Wednesday 18 March 1667/68

Up betimes to Westminster, where met with cozen Roger and Creed and walked with them, and Roger do still continue of the mind that there is no other way of saving this nation but by dissolving this Parliament and calling another; but there are so many about the King that will not be able to stand, if a new Parliament come, that they will not persuade the King to it. I spent most of the morning walking with one or other, and anon met Doll Lane at the Dog tavern, and there je did hater what I did desire with her … and I did give her as being my valentine 20s. to buy what elle would. Thence away by coach to my bookseller’s, and to several places to pay my debts, and to Ducke Lane, and there bought Montaigne’s Essays, in English, and so away home to dinner, and after dinner with W. Pen to White Hall, where we and my Lord Brouncker attended the Council, to discourse about the fitness of entering of men presently for the manning of the fleete, before one ship is in condition to receive them. W. Coventry did argue against it: I was wholly silent, because I saw the King, upon the earnestness of the Prince, was willing to it, crying very sillily, “If ever you intend to man the fleete, without being cheated by the captains and pursers, you may go to bed, and resolve never to have it manned;” and so it was, like other things, over- ruled that all volunteers should be presently entered. Then there was another great business about our signing of certificates to the Exchequer for [prize] goods, upon the 1,250,000l. Act, which the Commissioners of the Treasury did all oppose, and to the laying fault upon us. But I did then speak to the justifying what we had done, even to the angering of Duncomb and Clifford, which I was vexed at: but, for all that, I did set the Office and myself right, and went away with the victory, my Lord Keeper saying that he would not advise the Council to order us to sign no more certificates. But, before I began to say anything in this matter, the King and the Duke of York talking at the Council-table, before all the Lords, of the Committee of Miscarriages, how this entering of men before the ships could be ready would be reckoned a miscarriage; “Why,” says the King, “it is then but Mr. Pepys making of another speech to them;” which made all the Lords, and there were by also the Atturny and Sollicitor- Generall, look upon me. Thence Sir W. Coventry, W. Pen and I, by hackney-coach to take a little ayre in Hyde Parke, the first time I have been there this year; and we did meet many coaches going and coming, it being mighty pleasant weather; and so, coming back again, I ‘light in the Pell Mell; and there went to see Sir H. Cholmly, who continues very ill of his cold. And there come in Sir H. Yelverton, whom Sir H. Cholmly commended me to his acquaintance, which the other received, but without remembering to me, or I him, of our being school-fellows together; and I said nothing of it. But he took notice of my speech the other day at the bar of the House; and indeed I perceive he is a wise man by his manner of discourse, and here he do say that the town is full of it, that now the Parliament hath resolved upon 300,000l., the King, instead of fifty, will set out but twenty-five ships, and the Dutch as many; and that Smith is to command them, who is allowed to have the better of Holmes in the late dispute, and is in good esteem in the Parliament, above the other. Thence home, and there, in favour to my eyes, stayed at home, reading the ridiculous History of my Lord Newcastle, wrote by his wife, which shews her to be a mad, conceited, ridiculous woman, and he an asse to suffer her to write what she writes to him, and of him. Betty Turner sent my wife the book to read, and it being a fair print, to ease my eyes, which would be reading, I read that. Anon comes Mrs. Turner and sat and talked with us, and most about the business of Ackworth,1 which comes before us to-morrow, that I would favour it, but I do not think, notwithstanding all the friendship I can shew him, that he can escape, and therefore it had been better that he had followed the advice I sent him the other day by Mrs. Turner, to make up the business. So parted, and I to bed, my eyes being very bad; and I know not how in the world to abstain from reading.

  1. William Acworth, storekeeper at Woolwich, was accused of converting stores to his own use (see “Calendar of State Papers,” 1667-68, p. 279).

7 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

What the ellipsis suppressed

"...and anon met Doll Lane at the Dog tavern, and there yo did hazer what I did desire with her and did it backward, not having convenience to do it the other way. And I did give her as being my valentine, 20s. to buy what elle would."

L&M text.

Christopher Squire   Link to this

' . . Roger do still continue of the mind that there is no other way of saving this nation but by dissolving this Parliament and calling another; but there are so many about the King that will not be able to stand, if a new Parliament come, that they will not persuade the King to it .. '

Plus ca change, plus c'est le meme chose!

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Supply.

The House then resumed the Debate of the Matter touching his Majesty's Supply.

Resolved, &c. That a Poll Bill be brought in, towards the Supply of his Majesty; wherein no Housholders, which are not worth Twenty Pounds, shall be taxed for themselves, or their Children.

Resolved, &c. That so much of the remaining Two hundred thousand Pounds, which shall not be raised by the Poll Bill, or otherwise given this Session of Parliament, shall be supplied by an Imposition on Wines at the Custom-house. http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?co...

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Our Sam...Subject of a royal witticism. He has nearly reached the promised land.

Paul Chapin   Link to this

"Resolved, &c. That a Poll Bill be brought in, towards the Supply of his Majesty; wherein no Housholders, which are not worth Twenty Pounds, shall be taxed for themselves, or their Children."
Seeds of a progressive tax structure.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Seeds of tax-exempt status for charitable institutions yesterday when the Church was excused from direct imposts and allowed to decide in Convocation whether to pay anything into the public coffers. More today about this:

[Debate, whether the Clergy should be comprehended in the Poll Bill.]

Sir William Coventry.] The Chapter of Windsor alone has laid out 26,000 l. in repairs, and other charitable uses, since they were restored—Generally the old Clergy are dead, and have left their successors in very lean places—He has many other instances of that nature, but is unprepared to speak to the business; but will satisfy any gentleman, he having collected many particulars of that nature.

Mr Sollicitor Finch.] Besides the iniquity and injustice of the example, the Clergy estates being already gone into other families, never any tax since our late necessities were the Clergy taxed with, but by the Convocation; but in a Poll Bill, as they are a part of mankind, they have been—Never did the Parliament lay any tax upon the Laity, that the Clergy did rise without taxing themselves in their Convocation—If they, who know the sore and the weaker places of the Clergy, tax themselves, can we know them better?—The Papists say that since Pater Noster was out of England we have built few churches; but Bishop Andrews demonstrates, that the Clergy, in works of piety, are not, since that time, debtors to mankind—His Grace of Canterbury (fn. 2) is now building a theatre at Oxford worth 15,000 l.—Look upon Cardinals and their nephews (we have none of them) and you will not see such public works, or any like ours, either public or private.

Mr Waller.] In these things, on both sides, great mistakes, and much partiality—In King James's time, for the Palatinate, we here gave three subsidies, the Clergy six—He has been told by old men it was usual, but withall, that this House never taxed the Clergy—But in the tax for Ireland, the Clergy were taxed with the parish; but what they lost by it in dignity they got in profit—We then broke in upon them—The matter was about religion—Should we make a new Law, we break in upon them afresh—Among themselves they will consider the meaner Clergy—Let us see what they will do, and consider them accordingly—Perhaps we may do less upon them than they themselves; therefore put no negative upon them.

Mr Vaughan.] Affirms that the Clergy were never here rated till our Interregnum—The Clergy, upon the roll, is often called one of the estates, in calculating the quality of the people, but in Law-making not—He would set the House right in that point.
http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?co...

Ireland is a different case, of course.

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

"and there bought Montaigne’s Essays, in English"

Guess I was wrong in my assumption on March 17th! The English translation it is...

That's quite the late Valentine's Day present, Sam.

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