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Bill has posted 1722 annotations/comments since 9 March 2013.

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About Wednesday 26 February 1661/62

Bill  •  Link

To CAST, to fling or throw; also to think or contrive
---An Universal Etymological English Dictionary. N. Bailey, 1675.

About Wednesday 26 February 1661/62

Bill  •  Link

@Clement above. I think SP's attempts to "cast up" accounts will indeed be a bit simple. It may be a bit of a spoiler alert but in a few months SP will make his "first attempt being to learn the multiplication-table".

About Sunday 23 February 1661/62

Bill  •  Link

"My cold being increased, I staid at home all day"

COLD.
3. A disease caused by cold; the obstruction of perspiration.
---A Dictionary Of The English Language. Samuel Johnson, 1756.

About Sunday 23 February 1661/62

Bill  •  Link

@Gerald, Aristotle (and Solon) in the Nicomachean Ethics got there first: "Must no one at all, then, be called happy while he lives; must we, as Solon says, see the end?"

About Act of Uniformity 1662

Bill  •  Link

The effect of these provisions of the Act of Uniformity was that a large number of the non-episcopal accepted the conditions imposed — that they should be episcopally ordained, accept the Prayer Book system as now set forth, and renounce the obligations into which they had entered for the destruction of Episcopacy, and for opposing the Crown by force of arms. These incumbents thus legalized their position, and qualified themselves to carry out the system of the Church of England according to its long-established principles. Those ministers who declined to accept these conditions and to "conform" to the Church system, and who were hence called "Nonconformists," amounted in number to about eight hundred; and on August 24, 1662, they were obliged by the provisions of the Act to vacate their benefices. Some of these established themselves as ministers of separate congregations of Presbyterians or Independents, or of some of the many other sects which were gradually formed among the remnant of the Puritans.
---The Reformation of the Church of England. J.H. Blunt, 1882

About Act of Uniformity 1662

Bill  •  Link

Sorry, the about section was from:
---A History of the English Episcopacy. T. Lathbury, 1886.

About Act of Uniformity 1662

Bill  •  Link

The book of common prayer, as revised by the convocation [the Savoy conference], was submitted to and approved by the parliament; and measures were immediately taken to secure its adoption throughout the country. On the 19th May, 1662, an act, called the Act of Uniformity, received the royal assent. It was enacted that it should come into operation on the 24th of the ensuing August. By this act every minister was compelled to subscribe to every thing contained in the book of common prayer. It was also enacted, that no minister should officiate in the church of England without episcopal ordination.
---The Reformation of the Church of England. J.H. Blunt, 1882

About Cookshops

Bill  •  Link

Even a colonial like me knows this:

takeaway
1. (chiefly UK, Australia and New Zealand, of food) To be eaten off the premises.
Synonyms
(to be eaten off premises): to go (North America)
http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/takeaway

About Friday 8 August 1662

Bill  •  Link

From Sean Adams above: "a man that cannot sit still in his chamber -- is not fit for business
The reference may to Pascal."

By coincidence, Blaise Pascal will die 11 days from today, in Paris.

About Ralph Mountagu

Bill  •  Link

MONTAGU, RALPH, first Duke of Montagu (1638?-1709), son of Edward Montagu, second baron Montagu of Boughton; master of the horse to the Duchess of York; ambassador extraordinary to Louis XIV, 1669; purchased the mastership of the great wardrobe, 1671; privy councillor, 1672; again ambassador extraordinary to Louis XIV, 1676; unsuccessfully intrigued for the post of secretary of state; being denounced by the Duchess of Cleveland, returned to England without permission, to find himself struck out of the privy council (1678) and superseded as ambassador; negotiated with the French ambassador, offering to procure Danby's fall within six months; his papers seized; produced two letters, which were voted as sufficient ground for Danby's impeachment, 1678; escaped arrest after the dissolution of parliament, 1678; unsuccessfully endeavoured to get Monmouth declared Prince of Wales; retired to France, 1680; succeeded as Baron Montagu, 1684, and returned to England on the accession of James II; took up William's cause at the revolution; privy councillor and created Viscount Monthermer and Earl of Montagu, 1689; the mastership of the wardrobe restored to him; several lawsuits concerning the Albemarle property caused by his marriage with Elizabeth Cavendish, widow of Christopher Monck, second duke of Albemarle, 1692; became Marquis of Monthermer and Duke of Montagu, 1705.
---Dictionary of National Biography: Index and Epitome. S. Lee, 1906.