About Friday 23 January 1662/63

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"Mr. Grant...did fully make it out that the trade of England is as great as ever it was, only in more hands; and that of all trades there is a greater number than ever there was, by reason of men taking more ‘prentices, because of their having more money than heretofore."

Graunt had recently noted in his 'Natural and political observations made upon the bills of mortality' (1662, pp. 42 +)
[ http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/8786/ ] that population was increasing (despite the common view to the contrary), and that the increase was particularly great in the towns. (L&M note)

About Sunday 11 January 1662/63

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"a pitifull sermon of the young Scott"

Pepys suffered much from this young preacher, who served St Olave's sometimes for about a year from October 1662, and for Pepys always disastrously: e.g. "the Scott preached and I slept most of the afternoon.'' http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1663/10/25/ He is never named in the diary, and his identity can only be conjectured. (L&M note) "It is possible that he was the Alexander Mill, M.A., who received his preacher's license in Aug. 1662. An Alexander Milne took his M.A. at Aberdeen in 1658." (Companion, p. 393)

About Monday 12 January 1662/63

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"Lawson’s description of Tangier and the place for the Mole,1 of which he brought a very pretty draught. Concerning the making of the Mole, Mr. Cholmely did also discourse very well, having had some experience in it."

Lawson was one of the contractors for the mole's construction; Hugh Cholmley (who had built Whitbey pier) the principal engineer. (L&M note)

"Whitby's harbour piers used to protect the fishing fleet which has declined but they're still a great tourist attraction.
Whitby Abbey has got to be the pinnacle of tourist attractions in the town, but probably coming a close second at the twin harbour piers which were first mentioned in 1545 when they were at that time timber construction.

"In 1632 they were rebuilt using stone but still having a framework of timber and It is thought that the first pier was on the west side, with the east pier being built much later. A gentleman called Sir Hugh Cholmley took a great deal of interest in developing the harbour piers, but it took until 1702 for an act of Parliament to be granted for complete reconstruction of both [east and west] piers." http://www.endeavourcottage.co.uk/whitby-blog/w...

About St Catherine's Hill, Guildford

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Artington: Braboeuf Manor and Gardens

Braboeuf Manor, formerly part of the Manor of Artington and the Manor of Godalming, was the property of the same family for over 700 years, a rare occurrence. The first mention of the manor is c.900 AD, when the manor was a possession of King Alfred the Great. In 1171, the Crown granted the Manor to Master David of London for his services as envoy to the Pope in Rome in the negotiations that followed the murder of Thomas Beckett, Archbishop of Canterbury. In 1559, the Manor was held by Agnes, daughter of Joan and Robert Kemp, who married John Wight of London. The Manor remained in the the hands of the Wight family from 1559 to 1914. Samuel Pepys called on his uncle and aunt, the Wights, on August 8th 1668. The manor was purchased by The College of Law in 1964, which still own it today. http://www.exploringsurreyspast.org.uk/themes/p...

About Wednesday 7 January 1662/63

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"viewed old pay-books, and found that the Commanders did never heretofore receive any pay for the rigging time, but only for seatime, contrary to what Sir J. Minnes and Sir W. Batten told the Duke the other day."

Cf. Pepys to Coventry, 7 January: *Further Corr.*, pp. 2-5., Pepys had searched over 100 paybooks and proved that, until the First Dutch War, commanders (Mennes and Batten themselves included) had never been paid for the period when thei ships were being rigged. (L&M note)

About Wednesday 7 January 1662/63

Terry Foreman   Link to this

" and so to prayers and bed."

Is a reference to "prayers and bed" on a weekday anywhere else in the diary? Did Pepys dash this phrase off in a rush?

About Claracilla (Thomas Killigrew)

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Claricilla: A tragi-comedy, the scene Sicily
By Thomas Killigrew -- text can be read online via Google ebook
http://books.google.com/books?id=U11RAAAAcAAJ&p...

About Vittoria Corombona (John Webster)

Terry Foreman   Link to this

The White Devil is a revenge tragedy by English playwright John Webster (1580–1634).

The story is loosely based on an event in Italy thirty years prior to the play's composition: the murder of Vittoria Accoramboni in Padua on 22 December 1585. Webster's dramatisation of this event turned Italian corruption into a vehicle for depicting "the political and moral state of England in his own day", particularly the corruption in the royal court.

The play explores the differences between the reality of people and the way they depict themselves as good, "white", or pure. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_White_Devil