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Bill has posted 1672 annotations/comments since 9 March 2013.

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New since your last visit

About Monday 3 March 1661/62

Bill  •  Link

FUMAGE, Hearth Money
---An Universal Etymological English Dictionary. N. Bailey, 1675.

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About Monday 17 February 1661/62

Bill  •  Link

the derivation of "Convertine":
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This ship [the Convertine], originally the Destiny, built for Sir Walter Ralegh [sic] before his last voyage, and afterwards bought or confiscated into the navy (E.H.R. vii. 486, n.63), and thus 'converted,' appears in the navy lists and the State Papers as the 'Convertive,' 500 tons and 30 guns. In 1648 she sailed to Holland with the rest of the ships that revolted against the Parliament (Cal. S.P. Dom. 1648-9, p.124). In the Commonwealth lists, however, there appears a 40-gun ship of 500 net and 666 gross tonnage named the Convertine, a prize of 1651 (E.H.R. xi. 46), probably the same ship retaken, but there is no doubt that the two names were used indifferently long before Commonwealth times. 'Convertine' is written in a State Paper as early as 1629 (S.P. Dom. vol.cxxxv. No.32).
---Publications of the Navy Records Society, v.7, p.379-380, 1896.

New since your last visit

About Monday 17 February 1661/62

Bill  •  Link

the derivation of "Convertine":
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In September, 1892, the following notice appeared in the journal "Notes and Queries." Although respondents mentioned Pepys' diary, the question received no answer.

Convertine : Convertive. - In the seventeenth century we had a ship of war whose name appears as Convertiue but whether the last letter but one is a u or an n is doubtful. It is printed indiscriminately v or n; Convertive or Convertine. Can some friendly reader suggest a meaning of the name which may perhaps determine the spelling? J.K. Laughton.
---
British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/ has many entries for ships with both names in the 17th century though "Convertive" appears almost exclusively in the early 1600s and the two names do not seem to overlap. Were they somehow related/linked? See my next note.

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About Saturday 25 January 1661/62

Bill  •  Link

"Sir W. Pen came to me, and did break a business to me about removing his son from Oxford to Cambridge to some private college."

Having left college, at his return home to the vice-admiral his father, instead of kneeling to ask his blessing, as is the custom with the English, he went up to him with his hat on, and accosted him thus; "Friend, I am glad to see thee in good health." The vice-admiral thought his son crazy; but soon discovered he was turned Quaker.
---The Works of M. de Voltaire. T.G. Smollett, 1762.

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About Friday 24 January 1661/62

Bill  •  Link

"there bought me a pair of scissars and a brass square"

A SQUARE, an Instrument used by Masons, Carpenters, &c. for squaring.
---An Universal Etymological English Dictionary. N. Bailey, 1675.

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About Thomas Jacombe

Bill  •  Link

JACOMBE, THOMAS (1622-1687), nonconformist divine; brother of Samuel Jacombe; fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, 1646; M.A., 1647; incumbent of St. Martin's, Ludgate Hill, London, 1647-62; a trier, 1659; commissioner for review of the prayer-book, 1661; imprisoned for holding conventicles in Silver Street, but protected by Countess-dowager of Exeter; published sermons.
---Dictionary of National Biography: Index and Epitome. S. Lee, 1906.

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About Saturday 15 February 1661/62

Bill  •  Link

"he is a very rogue"

VERY, truly, indeed, in reality.
---An Universal Etymological English Dictionary. N. Bailey, 1675.

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About Saturday 15 February 1661/62

Bill  •  Link

"Sir Nicholas Crisp’s sasse at Deptford"

SASSE, a Sluice or Lock, especially in a River that is cut with Floodgates to shut up or let out Water, for the better Passage of Boats and Barges.
---An Universal Etymological English Dictionary. N. Bailey, 1675.