Annotations and comments

Bill has posted 1428 annotations/comments since 9 March 2013.

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About Sunday 10 November 1661

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"Last night died Archibald, my Lady’s butler and Mrs. Sarah’s brother, of a dropsy"

A DROPSY, the Settlement of a watery Humour, either through the whole Body, or some Part of it.
---An Universal Etymological English Dictionary. N. Bailey, 1675.

There is also information at:
Other illnesses http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/330/

About Six Clerks' Office

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Six Clerks, are Officers of great Account, next in Degree to the Twelve Masters in Chancery, whose Office is to inroll Commissions, Pardons, Patents, Warrants, &c. that are pass'd the Great-Seal. They were anciently Clerici, and afterwards forfeited their Places if they did marry, till by Act of Parliament, in the time of Henry VIII. they were allowed to take Wives.
They are also Attorneys for Plaintiffs and Defendants in Causes depending in this Court.
Under the afore-nam'd Six Clerks, there were Sixty, now Ninety other Clerks, viz. Ten to each of the Six Clerks, and who, with their Under-Clerks, dispatch the Business of that Office. Some of these Ninety, do severally get four, five, or six hundred Pounds per Annum, or more.
---Magnæ Britanniæ Notitia. E. Chamberlayne, 1710.

About Thursday 7 November 1661

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(Whoops, sorry)

"we are resolved neither to meddle nor make with her"

Why do you meddle or make with him? Pourquoi vous prenez vous à lui?
---A short dictionary English and French. G. Miège, 1684.

About Thursday 7 November 1661

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"we are resolved neither to meddle nor make with her"

Why do you meddle or make with him? Pourquoi vous prenez à lui?
---A short dictionary English and French. G. Miège, 1684.

About 'Plague: Murder has a New Friend' by C.C. Humphreys

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Too bad there is no ebook version.

About Friday 13 September 1661

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(and a hundred years later)

This potato [the large red] is now much cultivated about London, the gentry in particular being very fond it. Perhaps they think it makes a figure on their table, on account of its colour: as to its taste, it does not exceed the pale-yellow potato, which is by many thought to be a sweeter root.
---Museum Rusticum Et Commerciale. 1764.

About Friday 13 September 1661

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Potatoes were perhaps not widely eaten, but 80 years is a long time...
---
The Use of all these Potato's
The Spanish Potato's are roasted under the embers, and being pared or peeled and sliced, are put into sacke with a little sugar, or without, and is delicate to be eaten.
They are used to be baked with Marrow, Sugar, Spice, and other things in Pyes, which are a daintie and costly dish for the table.
The Comfit makers preserve them and candy them as diuers things, and so ordered, is very delicate fit to accompany such other banquetting dishes.
The Virginia Potato's being dressed after all these waies before specified maketh almost as delicate meate as the former.
The Potato's of Canada are by reason of their great increasing, growne to be so common here with us at London that even the most vulgar begin to despise them, whereas when they were first received among us, they were dainties for a Queene.
---Paridisi In Sole Paradisus Terristris. J. Parkinson, 1629.

About Bezan

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The fleet had another addition this year [1661] in the Bezan, a small yacht; length of keel, 34 feet; breadth, 14 feet; depth, 7 feet; draught, 3 feet 6 inches; she came from Holland and was given to the King by the Dutch, but exactly by whom, is not recorded.
---The History of Yachting,1600-1815. Arthur Hamilton Clark, 1904.
http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_History_of_Ya..., p.66.

About Sunday 3 November 1661

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"did try to make a song in the praise of a liberall genius (as I take my own to be) to all studies and pleasures"

LIBERAL, bountiful, generous, also honourable, genteel.
GENIUS, a good or evil Angel or Spirit, supposed to attend upon every Person; also a Man's Nature, Fancy or Inclination.
---An Universal Etymological English Dictionary. N. Bailey, 1675.

This is another case where words have a much different meaning than they did 350 years ago. Sam is saying he has a "genteel Inclination" to all studies and pleasures, remembering that being liberal (i.e. honourable, genteel) was very important to him as he rose in the world.

About Sunday 3 November 1661

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"This day I stirred not out, but took physique ... a pullet hashed, which pleased me much to see my condition come to allow ourselves a dish like that"

I think the two phrases are related. A "physique," a purgative, that required a person to remain home all day must have been quite harsh. To be able to eat chicken at the end of that day would have been a relief.