Annotations and comments

Terry Foreman has posted 12818 annotations/comments since 28 June 2005.

The most recent…


Comments

About Saturday 16 June 1660

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"Rose betimes and abroad in one shirt, which brought me a great cold and pain."

L&M: Until the widespread use of knitted underwear in the 19th century men customarily wore two shirts in cold,weather.

About Sunday 10 June 1660

Terry Foreman  •  Link

From Paul Brewster's first post:
"To Mr. Merstons"

The longhand is clear, but this must be Robert Mossom, whose Anglican services in the Savoy Pepys so often attended at this time with 'Monsieur Impertinent' (Butler). (L&M note)

About Friday 8 June 1660

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"At Chatham and Rochester the ships and bridge."

The greatest ships of the navy were at Chatham. The stone bridge over the Medway at Rochester (built c. 1392; rebuilt end 15th century; pulled down 1856) was generally held to be the most remarkable of English bridges. It had 11 arches and was 560 feet long. (Per L&M note)

About Friday 8 June 1660

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"Came to Canterbury...I saw the minster and the remains of Becket’s tomb."

Both the shrine (1220) and the old tomb (1170-1220) of Archbishop Becket had been destroyed at the Reformation. All that Pepys can have seen is there still -- the worn hollows around the site of the tomb made by the feet of pilgrins, in the Trinity Chapel. (Per L&M footnote)

Here are images of more than Pepys saw: the cathedral, simulations of Becket's tomb and a roughly contemporary view of the cathedral by Hollar.
https://www.google.com/search?q=canterbury+cath...'s+tomb

About Friday 8 June 1660

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"Came to Canterbury...I saw the minster and the remains of Becket’s tomb."

Both the shrine (1220) and the old tomb (1170-1220) of Archbishop Becket had been destroyed at the Reformation. All that Pepys can have seen is there still -- the worn hollows around the site of the tomb made by the feet of pilgrins, in the Trinity Chapel. (Per L&M footnote)

Here are images of more than Pepys saw: the cathedral, simulations of Becket's tomb and a roughly contemporary view of the cathedral by Hollar.
https://www.google.com/search?q=canterbury+cath...'s+tomp+hollar&imgrc=AucAfASRDysIIM:

About Wednesday 6 June 1660

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"That Sir. Ant. Cooper, Mr. Hollis, and Mr. Annesly, late President of the Council of State, are made Privy Councillors to the King."

All had been prominent rebels, but were Presbyterians and recent converts to a restoration. They were admitted to the Privy Council at the end of May, and later raised to the peerage. (L&M note)

About Gittern

Terry Foreman  •  Link

The cittern or cithren (Fr. cistre, It. cetra, Ger. zitter, zither, Sp. cistro, cedra, cítola) is a stringed instrument dating from the Renaissance. Modern scholars debate its exact history, but it is generally accepted that it is descended from the Medieval citole, or cytole. It looks much like the modern-day flat-back mandolin and the modern Irish bouzouki. Its flat-back design was simpler and cheaper to construct than the lute. It was also easier to play, smaller, less delicate and more portable. Played by all classes, the cittern was a premier instrument of casual music-making much as is the guitar today. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cittern

About Monday 4 June 1660

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Proclamation against debauched and profane persons, who, on pretence of regard to the King, revile and threaten others, or spend their time in taverns and tippling houses, drinking his health; ordering magistrates to be strict in discovering and punishing the same, Printed. [Proclamation Collection, Charles II., p. 3.] https://books.google.com/books?id=0_JVAAAAYAAJ&...