Sunday 24 May 1668

(Lord’s day). I up, at between two and three in the morning, and, calling up my boy, and father’s boy, we set out by three o’clock, it being high day; and so through the water with very good success, though very deep almost all the way, and got to Brampton, where most of them in bed, and so I weary up to my wife’s chamber, whom I find in bed, and pretended a little not well, and indeed she hath those upon her, but fell to talk and mightily pleased both of us, and upgot the rest, Betty Turner and Willet and Jane, all whom I was glad to see, and very merry, and got me ready in my new stuff clothes that I send down before me, and so my wife and they got ready too, while I to my father, poor man, and walked with him up and down the house — it raining a little, and the waters all over Portholme and the meadows, so as no pleasure abroad. Here I saw my brothers and sister Jackson, she growing fat, and, since being married, I think looks comelier than before: but a mighty pert woman she is, and I think proud, he keeping her mighty handsome, and they say mighty fond, and are going shortly to live at Ellington of themselves, and will keep malting, and grazing of cattle. At noon comes Mr. Phillips and dines with us, and a pretty odd-humoured man he seems to be; but good withal, but of mighty great methods in his eating and drinking, and will not kiss a woman since his wife’s death. After dinner my Lady Sandwich sending to see whether I was come, I presently took horse, and find her and her family at chapel; and thither I went in to them, and sat out the sermon, where I heard Jervas Fullwood, now their chaplain, preach a very good and seraphic kind of sermon, too good for an ordinary congregation. After sermon, I with my Lady, and my Lady Hinchingbroke, and Paulina, and Lord Hinchingbroke, to the dining-room, saluting none of them, and there sat and talked an hour or two, with great pleasure and satisfaction, to my Lady, about my Lord’s matters; but I think not with that satisfaction to her, or me, that otherwise would, she knowing that she did design tomorrow, and I remaining all the while in fear, of being asked to lend her some money, as I was afterward, when I had taken leave of her, by Mr. Shepley, 100l., which I will not deny my Lady, and am willing to be found when my Lord comes home to have done something of that kind for them, and so he riding to Brampton and supping there with me he did desire it of me from my Lady, and I promised it, though much against my will, for I fear it is as good as lost. After supper, where very merry, we to bed, myself very weary and to sleep all night.

15 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"Mr. Phillips...will not kiss a woman since his wife’s death"

For the curious, L&M note his wife had died in December 1665.

Chris Squire   Link to this

' . . I with my Lady, and my Lady Hinchingbroke, and Paulina, and Lord Hinchingbroke, to the dining-room, saluting none of them, . . '

Meaning, I think, that he met them as an equal.

' . . I remaining all the while in fear, of being asked to lend her some money, as I was afterward . . by Mr. Shepley, 100l., which I will not deny my Lady, and am willing to be found when my Lord comes home to have done something of that kind for them, . . I fear it is as good as lost.'

This £100 was in effect a levy on his good fortune by his now impoverished patron, who had made his good fortune possible. Sandwich had 4 more years to live; after his death such levies, I imagine, ceased and Pepys could concentrate on enriching himself.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"father's boy"? First, horses to send, now a "boy"...When did John Sr. start rolling in dough?

Paul Chapin   Link to this

"saluting none of them"
In the past Sam has used "saluting" to mean "kissing."

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Kissing seems to be a theme today.

Peter Taylor   Link to this

Sam has been getting up very early the last couple of days, no doubt he gets his servants to wake him, in those days what would a servant use as an alarm clock?

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Congrats on finding a nice guy, Pall.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"Sam has been getting up very early the last couple of days, no doubt he gets his servants to wake him, in those days what would a servant use as an alarm clock?"

14 July 1665, Pepys concludes his daily Diary entry: "...up betimes by the helpe of a larum watch, which by chance I borrowed of my watchmaker to-day, while my owne is mending." http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1665/07/14/
L&M note "Alarm-watches are almost as old as watches themselves."

Chris Squire   Link to this

Kissing or not? This from OED:

‘salute v. 1. a. trans. To accost or address with words expressive of good wishes, respect, or homage, esp. with some customary formula of that import; to greet in words.
. .1597 Shakespeare Romeo & Juliet ii. ii. 32 Rom: Good morrow.‥ Fri: Benedicite, what earlie tongue so soone saluteth me?
1712 Swift Jrnl. to Stella 22 Jan. (1948) II. 469 T'other day at the court of requests Dr. Yalden saluted me by name . .

2. a. To greet with some gesture or visible action conventionally expressive of respect or courteous recognition.
. . 1655 T. Stanley Hist. Philos. I. iii. 25 As soon as the Sun arose, [he] saluted it, and retir'd.
1728 E. Chambers Cycl. at Salutation, In England, &c. we salute one another by uncovering the Head, inclining the Body, &c. The Orientals by uncovering their Feet, laying their Hands on the Breast, &c. . .

e. trans. To kiss, or greet with a kiss. arch.
. . 1716 J. Addison Drummer iv. 37 Ab. Ay! but you han't saluted me. Fan. That's right; Faith I forgot that Circumstance. [Kisses her.] . . ‘

roboto   Link to this

I don't understand "we set out by three o’clock, it being high day". Does anyone understand this? How is it possible that is daylight at 3am?

RogerTheWeather   Link to this

'How is it possible that is daylight at 3am?'

Sunrise would be about 0350hrs in London on 24May #as now!#...
...#but we put the clock forward an hour these days for BST#,...twilight would have been 30-45mins before depending on cloud cover.
Even with putting the clock forward an hour for BST many, many people are missing out on a lot of daylight these days. There is a lobby for double-summertime, which I go along with personally.

Glyn   Link to this

Sunrise at the moment is before 5 o'clock and it gets light for 30 mintues or so before then. It's not too significant but England was still using the old calendar which had become inaccuarate and is about a week later than nowadays(i.e. so this entry was written in the equivalent of early June.

LKvM   Link to this

Doesn't anyone use the term "first light" in England? That's what the period of morning twilight (Morgendaemmerung, the opposite of evening twilight, Abenddaemmerung) is called in the United States. But whether that's what Sam means by "high day," I couldn't say.

GrahamT   Link to this

In Britain we tend to call the twilight period before sunrise "dawn" and the corresponding evening period "dusk". I would be suprised if these terms weren't also common in North America. First light would, I guess, be the very earliest part of dawn.

Given the change in calendar, sunrise in Cambridge on this day would be about 3:45 (GMT) and civil dawn (sun 6 degrees below horizon, and light in all of sky) starts about 2:57. Not quite high day as we might think it, but certainly light enough to travel.

PeterM   Link to this

In Australia, all the terms (ie "first light," "dawn," "dusk) are used. I am reasonably confident that in most English speaking countries this is probably true.

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