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Bill has posted 2640 annotations/comments since 9 March 2013.

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About Jean d'Espagne

Bill  •  Link

D'ESPAGNE, JEAN (1591-1659), French protestant pastor and theologian; pastor at Orange, 1620; published 'Antiduello,' a discussion on the morality of the duel, 1632; pastor to a French congregation in London, which came to regard him as a schismatic.
---Dictionary of National Biography: Index and Epitome. S. Lee, 1906.

About Friday 19 February 1663/64

Bill  •  Link

“ Mr. Jaggard, a salter, in Thames Street,”

SALTER, one who deals in Salt or Salt Fish.
---An universal etymological English dictionary. N. Bailey, 1724.

So not surprising that Jaggard served a dinner of “all fish”.

About Wednesday 17 February 1663/64

Bill  •  Link

“both of whom are very witty men”

WITTY, full of wit.
WIT, One of the Faculties of the rational Soul, Genius, Fancy, aptness for any Thing, Cunningness.
---An universal etymological English dictionary. N. Bailey, 1724.

About Wednesday 17 February 1663/64

Bill  •  Link

“where I found an excellent mastiffe, his name Towser”

To TOUSE. To pull; to tear; to haul; to drag; whence touser.
---A Dictionary Of The English Language. Samuel Johnson, 1756.

About Monday 15 February 1663/64

Bill  •  Link

TORY, a Word first used by the Protestants in Ireland to signify those Irish common Robbers and Murderers who stood outlawed for Robbery and Murder; now a Nick name to such as call themselves High Church men, or to the Partisans of the Chevalier de St George.
---An Universal Etymological English Dictionary. N. Bailey, 1724

There is discussion of the word "tory" in the annotations of 25 Nov 1661 http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1661/11/25/

About Thursday 11 February 1663/64

Bill  •  Link

"my wife and I hand to fist to a very fine pig"

To drink hand to fist. Boire á tire-larigot. [To drink as much as one wants]
---The Royal Dictionary Abridged, French to English. A. Boyer, 1755

About Cotton's 'Scarronides, or, Le Virgile travesty'

Bill  •  Link

A travesty indeed. Compare:

I sing of warfare and a man at war.
From the sea-coast of Troy in early days
He came to Italy by destiny,
To our Lavinian western shore,
A fugitive, this captain, buffeted
Cruelly on land as on the sea
Robert Fitzgerald, 1983

I sing of arms and the man, he who, exiled by fate,
first came from the coast of Troy to Italy, and to
Lavinian shores – hurled about endlessly by land and sea
A.S. Kline, 2002

I sing the man (read it who list,
A Trojan true as ever pist,)
Who from Troy-town, by Wind and Weather
To Italy (and God knows whither)
Was packt, and wrackt, and lost, and tost,
And bounc'd from Pillar unto Post
Charles Cotton, 1664

About Monday 8 February 1663/64

Bill  •  Link

"I found he would have played the Jacke with me"

To play the Jack with one.
To attempt to domineer over one, I suppose, is here the intended sense.
---English Proverbs and Proverbial Phrases Collected from the Most Authentic Sources. J. Russell Smith, 1869.