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Bill has posted 2530 annotations/comments since 9 March 2013.

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About Edward Proger

Bill  •  Link

Edward Progers, younger son of Colonel Philip Progers, equerry to James I., was page to Charles I., and afterwards groom of the bedchamber to his son the Prince of Wales. He was banished from Charles II.'s presence in 1650 by an act of the estates of Scotland, "as an evil instrument and bad counsellor of the king." He died poor on January 1st, 1713-14, aged ninety-six. He is mentioned in the Grammont Memoirs as the confidant of the king's intrigues.
---Wheatley, 1893.

About Monday 26 October 1663

Bill  •  Link

“he was a man that had thus long kept out the Turke till now”

Leopold I., the Holy Roman Emperor, was born June 9th, 1640. He became King of Hungary in 1655, and King of Bohemia in 1658, in which year he received the imperial crown. The Princes of the German Empire watched for some time the progress of his struggle with the Turks with indifference, but in 1663 they were induced to grant aid to Leopold after he had made a personal appeal to them in the diet at Ratisbon.
---Wheatley, 1893.

About Friday 23 October 1663

Bill  •  Link

“ the young couple that was married yesterday, and he one of the Br[ide’s] men, a kinswoman (Brumfield) of the Joyces married to an upholster.”

"Philip Harman, of St. Michael, Cornhill, gent., bachelor, about 27, and Mary Bromfeild, of St. Sepulchre, London, spinster, about 20, consent of parents — at Little St. Bartholomew, London, 21 Oct., 1663" (Chester's "London Marriage Licences," ed. Foster, 1887, col. 627).
---Wheatley, 1893.

About Tuesday 13 October 1663

Bill  •  Link

"So it was carried to Mrs. Sarah’s husband’s”

Lord Sandwich's housekeeper appears to have been married to a cook, but we do not know his name, as his wife is always described as "Mrs. Sarah."
---Wheatley, 1893.

About Tuesday 13 October 1663

Bill  •  Link

"she answered, “Zounds!"

And this puts me in mind of taking notice here of other contracted Forms of Swearing that are us'd among us, as if there was no manner of Hurt or Evil in them. And such are these, 'Od or Ad, that is in short, By God; 'Od's Bud or 's Bud, that is short, By God's Blood; 'Od's Wounds or 'Swounds, that is, By God's Wounds;
---A letter to a friend, concerning the great sin of taking God's name in vain. E. Wells, 1714.

About Tuesday 13 October 1663

Bill  •  Link

“I begin to become costive and bound”

COSTIVE, Bound in the Belly.
---An universal etymological English dictionary. N. Bailey, 1724.

About Thomas Smith

Bill  •  Link

That information about Thomas Smith is from Wheatley, 1893. Sorry.

About Thomas Smith

Bill  •  Link

Thomas Smith, … Secretary of the Admiralty in 1638, about which time Sir George Carteret (then Captain Carteret) held the office of Comptroller of the Navy.
---Diary and correspondence of Samuel Pepys, the diary deciphered by J. Smith. 1854.

About Hypocras

Bill  •  Link

The wines of this period being more or less harsh and acid, it became customary to mix spices, sugar, and honey with them, which, under the name of 'piments,' were drunk as liqueurs now are. A banquet without piment would have wanted its greatest essential; indeed, it was considered such a luxury that the clergy were forbidden to taste it except on high holidays. The two favourite piments were hypocras and clarry. The first was made of red or white wine, mixed with ginger, cinnamon, grains, sugar, and turesoll, if intended for the nobility and gentry; common people being contented with ginger, long pepper, and clarified honey. It derived its name from being strained through a particular shaped bag called 'Hippocrates's sleeve.' Hypocras was drunk between the courses, or at the termination of the banquet, besides being often served with biscuits, only as a light morning-refection.
---Chambers's Journal, v.33. 1860.

About Hypocras

Bill  •  Link

This beverage was taken in France as a morning draught.—Southey's Common-Place Book.
---Diary and correspondence of Samuel Pepys, the diary deciphered by J. Smith. 1854.