Monday 25 May 1668

Waked betimes, and lay long … and there fell to talking, and by and by rose, it being the first fair day, and yet not quite fair, that we have had some time, and so up, and to walk with my father again in the garden, consulting what to do with him and this house when Pall and her husband go away; and I think it will be to let it, and he go live with her, though I am against letting the house for any long time, because of having it to retire to, ourselves. So I do intend to think more of it before I resolve. By and by comes Mr. Cooke to see me and so spent the morning, and he gone by and by at noon to dinner, where Mr. Shepley come and we merry, all being in good humour between my wife and her people about her, and after dinner took horse, I promising to fetch her away about fourteen days hence, and so calling all of us, we men on horseback, and the women and my father, at Goody Gorum’s, and there in a frolic drinking I took leave, there going with me and my boy, my two brothers, and one Browne, whom they call in mirth Colonell, for our guide, and also Mr. Shepley, to the end of Huntingdon, and another gentleman who accidentally come thither, one Mr. Castle; and I made them drink at the Chequers, where I observed the same tapster, Tom, that was there when I was a little boy and so we, at the end of the town, took leave of Shepley and the other gentleman, and so we away and got well to Cambridge, about seven to the Rose, the waters not being now so high as before. And here ‘lighting, I took my boy and two brothers, and walked to Magdalene College: and there into the butterys, as a stranger, and there drank my bellyfull of their beer, which pleased me, as the best I ever drank: and hear by the butler’s man, who was son to Goody Mulliner over against the College, that we used to buy stewed prunes of, concerning the College and persons in it; and find very few, only Mr. Hollins and Pechell, I think, that were of my time. But I was mightily pleased to come in this condition to see and ask, and thence, giving the fellow something, away walked to Chesterton, to see our old walk, and there into the Church, the bells ringing, and saw the place I used to sit in, and so to the ferry, and ferried over to the other side, and walked with great pleasure, the river being mighty high by Barnewell Abbey: and so by Jesus College to the town, and so to our quarters, and to supper, and then to bed, being very weary and sleepy and mightily pleased with this night’s walk.

21 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

The ellipsis above (at the top) omits shameless love L&M provide....

"Waked betimes, and lay long hazendo doz con mi moher con grande pleasure to me and ella; and there fell to talking, and by and by rose, it being the first fair day

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Ormond to Captain George Mathew
Written from: Moor Park - 25 May 1668

Affairs of estate, and of personal and family finance. Necessity of some remittances for the redemption of plate, and for the cancelling of certain outstanding bonds. ...

http://www.rsl.ox.ac.uk/dept/scwmss/projects/ca...

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Thought I'd post this for those interested in how assets were managed by nobles.

mary k mcintyre   Link to this

Can we get that ellipsis en Anglais, por favor?

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Well damned about time, Sam. Geesh, reunion after plague and fire apparently didn't do it (unless you were strangely discreet) but a trip to Brampton gets Bess into ... land.

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"...all being in good humour between my wife and her people about her..." Now that is cause for astonishment. After all this time in Brampton one might have expected Bess to be sitting alone amongst a pile of corpses. She must have brought some decent wedding gifts for Pall.

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"I promising to fetch her away about fourteen days hence..." The Spring of Sam continues...What is Bess thinking? Or up to?

Paul Chapin   Link to this

Mary, not sure about "doz", but in the context the meaning is clear: "lay long making love with my wife with great pleasure to me and her"

ONeville   Link to this

Dos, in Spanish, means, of course, two. So Sam could mean twice. Just to show that he has really missed her

Carl in Boston   Link to this

the waters not being now so high as before.
The ground water in my back yard is about a foot below the surface, according to my test borings. Must be the waters of May.
and find very few, only Mr. Hollins and Pechell, I think, that were of my time
MIT is having its 150th anniversary, and I'm going to go. Very few professors left of my time, and those remaining are snarling curmudgeons. Like Pepys, I'll poke and pry on my own. I live nearby and have my own tour of the old college places in mind.

classicist   Link to this

Wow, Sam's energetic! It was only yesterday that he got up in the small hours to ride to Brampton (it must have taken several hours and been a hard ride in the flood) after which he put in a full day with family and business. I'd want a day off after that, but he is up 'betimes' (and makes love twice, yes) before riding back with a whole mob of friends and hangers-on, partying at the Chequers in Huntingdon before visiting his old college in Cambridge. After all that, with a hard day's ride ahead, would you feel like walking to Chesterton and back just for fun? (It takes about an hour, using the bridge.)

mary k mcintyre   Link to this

"moher" = odd to refer to one's wife as 'mother' (would freak me out if husband did so).

Also, per yesterday's entry I thought that she was having some painful lady troubles, not inclining one toward lovemaking...

nix   Link to this

"Mujer" (pronounced Samuel's transliteration, "moher") is the Spanish word for "woman," not mother ("madre").

Dos veces? Que hombre, Samuel!

Mary   Link to this

Elizabeth's intimate problems seem to have abated in recent times - we haven't heard anything further of them for quite a while now.

Geoff Hallett   Link to this

I always imagine Sam as a smallish portly fellow, do we know his height?

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"After all that, with a hard day’s ride ahead, would you feel like walking to Chesterton and back just for fun? " -- with a "bellyfull" of beer?!

Michael L   Link to this

"I always imagine Sam as a smallish portly fellow"

Smallish, perhaps, but I seriously doubt he's portly, given the miles of walking around London he apparently does each day.

Paul Chapin   Link to this

Nix is right that Spanish "mujer" means 'woman', but it also means 'wife', which is how Sam is using it here.

I know that "dos" means 'two', but that doesn't feel to me like the right gloss in this passage. Do L&M show the same "doz" here?

Mary   Link to this

Yes, Paul, L&M concur in "doz".

language hat   Link to this

"I know that “dos” means ‘two’, but that doesn’t feel to me like the right gloss in this passage."

I agree, and I don't think we can know what he intended here.

Mary   Link to this

L&M reads "doz vezes" = modern Spanish "dos veces"
Meaning = "two times" i.e. twice.

I don't see where the problem lies.

Paul Chapin   Link to this

Thanks, Mary. Adding the word "vezes", absent from our text, does make the passage clear (and Sam's amatory prowess impressive).

language hat   Link to this

I add my thanks, and my respect for Sam's prowess!

Terry Foreman   Link to this

My apologies to the vezes and SP, their performer and his admirers.

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