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Bill has posted 1681 annotations/comments since 9 March 2013.

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About Friday 7 February 1661/62

Bill  •  Link

"where a civitt cat, parrot, apes, and many other things are come from my Lord"

An APE, a Monkey. Also an Imitator or Mimick.
---An Universal Etymological English Dictionary. N. Bailey, 1675.

About Wednesday 5 February 1661/62

Bill  •  Link

"and drank some Rhenish wine and sugar"

From the Merchant of Venice:

There is more difference between thy flesh and hers than between jet and ivory; more between your bloods than there is between red wine and rhenish.

Therefore, for fear of the worst, I pray thee, set a deep glass of rhenish wine on the contrary casket, for if the devil be within and that temptation without, I know he will choose it.

About Tuesday 4 February 1661/62

Bill  •  Link

"speaking of the tarantula ... there are fidlers go up and down the fields every where, in expectation of being hired by those that are stung"

TARANTATI, those that are bit by the Tarantula.
TARANTISM, a Distemper arising from the Bite of a Tarantula.
TARANTULA, a venomous Ash-coloured Spider, speckled with little white and black, or red and green Spots, whose Bite is of such a Nature, that it is said to be cured by Musick.
---An Universal Etymological English Dictionary. N. Bailey, 1675.

About Sasse

Bill  •  Link

SASSE, in some of our statutes, denotes a kind of wear with flood-gates, commonly used in navigable rivers for the damming, and loosing the stream of water, as occasion requires for the better passing of boats and barges to and from. This in the west of England is called a Lock; in the river Lee, a Turn-pike, and in other places a Sluice.
---Cyclopaedia, Or an Universal Dictionary of Arts and Sciences. E. Chambers, 1743.

About Queenhithe

Bill  •  Link

Queenhithe, in Upper Thames Street, a short distance west of Southwark Bridge, a common quay for the landing of corn, flour, and other dry goods from the west of England,—originally called "Edred's hithe" or bank, from "Edred, owner thereof,"—but known, from a very early period as Ripa Reginae, the Queen's bank or Queenhithe, because it pertained unto the Queen. King John is said to have given it to his mother, Eleanor, Queen of Henry II. It was long the rival of Billingsgate, and would have retained the monopoly of the wharfage of London had it been below instead of above bridge. In the 13th century it was the usual landing-place for wine, wool, hides, corn, firewood, fish, and indeed all kinds of commodities then brought by sea to London, and the City Records afford minute details as to "the Customs of Queen-Hythe," and the tolls ordered to be taken there by Edward I.
---London, Past and Present. H.B. Wheatley, 1891.

About Wednesday 29 January 1661/62

Bill  •  Link

MISS [contracted of Mistress] a young Gentlewoman; also a kept Mistress, a Lady of Pleasure.
---An Universal Etymological English Dictionary. N. Bailey, 1675.

About Tuesday 28 January 1661/62

Bill  •  Link

"I found to be very silly as to matter of skill in shadows"

SILLY, simple, foolish.
---An Universal Etymological English Dictionary. N. Bailey, 1675.

About Tower Hill

Bill  •  Link

Tower hill, a very spacious area to the north, east and west of the Tower ditch, divided into Great and Little Tower hill. The west end extending much farther to the north is called by the former name, and the east end, in which is the victualling office, by the latter. It must be confessed that Tower hill has many handsome buildings, particularly among the row of houses which bound it to the west; but, though this great area might be rendered extremely beautiful, it is quite the reverse, in almost every other part besides that just mentioned, we find it ill built, and the ground a mere dunghill; particularly in little Towerhill, where we see either the backs of the houses next this fine area, or mean edifices in ruins. But as the hill is now improved and rendered more safe by placing strong wooden rails on the outside of the ditch, it is to be hoped that the ground will be completely levelled, and laid out to greater advantage, and that some care will be taken to rebuild the houses that are falling down, particularly as this is a place visited by all strangers.
---London and Its Environs Described. R. Dodsley, 1761.

About Hemp

Bill  •  Link

HEMP, a plant of great use in the arts and manufactories; furnishing thread, cloth, cordage, &c. Hemp, by naturalists called cannabis, bears a near analogy to flax; both in respect of form, culture, and use.
The plant is annual; that is, must be sown afresh every year. It rises quick, into a tall, slender sort of shrub, whose stem however is hollow, and big enough to be charr'd, and thus used in the composition of gunpowder. Its leaves arise by fives or sixes from the same pedicle, and are a little jagged; yielding a strong smell, which affects the head [!].
...
Hemp is of two kinds; male, popularly called karl; and female, or fimble. It is the male alone that produces seed, to perpetuate the kind; from the seed of the male arises both male and female.
---Cyclopaedia, Or an Universal Dictionary of Arts and Sciences. E. Chambers, 1743.

About Monday 3 March 1661/62

Bill  •  Link

FUMAGE, Hearth Money
---An Universal Etymological English Dictionary. N. Bailey, 1675.