Map

The overlays that highlight 17th century London features are approximate and derived from:

4 Annotations

Pedro   Link to this

Originally posted under Brampton.

Brampton (Port Holme Meadows)

From the "Nature Atlas of Great Britain"
Dry/Wet meadow.
The river Ouse forks to run either side of this remarkable ancient meadow. It has been managed for hay in much the same way for centuries, allowing a wonderful range of wild flowers to prosper.
The footpaths, one of which runs along a route used by nuns at Hinchingbrooke, first cross dry meadow grassland characterised by lady's bedstraw, great burnet and pepper-saxifrage. In mid-summer the distinctive sound of yellow rattle seed heads will be heard as you brush past them. Wetter, lower lying parts in the middle have tubular water-dropwort, meadowsweet and marsh ragwort.
The river supports dragonflies including the scarce chaser. May and June are the best.
Flowers include fritillary, great yellow-cress, and meadow cranesbill. Birds include the corn bunting.

Cumgranissalis   Link to this

see Brampton http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/1768/

Cumgranissalis   Link to this

"...Portholme and viewed all the fields, which was very pleasant...." Lots of comment.
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1661/07/14/#c20922

Bill   Link to this

Forty yards under the second railway bridge from the left bank a narrow stream leaves the river, and just by it we arrive at Portholme; this is a very large meadow being over 3 1/2 miles round, belonging chiefly to the Earl of Sandwich, the Duke of Manchester, and a few other gentlemen; it is entirely surrounded by water.
---Fishing, Fish Culture & the Aquarium. 1890.

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References

  • 1661
  • 1662
  • 1664
  • 1668