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Bill has posted 2617 annotations/comments since 9 March 2013.

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About Sir Thomas Vyner

Bill  •  Link

VINER, Sir THOMAS, baronet (1588-1665), lord mayor of London; came to London, 1600; brought up by Samuel Moore, goldsmith; alderman of London, 16461660, sheriff, 1648, lord mayor, 1653; knighted, 1654; created baronet, 1661; did much government banking business from James I's to Charles II's time; benefactor of the Goldsmiths' Company.
---Dictionary of National Biography: Index and Epitome. S. Lee, 1906.

About Tuesday 12 January 1663/64

Bill  •  Link

“did accost her alone, and spoke of his hoping she was with child”

To ACCOST, to approach, to draw near to, to make, come up to, or set upon a Person.
---An universal etymological English dictionary. N. Bailey, 1724.

About Monday 11 January 1663/64

Bill  •  Link

Terry says above: "the universal character" Pepys refers to may not mean what you might think.

He may indeed have been referring to John Wilkin's ideas (mentioned by SP in 1666 and published in 1668). But he may also have had this 1657 publication in mind:

[Cave] Beck is remembered for his book, "The Universal Character", published in London in 1657; it was also published the same year in French. The books's full title was "The Universal Character, by which all Nations in the World may understand one another's Conceptions, Reading out of one Common Writing their own Mother Tongues. An Invention of General Use, the Practise whereof may be Attained in two Hours' space, Observing the Grammatical Directions. Which Character is so contrived, that it may be Spoken as well as Written".

In his book Beck sought to invent a universal language that could be understood and used by anyone in the world, no matter what their mother tongue. It was based on the ten Arabic numerals, 0-9, which he proposed the following pronunciations:

1. Aun, 2. Too, 3. Tray, 4. For orfo, 5. Fai, 6. Sic, 7. Sen, 8. At, 9. Nin, 0. o.

The combinations of these characters, intended to express all the main words in any language, were to be arranged in numerical order, from zero to 10,000, which he considered sufficient to cover all words in general use.

---Wikipedia entry for Cave Beck. (1623–c.1706)

About Friday 8 January 1663/64

Bill  •  Link

“It is believed by many circumstances that his man is guilty of confederacy”

CONFEDERACY, CONFEDERATION, an Alliance between Princes and States, for their Defence against a Common Enemy; In Law, it is an uniting of Persons to do any unlawful Act.
To CONFEDERATE, to unite into a Confederacy, to combine, to plot together.
---An universal etymological English dictionary. N. Bailey, 1724.

About Henry Scobell

Bill  •  Link

SCOBELL, HENRY (d. 1660), clerk of the parliament: appointed for life, 1648; joint-licenser of newspapers and political pamphlets, 1649; assistant-secretary to council of state, 1653; published works on parliamentary procedure.
---Dictionary of National Biography: Index and Epitome. S. Lee, 1906.

About Sir Thomas Chamberlayne

Bill  •  Link

Eldest son of Sir Thomas Chamberlayne, Chief Justice of Chester. He was created a baronet in 1642.
---Wheatley, 1904.

About John Maitland (2nd Earl of Lauderdale)

Bill  •  Link

MAITLAND, JOHN, second Earl and first Duke of Lauderdale (1616-1682), grandson of Sir John Maitland; grand-nephew of William Maitland of Lethington; regarded as a rising hope of the ultra-covenanting party; commissioner for the Solemn League and Covenant, 1643-6; one of the commissioners who obtained the famous 'Engagement'; with Charles II in Holland, 1649; followed him to Worcester and was taken prisoner, 1651; kept a prisoner till 1660; secretary for Scottish affairs, 1660-80; aimed at making the crown absolute in Scotland both in state and church; had complete influence over Charles; created Duke of Lauderdale and Marquis of March in the Scottish peerage, 1672; placed upon the commission for the admiralty, 1673; made a privy councillor and a peer of England as Earl of Guildford and Baron Petersham, 1674: supported by Charles II against attacks from the English parliament.
---Dictionary of National Biography: Index and Epitome. S. Lee, 1906.

About Sunday 27 December 1663

Bill  •  Link

And also if one of "our" encyclopedia entries also has a link to a Wikipedia entry, I see no need to reproduce any of Wikipedia's information in an annotation. (Especially without attribution.)