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Bill has posted 2467 annotations/comments since 9 March 2013.

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About Codlin

Bill  •  Link

CODLIN, an Apple proper to be coddled or stewed
---An universal etymological English dictionary. N. Bailey, 1724.

About Waytes

Bill  •  Link

WAITS, a sort of wind music.
---An universal etymological English dictionary. N. Bailey, 1724.

About Sunday 26 July 1663

Bill  •  Link

“and then went out of the wood, and holloed Mr. Creed, and made him hunt me from place to place”

HALLOO, A word of encouragement when dogs are let loose on their game.
To HALLOO, To cry as after the dogs.
To HALLOO,
1 To encourage with shouts.
2 To chase with shouts.
3 To call or shout.
---A Dictionary Of The English Language. Samuel Johnson, 1756.

Halloo me like a hare.
---Coriolanus. W. Shakespeare

The use of hello as a telephone greeting has been credited to Thomas Edison; according to one source, he expressed his surprise with a misheard Hullo.
---Wikipedia

About Saturday 25 July 1663

Bill  •  Link

Goodman, bon homme. (C’est ainsi qu’on appele ordinairement les Fermiers & autres Paisans qui ont famille.) (It is what one commonly calls the farmers & other peasants who have a family.)
---A short dictionary English and French. G. Miège, 1684.

About Saturday 25 July 1663

Bill  •  Link

“there by direction of one goodman Arthur”

GOODMAN, a Country Appellation for a Master of a Family,
---An universal etymological English dictionary. N. Bailey, 1724.

About Joseph Hill

Bill  •  Link

HILL, JOSEPH (1625-1707), nonconformist divine and lexicographer: fellow of Magdalene College, Cambridge; M.A., 1649; his name removed for nonconformity, 1662; pastor of Scottish church at Middelburg, Holland, 1667-73, where he published pamphlet advocating English alliance; English presbyterian minister on Haringvliet, Rotterdam, 1678-1707; edited and enlarged Schrevelius's Greek-Latin lexicon, 1663.
---Dictionary of National Biography: Index and Epitome. S. Lee, 1906.

About Custards

Bill  •  Link

... Then make a good custard, and pour it over your pie. Make your custard thus. Boil a pint of cream with a stick of cinnamon, and sugar enough to make it a little sweet. As soon as it is cold, put in the yolks of four eggs well beaten, set it on the fire, and keep stirring it till it grows thick; but take care not to let it boil, as that will curdle it. Pour this into your pie, pair thin a little lemon, cut the peel like straws, and lay it on the top of your pies.
---The Accomplished Housekeeper, and Universal Cook. T. Williams, 1797.

About Cheesecake

Bill  •  Link

To make common Cheesecakes.
Beat eight eggs well, while a quart of milk is on the fire, and when it boils, put in the eggs, and stir them till they come to a curd. Then pour it out, and when it is cold, put in a little salt, two spoonfuls of rose-water, and three quarters of a pound of currants, well washed. Put it into puff-paste, and bake it. If you use tin patties to bake in, butter them, or you will not be able to take them out; but if you bake them in glass or china, only an upper crust will be necessary, as you will not want to take them out when you send them to table.
---The Accomplished Housekeeper, and Universal Cook. T. Williams, 1797.