Sunday 27 January 1666/67

(Lord’s day). Up betimes, and leaving my wife to go by coach to hear Mr. Frampton preach, which I had a mighty desire she should, I down to the Old Swan, and there to Michell and staid while he and she dressed themselves, and here had a ‘baiser’ or two of her, whom I love mightily; and then took them in a sculler (being by some means or other disappointed of my own boat) to White Hall, and so with them to Westminster, Sir W. Coventry, Bruncker and I all the morning together discoursing of the office business, and glad of the Controller’s business being likely to be put into better order than formerly, and did discourse of many good things, but especially of having something done to bringing the Surveyor’s matters into order also. Thence I up to the King’s closet, and there heard a good Anthem, and discoursed with several people here about business, among others with Lord Bellasses, and so from one to another after sermon till the King had almost dined, and then home with Sir G. Carteret and dined with him, being mightily ashamed of my not having seen my Lady Jemimah so long, and my wife not at all yet since she come, but she shall soon do it. I thence to Sir Philip Warwicke, by appointment, to meet Lord Bellasses, and up to his chamber, but find him unwilling to discourse of business on Sundays; so did not enlarge, but took leave, and went down and sat in a low room, reading Erasmus “de scribendis epistolis,” a very good book, especially one letter of advice to a courtier most true and good, which made me once resolve to tear out the two leaves that it was writ in, but I forebore it. By and by comes Lord Bellasses, and then he and I up again to Sir P. Warwicke and had much discourse of our Tangier business, but no hopes of getting any money. Thence I through the garden into the Park, and there met with Roger Pepys, and he and I to walk in the Pell Mell. I find by him that the House of Parliament continues full of ill humours, and he seems to dislike those that are troublesome more than needs, and do say how, in their late Poll Bill, which cost so much time, the yeomanry, and indeed two-thirds of the nation, are left out to be taxed, that there is not effectual provision enough made for collecting of the money; and then, that after a man his goods are distrained and sold, and the overplus returned, I am to have ten days to make my complaints of being over-rated if there be cause, when my goods are sold, and that is too late. These things they are resolved to look into again, and mend them before they rise, which they expect at furthest on Thursday next. Here we met with Mr. May, and he and we to talk of several things, of building, and such like matters; and so walked to White Hall, and there I shewed my cozen Roger the Duchesse of York sitting in state, while her own mother stands by her; he had a desire, and I shewed him my Lady Castlemayne, whom he approves to be very handsome, and wonders that she cannot be as good within as she is fair without. Her little black boy came by him; and, a dog being in his way, the little boy called to the dog: “Pox of this dog!” — “Now,” says he, blessing himself, “would I whip this child till the blood come, if it were my child!” and I believe he would. But he do by no means like the liberty of the Court, and did come with expectation of finding them playing at cards to-night, though Sunday; for such stories he is told, but how true I know not.1 After walking up and down the Court with him, it being now dark and past six at night, I walked to the Swan in the Palace yard and there with much ado did get a waterman, and so I sent for the Michells, and they come, and their father Howlett and his wife with them, and there we drank, and so into the boat, poor Betty’s head aching. We home by water, a fine moonshine and warm night, it having been also a very summer’s day for warmth. I did get her hand to me under my cloak … So there we parted at their house, and he walked almost home with me, and then I home and to supper, and to read a little and to bed. My wife tells me Mr. Frampton is gone to sea, and so she lost her labour to-day in thinking to hear him preach, which I am sorry for.

  1. There is little reason to doubt that it was such as Evelyn describes it at a later time. “I can never forget the inexpressible luxury and prophaneness, gaming, and all dissoluteness, and, as it were, total forgetfulness of God (it being Sunday evening) which this day se’nnight I was witness of; the King sitting and toying with his concubines, Portsmouth, Cleveland, Mazarin, &c. A French boy singing love songs in that glorious gallery, whilst about twenty of the great courtiers and other dissolute persons were at basset round a large table, a bank of at least 2,000l. in gold before them; upon which two gentlemen who were with me made reflexions with astonishment. Six days after was all in the dust.”—Diary, February, 1685. — B.

19 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Ormond to Burlington
Written from: Dublin
Date: 27 January 1667

The Earl's letter of the 15th inst [ = of the present month http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=inst ], with the enclosed narrative of the manner of the passing of the Bill against Irish Cattle, came at the moment of closing the writer's dispatch of yesterday.

The narrative causes more surprise than the thing itself causes trouble ... Time, industry, peace, may recover the hurt ... It is to be hoped that the Commons will now think about securing the King, & preserving their Country from certain dishonour, and very probable ruin ...

http://www.bodley.ox.ac.uk/dept/scwmss/projects...

Terry Foreman   Link to this

“After walking up and down the Court with him, it being now dark and past 6 at night, I walked to the Swan in the Palace yard and there with much ado did get a waterman; and so I sent for the Michells and they came, and their father Howlett and his wife with them, and there we drank; and so into the boat ­ poor Betty’s head akeing. We home by water, a fine moonshine and warm night, it having been also a very summers day for warmth. I did get her hand to me under my cloak and did oter sa gans, but ella ne voudroit tocar mi cosa today, whatever the matter was, and I was loath to contrendre her to faire, de peur qu’ell faisait son mari prendre notice thereof. So there we parted at their house, and he walked almost home with me; and I to supper, and to read a little and to bed.”

http://www.pepys.info/bits5.html

language hat   Link to this

"I did get her hand to me under my cloak and did oter sa gans, but ella ne voudroit tocar mi cosa today, whatever the matter was, and I was loath to contrendre her to faire, de peur qu’ell faisait son mari prendre notice thereof."

"I did get her hand to me under my cloak and did remove her glove, but she didn't want to touch my thing today, whatever the matter was, and I was loath to force her to to it, for fear that she would cause her husband to take notice thereof."

Good for you, Betty!

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Wonder if Roger would whip Sam till the blood came if he knew of his little game today.

Poor Betty, though it strikes me as likely she's been counseled by someone (Mom?) to say nothing but simply resist. Sam is lucky in his choice of poor family to exploit, some would have gutted him and thrown him overboard.

***

"Mighty desire" she should hear the apparently fashionable preacher-star, eh? Of course we know why he wanted her out of the way but was Frampton's message one that he felt would be good for Bess?

"And if thee do come across thy husband and lord fondling a guest actress' breast in thy best chamber, the Lord doth say that it is best to put thine eye in the way of blindness..."

language hat   Link to this

And good for Sam for not tearing out those pages of Erasmus.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Mitchell doesn't seem a Bagwell, at least Sam seems to fear his finding out about his little "attentions" to Betty.

***
Heaven...

"Mr. Pepys..." curt growl. "Pepys." curter growl.

"Mitchell? Knipp? Pardon me, urgent business."

"Now, now. Mr. Pepys. This is Heaven. We are here for reconcilation not violence." St. Peter, reassuringly. "You have nothing to fear. Lets remember you are in on probation."

"Well...If I may then, gentlemen, I hope a sincere apology...And my best wishes to your wives."

Pow. Ooof. Pow. Body slam. Pow. Kick.

Groan...To Peter desperately trying not to chuckle as Knipp and Mitchell stroll off for a pint together.

"'Saint' Peter, they call you? You lied to me?"

"Only twice...I'm getting better." Peter grins. "We're all on probation, Samuel. And only human, even here."

"Ohhh..."

"Nothing you didn't deserve, you know." Bess steps forward, offering hand. "Come on. At least you know they read your Diary."

CGS   Link to this

"...being by some means or other disappointed of my own boat..."
His regular [on retainer?] Oarsman sitting in his Sunday pew not on the bench to-day.???

strange words!

CGS   Link to this

Whervnto is added a declamacion,
That chyldren euen strayt frõ their
infancie should be well and gent-
ly broughte vp in learnynge.
Written fyrst in Latin
by the most excel-
lent and
famous Clearke, Erasmus
of Rotero-
dame.

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/28338/28338-h/28...

CGS   Link to this

"...Her little black boy came by him;..."
so controversial a statement......

Bryan M   Link to this

"I thence to Sir Philip Warwicke, by appointment, to meet Lord Bellasses, and up to his chamber, but find him unwilling to discourse of business on Sundays; ... By and by comes Lord Bellasses, and then he and I up again to Sir P. Warwicke and had much discourse of our Tangier business..."

Sam goes to see Sir Philip to do business "by appointment" but is told no dice it's Sunday. Then Lord B arrives and it's down to business. A strange situation but Sam makes no comment.

It seems that Warwick's religious (?) concerns about working on Sunday applied to commoners like Sam but did not extend to those further up the pecking order than himself.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"“Now,” says he, blessing himself, “would I whip this child till the blood come, if it were my child!”..."

Bad moment in parenting; great moment in racial equality...I try to picture the look on some Klansman's face reading Roger's casual view of the boy as bratty kid first.

The American South, 1948...

"But daddy, is this seventeenth century guy saying he has no problem seein' this black person as his own kid?"

"Ummn...That tain't fit reading for you, son." Strom Thurmond nervously grabs Diary.

"...And if those Jewish folks was so nice to Mr. Pepys before that time he visited their synagogue..."

"When I'm President this kind of filth'll be burned, son."

A. De Araujo   Link to this

"her little black boy"
Well, he had some Medici in him.

Susan Scott   Link to this

"Her little black boy"

Most likely this is Lady Castlemaine's first son by the king. Charles Fitzroy (1662-1730) will in time become both Duke of Southampton and Duke of Cleveland, but here he's just a foul-mouthed four-year-old. Charles doted on his (many) illegitimate children, and visiting them was a regular part of his day. It's not surprising that this son is here now, or, given the company of his parents' friends, that he swears at the dog.

As A.De Araujo noted, he did have his father's Medici coloring, qualifying him as "black" in the parlance of the day. He's the lovely 'child' in Lely's "Madonna & Child" with Lady Castlemaine as the Madonna:
http://tinyurl.com/ylngqgq

arby   Link to this

Error, "Bad title" on the link, Susan.

Susan Scott   Link to this

Sorry about that bad link! That's what comes of being lazy and trusting Wikipedia too much. *g* Here's the painting from the National Portrait Gallery site, which should be more reliable:

http://www.npg.org.uk/collections/search/portra...

arby   Link to this

Neat, thankee!

ONeville   Link to this

Looks as if butter wouldn't melt in his mouth

Australian Susan   Link to this

Lady C makes a very smug-looking Madonna!

Sam's remarks about the Poll Tax and the complexities and problems associated with it, reminded me very much of the debates in the 80s in the UK about the Community Charge, which everyone called the Poll Tax: a most unwelcome tax.

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