Wednesday 24 October 1666

Up, and down to the Old Swan, and there find little Michell come to his new shop that he hath built there in the room of his house that was burned. I hope he will do good here. I drank and bade him joy, for I love him and his wife well, him for his care, and her for her person, and so to White Hall, where we attended the Duke; and to all our complaints for want of money, which now we are tired out with making, the Duke only tells us that he is sorry for it, and hath spoke to the King of it, and money we shall have as soon as it can be found; and though all the issue of the war lies upon it, yet that is all the answer we can get, and that is as bad or worse than nothing. Thence to Westminster Hall, where the term is begun, and I did take a turn or two, and so away by coach to Sir R. Viner’s, and there received some money, and then home and to dinner. After dinner to little business, and then abroad with my wife, she to see her brother, who is sick, and she believes is from some discontent his wife hath given him by her loose carriage, which he is told, and he hath found has been very suspicious in his absence, which I am sorry for. I to the Hall and there walked long, among others talking with Mr. Hayes, Prince Rupert’s Secretary, a very ingenious man, and one, I think, fit to contract some friendship with. Here I staid late, walking to and again, hearing how the Parliament proceeds, which is mighty slowly in the settling of the money business, and great factions growing every day among them. I am told also how Holmes did last Sunday deliver in his articles to the King and Cabinet against [Sir Jeremy] Smith, and that Smith hath given in his answer, and lays his not accompanying the fleete to his pilot, who would not undertake to carry the ship further; which the pilot acknowledges. The thing is not accommodated, but only taken up, and both sides commanded to be quiet; but no peace like to be. The Duke of Albemarle is Smith’s friend, and hath publiquely swore that he would never go to sea again unless Holmes’s commission were taken from him.1 I find by Hayes that they did expect great glory in coming home in so good condition as they did with the fleete, and therefore I the less wonder that the Prince was distasted with my discourse the other day about the bad state of the fleete. But it pleases me to hear that he did expect great thanks, and lays the fault of the want of it upon the fire, which deadened everything, and the glory of his services. About seven at night home, and called my wife, and, it being moonshine, took her into the garden, and there layed open our condition as to our estate, and the danger of my having it [his money] all in the house at once, in case of any disorder or troubles in the State, and therefore resolved to remove part of it to Brampton, and part some whither else, and part in my owne house, which is very necessary, and will tend to our safety, though I shall not think it safe out of my owne sight. So to the office, and then to supper and to bed.

  1. In the instructions given to Sir Thomas Clifford (August 5th, 1666) to be communicated to Prince Rupert and the Duke of Albemarle, we read: “to tell them that the complaint of Sir Jeremy Smith’s misbehaviour in the late engagement being so universal, unless he have fully satisfied the generals he should be brought to trial by court-martial, and there purged or condemned.” The Duke of Albemarle answered the king (August 14th?): “Wishes to clear a gallant man falsely accused, Sir Jeremiah Smith, who had more men killed and hurt, and his ship received more shot than any in the fleet. There is not a more spirited man serves in the fleet” On October 27th H. Muddiman wrote to Sir Edward Stradling: “Sir Jeremy Smith has got as much credit by his late examination as his enemies wished him disgrace, the King and Duke of York being fully satisfied of his valour in the engagement. It appears that he had 147 men killed and wounded, while the most eminent of his accusers had but two or three.” With regard to Sir Jeremy’s counter-charges, we read: “Nov. 3. The King having maturely considered the charges brought against Sir Rob. Holmes by Sir Jeremy Smith, finds no cause to suspect Sir Robert of cowardice in the fight with the Dutch of June 25 and 26, but thinks that on the night of the 26th he yielded too easily to the opinion of his pilot, without consulting those of the other ships, muzzled his ship, and thus obliged the squadron to do the same, and so the enemy, which might have been driven into the body of the king’s fleet, then returning from the pursuit, was allowed to escape” (” Calendar of State Papers,” 1666-67, pp. 14, 40, 222, 236).

18 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

The Royal Society today at Gresham College — from the Hooke Folio Online

Oct. 24. 1666. (expt. about propagating motion was prosecuted wth 3 ball of wch the middle remaind almost quiescent though struck by either of the Laterall ones which did impel each other vpwards

(It was moued that materialls for building. as earth for bricks tiles &c might be consider)

good tarris in Darbishere)

a caue about plimouth discouerd. 20 foot vnder ground 24 foot square vault couerd wth Icelles). cole balls -
(Staggs tears) Iumper curiositys by the hands of mr Hooke.)

It was orderd tht the persons appointed for transfusion should meet and if they succeeded to shew it to the Society)

http://webapps.qmul.ac.uk/cell/Hooke/hooke_foli...

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"expt. about propagating motion was prosecuted wth 3 ball of wch the middle remaind almost quiescent though struck by either of the Laterall ones which did impel each other vpwards"

This was a smaller version of "Newton's Cradle," a device created in 1967 by English actor Simon Prebble and named in honor of Sir Isaac Newton, because it illustrates his Laws of Motion.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Newtons_cradl...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newton's_laws_of_m...

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"(It was moued that materialls for building. as earth for bricks tiles &c might be consider)"

Robert Hooke was among those who quickly urged the rebuilding of London in brick and stone, not wooden planks -- contra Pepys and Warren..

"good tarris in Darbishere”

Trass \Trass\, n. [D. tras or Gr. trass, probably fr. It. terrazzo terrace. See Terrace.] (Geol.)
A white to gray volcanic tufa, formed of decomposed trachytic cinders; — sometimes used as a cement. Hence, a coarse sort of plaster or mortar, durable in water, and used to line cisterns and other reservoirs of water. [Formerly written also tarras, tarrace, terras.]
http://dictionary.die.net/tarras

Jesse   Link to this

"who had more men killed and hurt, and his ship received more shot than any in the fleet"

I knew this rang a bell, just different names...

"...he had hardly a shot in his side nor a man killed, whereas he hath above 30 in her hull, and not one mast whole nor yard; but the most battered ship of the fleet, and lost most men, saving Captain Smith of “The Mary." http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1665/06/23/

Mary   Link to this

"there layed open our condition as to our estate"

What refreshing openness from husband to wife. Sam, of course, still controls the purse-strings, but at least he lets Elizabeth know how they stand financially. Sharp contrast with many a later wife who had no idea at all of the family's financial standing.

Sam may cavil about this, that and the other from time to time, but at bottom he clearly trusts Elizabeth.

Lawrence   Link to this

"Up, and down to the Old Swan, and there find little Michell come to his new shop that he hath built there in the room of his house that was burned. I hope he will do good here. I drank and bade him joy, for I love him and his wife well, him for his care, and her for her person"
L&M call this place, probably a strong-water house, Am I right in assuming that sam, drinking, and "bade him joy" was drinking Gin here?

Ruben   Link to this

"I drank and bade him joy, for I love him and his wife well, him for his care, and her for her person”.

After reading Sam's diary for as long as it is being posted, may I transmogrify this to:
"him for his care, and her for her body”?

A. Hamilton   Link to this

"I knew this rang a bell, just different names…"

Different engagement, but Capt. Smith of the Mary is the same Sir Jeremy[Jeremiah] Smith accused of cowardice by Holmes. In both battles his ship appears to have sustained great damage.

While taking more casualties was advanced by Lord Sandwich in 1665 as a defense against accusations of avoiding battle, and may even be a point of pride among captains, I appreciate Michael McCollough's comment at the link provided by Jesse :

"'…and lost most men…' I wonder if anyone’s made the connection between metrics like this and having to kidnap people to serve in the navy?"

language hat   Link to this

"and there find little Michell come to his new shop that he hath built there in the room of his house that was burned."

In case anyone is having trouble with this, "in the room of" means "in place of."

phoenix   Link to this

"...to see her brother, who is sick, and she believes is from some discontent his wife hath given him by her loose carriage, which he is told, and he hath found has been very suspicious in his absence, which I am sorry for."

Sorry for Balty's 'discontent' or for her 'loose carriage'?

No apparent connection made between his philandering and its possible consequences even when - involving others - it is close to home. A whiff of entitlement, perhaps?

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Greater love hath no Pepys than he should reveal things financial to Bess...

"I love my wife but oh you kid..." apparently sums up Sam's marital philsophy.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"Am I right in assuming that sam, drinking, and “bade him joy” was drinking Gin here?"

"strong-waters" was any distilled liquor, among which gin had been "sold in pharmacies and used to treat such medical problems as kidney ailments, lumbago, stomach ailments, gallstones, and gout. It had been present in England in varying forms since the early 17th century, and at the time of The Restoration enjoyed a brief resurgence. It was only when William of Orange, ruler of the Dutch Republic, seized the British throne in what has become known as the Glorious Revolution that gin became vastly more popular, particularly in its baser forms, when it was more likely to be flavored with turpentine, rather than the juniper of later London gins." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gin#History

So, Lawrence, one does wonder.

CGS   Link to this

"...loose carriage,..." the bane of all that be away from the luv nest, serving their master. [dear jack]
There be a lot of cuckoos available to satisfy the lonely nester.

Many seek the pleasure of the moment as our 'ero attests to, many times when the opportunity arises and hell with to-morrow.

Carpe Diem

CGS   Link to this

Another day in the saga of failure.
Not me ;'im:

Have not invented toilet paper yet.

CGS   Link to this

H of C.
ban men from nicking each other:
AND
Lawyers be at work again
"

Suits arising from Fire of London.

A Bill for present Prevention of Suits by Landlords against their Tenants, whose Houses were burnt down by the late Fire, was read the First time.

Ordered, That this Bill be read the Second time on Friday next.
see H of C

CGS   Link to this

wall of coffee shoppe
"eat English beef not Irish"
"Upset Lord said "the kids are not mine, I've been cuckood""

-------------------------------------

Bill to illegitimate Lady Roos's Children.
Bill to prevent the Importation of Irish Cattle.

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?co...

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"“Staggs tears”"

Joseph Scaliger ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Justus_Scal... ) had thought lacrima cervi, or "stag's tear" was "a bony concretion that formed in the corner of a stag’s eye only after the animal had passed its hundredth year," which no stag does, but "he describes it as though he had carefully inspected a specimen, saying that it was so smooth and light that it would almost slip through the fingers of anyone who held it in his hand. It had similar powers to those of the bezoar, being a powerful antidote to poisons and a cure for the plague if powdered and given with wine; these good effects resulting from the excessively profuse perspiration that followed the administration of the dose.”
http://www.jjkent.com/articles/history-medicine...

Michael Robinson   Link to this

““Staggs tears”” Scaligar

The Scaligar in question is Julius Caesar Scaliger (1484-1558) who was, inter alia, a medical authority ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julius_Caesar_Scal... ) and not his son Josephus Justus Scaliger (1540-1609), the distinguished scholar. For a recent discussion of the work of J. J. Scaliger see Anthony Grafton 'Defenders of the Text; the traditions of Scholarship in an age of science, 1450-1800' Cambridge: Harvard U.P., 1991. pp. 104-144.

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