Annotations and comments

Bill has posted 2580 annotations/comments since 9 March 2013.

The most recent…


Comments

About Thursday 3 December 1663

Bill  •  Link

“ sent me a Runlett of Tent”

TENT …
4. A species of wine deeply red, chiefly from Gallicia in Spain
---A Dictionary Of The English Language. Samuel Johnson, 1756.

About Thursday 3 December 1663

Bill  •  Link

“ sent me a Runlett of Tent”

RUNDLET, a small Cask for Liquors, from 3 to 20 Gallons.
---An universal etymological English dictionary. N. Bailey, 1724.

RUNDLET, A small barrel.
---A Dictionary Of The English Language. Samuel Johnson, 1756.

RUNDLET or RUNLET, a small vessel containing an uncertain quantity of any liquor from three to twenty gallons.
---The Complete Dictionary of Arts and Sciences. 1765.

About Tuesday 24 November 1663

Bill  •  Link

I like David G's suggestion from yesterday that insurance on this ship could be bought by anyone. "it seems one man, Middleburgh, did give 20 per cent. in gold last night" suggests to me that Middleburgh had no financial interest in the ship. Middleburgh took a gamble and lost.

About Monday 23 November 1663

Bill  •  Link

“This troubles me to think I should be so oversoon.”

OVERSOON, Too soon.
---A Dictionary Of The English Language. Samuel Johnson, 1756.

About Monday 16 November 1663

Bill  •  Link

"her great conflux of humours"

CONFLUX, a flowing together, as of Humours.
CONFLUXIBlLlTY, an aptness to flow together.
---An universal etymological English dictionary. N. Bailey, 1724.

About Blanch Appleton (or Blanche Chapiton)

Bill  •  Link

Blanch Appleton, in Aldgate Ward, was on the east side of Mark Lane near Fenchurch Street. Strype, 1720, describes it as "a large open square place, with a passage to it for carts, which is called Blanch Appleton Court, having pretty good timber houses, which are indifferently well inhabited. It hath a turning passage on the south side by an alley which encompasseth some of the houses." The name was derived from the manor of Blanch Appleton, which belonged in the reign of Richard II. to Sir Thomas Roos of Hamelake. It is enumerated (9th of Henry V.) in "The Partition of the Inheritance of Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Hereford and Essex," under the head of "London—Blaunchappulton." Hall, in his Chronicle (ed. 1548), writes it Blanchechapelton. In Strype's Map, 1720, it is given as Blanch Chaplin Court; the further corruption was into Blind Chapel Court, by which it appears to have been commonly known. The Common Council of London ordered, October 12, 1464, that "basket makers, gold wire-drawers, and other foreigners [i.e. persons not having the freedom of the City] using mysteries within the City, shall not henceforth hold shops within the liberty of the City, but only at Blanch Appulton, so as they might have sufficient dwelling there."
---London, Past and Present. H.B. Wheatley, 1891.

About John Rushworth

Bill  •  Link

RUSHWORTH (John), an English gentleman, and author of useful "Historical Collections," was of an ancient family, and born in Northumberland about 1607. He was a student in the university of Oxford; but left it soon, and entered himself of Lincoln's Inn, where he became a barrister. But, his humour leading him more to state-affairs than the common law, he began early to take, in characters or shorthand, speeches and passages at conferences in parliament, and from the king's own mouth what he spake to both houses; and was upon the stage continually an eye and ear witness of the greatest transactions. He also personally attended and observed all occurrences of moment, during eleven years interval of parliament from 1630 to 1640, in the star-chamber, court of honour, and exchequer-chamber, when all the judges of England met there upon extraordinary cases; and at the council-table, when great causes were tried before the king and council. And, when matters were agitated at a great distance, he was there also; and went on purpose out of curiosity to see and observe what was doing at the camp at Berwic, at the sight at Newborn, at the treaty of Rippon, and at the great council at York.
In 1640, he was chosen an assistant to Henry Elsynge, esq, clerk of the house of commons; by which means he became acquainted with the debates in the house, and privy to their proceedings. The house reposed such confidence in him, that they entrusted him with their weightiest affairs; particularly, in conveying messages and addresses to the king while at York: between which place and London, though 150 computed miles, be is said to have ridden frequently in twenty-four hours. In 1643, he took the covenant; and when Sir Thomas Fairfax, who was his near relation, was appointed general of the parliament forces, he was made his secretary; in which office he did great services to his master. In 1649, attending lord Fairfax to Oxford, he was created master of arts, as a member of Queen's college; and at the same time was made one of the delegates, to take into consideration the affairs depending between the citizens of Oxford and the members of that university. Upon lord Fairfax's laying down his commission of general, Rushworth went and resided for some time in Lincoln's Inn, and, being in much esteem with the prevailing powers, was appointed one of the committee, in Jan. 1651-2, to consult about the reformation of the common law. In 1658, he was chosen one of the burgesses for Berwic upon Tweed, to serve in the protector Richard's parliament: and was again chosen for the same place in the healing parliament, which met April 25, 1660.
After the Restoration, he presented to the king several of the privy-council's books, which he had preserved from ruin during the late distractions; but does not appear to have received any other reward than thanks ...
---A New and General Biographical Dictionary. W. Tooke, 1798.

About John Barclay

Bill  •  Link

BARCLAY, JOHN (1582-1621), author of the 'Argenis,' born at Pont-a-Mousson; perhaps educated by jesuits; lived in London, 1606-16, and in Rome, 1616-21; published 'Satyricon,' 1603-7, 'Sylvas ' (Latin poems). 1606, 'Icon Animorum,' 1614, and 'Argenis,' a Latin satire on political faction and conspiracy, 1621.
---Dictionary of National Biography: Index and Epitome. S. Lee, 1906.

About Monday 21 December 1663

Bill  •  Link

“Mrs. Owen, Captain Allen’s daughter, and causes me to stay while the papers relating to her husband’s place”

John Owen, who married a daughter of Captain John Alleyn, was Clerk of the Ropeyard at Chatham. Among the State Papers is a letter from him to Pepys, dated December 14th, asking for his warrant ("Calendar," Domestic, 1663-64, p. 373).
---Wheatley, 1893.