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Bill has posted 1290 annotations/comments since 9 March 2013.

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About Thursday 29 August 1661

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" he being to go to Brampton (to settle things against my mother comes)"

In August, 1661, John Pepys retired to a small property at Brampton (worth about £80 per annum), which had been left to him by his eldest brother, Robert Pepys
---Wheatley, 1896.

About Wednesday 31 July 1661

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"was forced to borrow..."

On 24 May 1661 Sam said that he was "clearly worth 500l. in money." (And in September he will be "worth near 600l.") If he doesn't have 40l. in cash money on hand, where is this 500l. "in money"? Lent out? Owed to him? Where?

Pepys' Wealth: http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/9548/

About George Digby (2nd Earl of Bristol)

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DIGBY, GEORGE, second Earl of Bristol (1612-1677), son of John Digby, first earl of Bristol; born at Madrid; entered Magdalen College, Oxford, 1626; M.A, 1635; attacked Roman Catholicism in correspondence with Sir Kenelm Digby, 1638-9; M.P., Dorset, 1640; opposed third reading of bill for Strafford's attainder, though on committee for his impeachment, 1641; succeeded as Baron Digby, 1641; fled to Holland (1642) and was impeached by default for levying royalist troops; fought for Charles I at Edgehill, 1642, but gave up his command after a quarrel with Prince Rupert; secretary of state and privy councillor, 1643; high steward of Oxford University, 1643; lieutenant-general of the king's forces north of the Trent, 1646; defeated at Carlisle Sands; retired to France and took part in the Fronde, 1648; lieutenant-general in French army, 1651; detected in an intrigue against Mazarin, and forced to leave France; reappointed secretary of state to Charles II, 1657; subsequently deprived of the seals as a catholic; K.G., 1661; ineffectually impeached Clarendon (1663), who had foiled his scheme of an Italian marriage for the king; wrote comedies and, according to Walpole, translated from French first three books of 'Cassandra.'
---Dictionary of National Biography: Index and Epitome. S. Lee, 1906.

About Monday 23 September 1661

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"I never did pass a night with more epicurism of sleep"

Sam used the phrase "epicure-like" on 3 May 1661 and there are many annotations of epicurism there. http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1661/05/03/

About Tangier, Morocco

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This place, so often mentioned, was first given up to the English fleet under Lord Sandwich, by the Portuguese, January 30th, 1662; and Lord Peterborough left governor, with a garrison. The greatest pains were afterwards taken to preserve the fortress, and a fine mole was constructed at a vast expense, to improve the harbour. At length, after immense sums of money had been wasted there, the House of Commons expressed a dislike to the management of the garrison, which they suspected to be a nursery for a popish army, and seemed disinclined to maintain it any longer. The king consequently, in 1683, sent Lord Dartmouth to bring home the troops, and destroy the works; which he performed so effectually, that it would puzzle all our engineers to restore the harbour. It were idle to speculate on the benefits which might have accrued to England, by its preservation and retention; Tangier fell into the hands of the Moors, its importance having ceased with the demolition of the mole. Many curious views of Tangier were taken by Hollar, during its occupation by the English; and his drawings are preserved in the British Museum. Some have been engraved by himself; but the impressions are of considerable rarity. — B.
---Wheatley, 1899.

Views of Tanger by Wenzel Hollar: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:View...

About Capt. George Penn

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George Penn, elder brother of Sir William, was a merchant at San Lucar.
---Wheatley, 1899.

About Royal Mews

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The Mews stood on the site of the present National Gallery. The place was originally occupied by the king's falcons, but in the reign of Henry VIII. it was turned into a stable. After the battle of Naseby it was used as a prison for a time. The Mews was rebuilt in 1732, and taken down in 1830.
---Wheatley, 1899.

About Buckden, Cambridgeshire

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Bugden, or Buckden, a village and parish in the St. Neots district of Huntingdonshire, four miles S.W. of Huntingdon.
---Wheatley, 1899.