Monday 18 July 1664

Up, and walked to my Lord’s, and there took my leave of him, he seeming very friendly to me in as serious a manner as ever in his life, and I believe he is very confident of me. He sets out this morning for Deale. Thence to St. James’s to the Duke, and there did our usual business. He discourses very freely of a warr with Holland, to begin about winter, so that I believe we shall come to it. Before we went up to the Duke, Sir G. Carteret and I did talk together in the Parke about my Lord Chancellor’s business of the timber; he telling me freely that my Lord Chancellor was never so angry with him in all his life, as he was for this business, in great passion; and that when he saw me there, he knew what it was about. And plots now with me how we may serve my Lord, which I am mightily glad of; and I hope together we may do it. Thence to Westminster to my barber’s, to have my Periwigg he lately made me cleansed of its nits, which vexed me cruelly that he should put such a thing into my hands. Here meeting his mayd Jane, that has lived with them so long, I talked with her, and sending her of an errand to Dr. Clerk’s, did meet her, and took her into a little alehouse in Brewers Yard, and there did sport with her, without any knowledge of her though, and a very pretty innocent girl she is. Thence to my Lord Chancellor’s, but he being busy I went away to the ‘Change, and so home to dinner. By and by comes Creed, and I out with him to Fleet Street, and he to Mr. Povy’s, I to my Lord Chancellor’s, and missing him again walked to Povy’s, and there saw his new perspective in his closet. Povy, to my great surprise and wonder, did here attacque me in his own and Mr. Bland’s behalf that I should do for them both for the new contractors for the victualling of the garrison. Which I am ashamed that he should ask of me, nor did I believe that he was a man that did seek benefit in such poor things. Besides that he professed that he did not believe that I would have any hand myself in the contract, and yet here declares that he himself would have profit by it, and himself did move me that Sir W. Rider might join, and Ford with Gauden. I told him I had no interest in them, but I fear they must do something to him, for he told me that those of the Mole did promise to consider him. Thence home and Creed with me, and there he took occasion to owne his obligations to me, and did lay down twenty pieces in gold upon my shelf in my closett, which I did not refuse, but wish and expected should have been more. But, however, this is better than nothing, and now I am out of expectation, and shall henceforward know how to deal with him. After discourse of settling his matters here, we went out by coach, and he ‘light at the Temple, and there took final leave of me, in order to his following my Lord to-morrow. I to my Lord Chancellor, and discoursed his business with him. I perceive, and he says plainly, that he will not have any man to have it in his power to say that my Lord Chancellor did contrive the wronging the King of his timber; but yet I perceive, he would be glad to have service done him therein; and told me Sir G. Carteret hath told him that he and I would look after his business to see it done in the best manner for him. Of this I was glad, and so away. Thence home, and late with my Tangier men about drawing up their agreement with us, wherein I find much trouble, and after doing as much as we could to-night, broke up and I to bed.

28 Annotations

Terry F   Link to this

"to my barber's, to have my Periwigg he lately made me cleansed of its nits, which vexed me cruelly that he should put such a thing into my hands." Oy! http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/civil_war_...

Australian Susan   Link to this

Sam should try lavender oil! See http://www.joys-of-lavender.com/history-of-lave...

Terry F   Link to this

July 18, 1635 - Robert Hooke, b.

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

Sounds to me as if Povy doesn't consider Sam to be in the same league with him ("Besides that he professed that he did not believe that I would have any hand myself in the contract, and yet here declares that he himself would have profit by it") ... I wonder if this attitude engendered an "I'll show *him*!" attitude in Sam that would explain his later treatment of Povy.

Patricia   Link to this

" and a very pretty innocent girl she is." And long may she stay that way, by keeping out of Sam's clutches!

cape henry   Link to this

"...to have my Periwigg he lately made me cleansed of its nits, which vexed me cruelly that he should put such a thing into my hands." Is this a case of the barber being blamed for something that may not be his fault?Since lice require blood to live and reproduce, it seems unlikely that they would inhabit the inert materials of a wig unless and until it was being regularly worn.They are extremely successful and persistent creatures in the narrow environment in which they thrive, but unadaptable and short lived beyond it.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Sir G. Carteret and I did talk together in the Parke about my Lord Chancellor's business of the timber; he telling me freely that my Lord Chancellor was never so angry with him in all his life, as he was for this business, in great passion; and that when he saw me there, he knew what it was about. And plots now with me how we may serve my Lord, which I am mightily glad of; and I hope together we may do it. ...and told me Sir G. Carteret hath told him that he and I would look after his business to see it done in the best manner for him."

So it seems Clarendon was merely rattling cages to get his timber reserved...And is well aware he is in the wrong here. Never thought I'd feel sorry for the clever Carteret; Clarendon seems to be sinking to a pretty low level in the matter.

***

"Which I am ashamed that he should ask of me, nor did I believe that he was a man that did seek benefit in such poor things."

No doubt Povy has done so well exactly by seeking benefit in such poor things...As increasingly is our hero. For his part, Thomas P. is probably a bit miffed that he should have to put his hand out...To his thinking, I imagine, Sam should have offered a proper cut without a request being necessary.

***

"...late with my Tangier men about drawing up their agreement with us, wherein I find much trouble..."

Well, Sam you are getting a year's salary's worth of compensation.

Brian   Link to this

"Povy, to my great surprise and wonder, did here attacque me in his own and Mr. Bland's behalf"

I guess I hadn't realized what a competition it was for the (lucrative) victualing contract. Sam and "his" men beat out other groups, and now these other folks want a piece of the action. Seems like The Godfather, circa 1664 . . .

Cumsalisgrano   Link to this

Supplin' vituals to a well heeled government in time of conflick, be always a good deal, for those that do not get the contract then there be suppling those that went without as the market forces be in play.
The hoi polloi be stiffed as usual.

Nutin' has changed.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Once upon a time your Sam had plenty of nothing,
Which was sorta ok with me.
Because I had friends, music, love,
The sun, the stars, and the moon above,
Had the clear blue sky, and the deep blue sea.
That was when the best things in life were free.

Then time went by and now I got plenty of plenty,
Which is fine with me.
'Cause I still got love, Pembleton's given me rhythm,
And look at what I got to go with 'em.
Who could ask for anything More I hear ye query...
Who could ask for anything More, well let me tell ye, dearie...

Got my Navy house, got my (cleaned) wigs...Got a lass I adore...

I'm so happy with what I got...I want More!

I count my blessings, one, two, three
You know I love keeping score.
Every number is fine with me
As long as it's more
As long as it's more!

So I've got rhythm, music too, just as much as before
Got my girl and my sky of blue,
Now, however, I'll soon own the view.
More is better than nothing, true
But nothing's better than more, more, more
Nothing's better than more.

One is fun, why not two?
And if you like two, you might as well have four,
And if you like four, why not a few
Why not a slew
[More! More!]

If you've got a little, why not a lot?
Add and bit and it'll get to be an oodle.
Every jot and tittle adds to the pot
Soon you've got the kit as well as the caboodle.
[More! More!]

Each new gold piece I possess...Maketh my spirit to soar.

That's what's soothing about success
Never settle for something less.
Something's better than nothing, yes!
But nothing's better than more, more, more
Nothing's better than...More...

Except all, all, all...

Except once you have it all [have it all]
You may find all else a bore [find all else a bore]
Cause though things are bliss,
There's one thing you miss, and that's...
More! More!
More! More! More! More!
More! More! More!"

Australian Susan   Link to this

RG - another gem! Thanks!

JWB   Link to this

Terry, by your leave:
http://www.micrographia.com/specbiol/insec/lous...

Terry F   Link to this

Thanks, JWB, for linking my posts.

MissAnn   Link to this

OK - "... and there did sport with her, without any knowledge of her though, and a very pretty innocent girl she is." - just what does he mean? Will she retain her innocence after an encounter with Sam? The "did sport with her" particulary worries me.

Now, I know that as an ageing blonde I quite often mis-read things, but I can't get my poor old head around "... and there saw his new perspective in his closet" - would this be a viewing of the Lord Chancellor's head through a window maybe? Anyone wish to interpret this for me? Please ...

RG - which particular piece of music goes with this, it's so obviously a song, when will you be putting it up on the web?

Mary   Link to this

war with Holland to begin about winter.

Does it strike anyone else as odd that this time of year should be chosen for embarking on a war with another seafaring nation? The North Sea is not noted for its benign weather during the winter months.

andy   Link to this

saw his new perspective in his closet

perspective = painting of a landscape, I think. And in a private room not the WC.

Without knowledge of her = without carnal knowledge of her, just groping her.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Indeed it is, Miss Ann... It's a few new verses to the song "More", probably most familiar from the film "Dick Tracy".

Bradford   Link to this

And why does one suspect that however many pieces of gold Povy laid upon his shelf---can't you see Pepys's eyes tracking the hand as it moves from back and forth from the pouch, and wondering which piece will be the last?---it would have been short of "enough"?

Terry F   Link to this

Povy's "perspectives"

Pepys reported 29 May 1664 on two tromp l'oeil paintings Povy had: one on a wall (by Robert Streeter, say L&M), and one in a closet. Michael Robinson's annote w/ link to a nice one: http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1664/05/29/#c13...

Cumsalisgrano   Link to this

RG: More than delightful:
'tis wot keeps the world a spinnin'.
This be the age of getting proportions correctly, with seeking pearls and Vemeer with his little hole in the wall.
The prospect of getting more be the code word of the day.
Why winter?: Prospect of the old salts [senex salis], they be looking to the prevailing winds and waves to push them there Hollanders back up into the Sheldt, and then flush them out one at a time.

tonyt   Link to this

'War with Holland to begin about winter'.

It seems to me likely, Mary, that this is the Duke speculating on when things would be coming to a head rather than any serious consideration of actually starting combat in mid-winter.

Here is what his brother the King was writing to their sister in Paris a few days earlier (July 14th)
'I am now sending Sir George Downing into Holland to make my demands there. They have never yet given me any satisfaction for all the injuries their subjects have done to mine, only given good words and nothing else, which now will not be sufficient, for I will have full satisfaction one way or other.'

(Charles went on to briefly describe Dutch losses in Japan and China with the comment that this 'will cool the courage of the East India Company at Amsterdam, who are yet very impertinent.')

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Interesting...So Charles was not without some reasonably good intelligence on the Dutch global empire.

***

I wonder if the Duke is thinking a winter start in terms of Dutch East India ships nearly home, loaded with priceless items and vulnerable? Would the great trading ships be arriving home about then or did they prefer to be in port by autumn?

Nix   Link to this

"reasonably good intelligence on the Dutch global empire" --

Of course. No competent ruler would ever go to war without having good intellingence regarding his adversary, right?

language hat   Link to this

"why does one suspect that however many pieces of gold Povy laid upon his shelf... it would have been short of 'enough'?"

I don't think so. I think Pepys had a "proper" amount in his head, and if Povy had matched it he would have been satisfied. Since Povy couldn't read Pepys' mind, he provided what seemed to him a proper amount; unfortunately, he and Pepys had different ideas on the subject, and he's going to suffer for it. This is the trouble with wink-wink-nudge-nudge under-the-table commission/kickback systems. Much better if everyone's on salary and everyone knows what the score is.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Well, actually it was Creed laying the gold on the study shelf, Pepys' long anticipated payoff for his help in passing his accounts. Povy is, with his usual gentlemanly politeness, asking for his cut of the Tangier victual kickbacks.

language hat   Link to this

Sorry, wasn't paying attention!

Michael Robinson   Link to this

"warr with Holland, to begin about winter, ..."

The technology of the age permitted beer to be brewed and meat packed only in the winter months so to victual a summer fleet it was necessary to 'declare' the proposed number of men, and issue the necessary money, the prior autumn.

Rodger, Command of The Ocean, pp 41-2.

jeannine   Link to this

Sandwich's Journals,

After a lapse, Sandwich begins writing in his journal again today and continues to do so through most of the Second Ducth War. I'll post a few entries over the next few days to give an idea of his 'style" (factual, recording of ship mpovement, etc.) and then from time to time if anything that looks like it may be of interest appears, I'll try to get that posted too. From "Journal of the Earl of Sandwich" edited by R.C. Anderson, today's entry reads:

July 18th. Monday. In the morning I crossed the Thames at Lambeth. Went to the Archbishop to take my leave. About Southwark met the King, Duke of Ormond and Mr Secretary Bennett in the coach coming from Greenwich. And I lay that night at Rochester, where I went and viewed the ships.

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