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Bill has posted 1896 annotations/comments since 9 March 2013.

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About Timber

Bill  •  Link

TIMBER, Wood for Building.
---An Universal Etymological English Dictionary. N. Bailey, 1724.

About Monday 21 July 1662

Bill  •  Link

"in the edge or rim of which was placed silver and gold medalls, very ancient, and I believe wrought, by which, if they be, they are the greatest rarity that ever I saw in my life"

MEDAL, a piece of metal representing the faces of princes, or other illustrious persons for arts, learning, arms, &c. on the one side, and some figures or emblematical representations on the other or reverse side. ... The most beautiful of the Roman medals began about the reign of Augustus, and held on till about the time of Severus, in which period they were wrought in all kinds of metals, and finished with wonderful strokes of art, and then as the empire declined, so did the excellency of their coin and medals.

WROUGHT, done, made, worked; also embellished with various ornaments.
---A new general English dictionary. T. Dyche, 1760.

About Samuel Cromleholme

Bill  •  Link

CROMLEHOLME, SAMUEL (1618-1672, head-master of St Paul's School; M.A. Corpus Christi College, Oxford; master of the Mercers' Chapel School, London; sur-master of St Paul's School 1647-51; master of Dorchester grammar school, 1651-7; head-master St Paul's School, 1657-72.
---Dictionary of National Biography: Index and Epitome. S. Lee, 1906.

About Sunday 20 July 1662

Bill  •  Link

"we had a calf’s head"

To bake a calf's head.
TAKE the head, pick it and wash it very clean; take an earthen dish large enough to lay the head on, rub a little piece of butter all over the dish, then lay some long iron skewers across the top of the dish, and lay the head on them; skewer up the meat in the middle that it don't lie on the dish, then grate some nutmeg all over it, a few sweet herbs shred small, some crumbs of bread, a little lemon-peel cut fine, and then flour it all over: stick pieces of butter in the eyes and all over the head, and flour it again. Let it be well baked, and of a fine brown; you may throw a little pepper and salt over it, and put into the dish a piece of beef cut small, a bundle of sweet-herbs, an onion, some whole pepper, a blade of mace, two cloves, a pint of water, and boil the brains with some sage. When the head is enough, lay it on a dish, and set it to the fire to-keep warm, then stir all together in the dish, and boil it in a saucepan; strain it off, put it into the sauce-pan again, add a piece of butter rolled in flour, and the sage in the brains chopped fine, a spoonful of catchup, and two spoonfuls of red wine; boil them together, take the brains, beat them well, and mix them with the sauce: pour it into the dish, and send it to table. You must bake the tongue with the head, and don't cut it out. It will lie the handsomer in the dish.
---The Art of Cookery, Made Plain and Easy. Hannah Glasse, 1774.

About Tar

Bill  •  Link

STOCKHOLM TAR. A bituminous liquid obtained from the wood of Pinna sylvestris (Linn.) and other species of Pinna by destructive distillation. The tar exported from Stockholm in earlier times, and to which the term Stockholm tar was applied, was brought from the northern part of Sweden and from Finland, where the tar was produced by peasants from dry wood stumps burned in tjardalar, or specially made tar-burning ground.
---Dictionary of Applied Chemistry, 1913, v.5, p.195.

About Thursday 17 July 1662

Bill  •  Link

“I this day took a general acquittance from my Lord”

ACQUITTANCE, a Release or Discharge in Writing, of a Debt, or any other Duty, formerly due.
---An Universal Etymological English Dictionary. N. Bailey, 1724.

About Fane, Lady Rachel (Countess of Bath)

Bill  •  Link

The manor [Basildon] subsequently came into the possession of the Fane family. Rachel, Countess of Bath (fifth daughter of Francis, first Earl of Westmoreland), who married, firstly, Henry Bourchier, last Earl of Bath, who died in 1654; and secondly, Lionel Cranfield, Earl of Middlesex; bequeathed the manor of Basildon to her nephew, Sir Henry Fane, K.B., whose son Charles Fane, Esq., was created, in 1711, Viscount Fane and Baron of Loughgayre, in the kingdom of Ireland. The Countess of Bath was born in 1613; and died 11 Nov. 1680. She was buried at Tavistock. co. Devon. Probably this manor was bequeathed to her by her first husband.
---Transactions of the Newbury District Field Club. 4:102, 1895

About Standish

Bill  •  Link

STANDISH, a standing Ink-horn for a Table.
---An Universal Etymological English Dictionary. N. Bailey, 1724.

About Monday 14 July 1662

Bill  •  Link

"did instruct myself in the nature and prices of tarr, but could not get Stockholm for the use of the office"

STOCKHOLM TAR. A bituminous liquid obtained from the wood of Pinna sylvestris (Linn.) and other species of Pinna by destructive distillation. The tar exported from Stockholm in earlier times, and to which the term Stockholm tar was applied, was brought from the northern part of Sweden and from Finland, where the tar was produced by peasants from dry wood stumps burned in tjardalar, or specially made tar-burning ground.
---Dictionary of Applied Chemistry, 1913, v.5, p.195.