Annotations and comments

Chris Squire UK has posted 334 annotations/comments since 16 February 2013.

The most recent…


Comments

About Friday 18 July 1662

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘wainscot, n. < Middle Low German wagenschot .
2. Panel-work of oak or other wood, used to line the walls of an apartment.
. . a1616 Shakespeare As you like It (1623) iii. i. 79 This fellow wil but ioyne you together, as they ioyne Wainscot, then one of you wil proue a shrunke pannell.
. . 1711 J. Addison Spectator No. 235. ¶2 A certain Person..who when he is pleased with any thing that is acted upon the Stage, expresses his Approbation by a loud Knock upon the Benches or the Wainscot.
1716 J. Addison Drummer i. 6 Like a Rat behind a Wainscot. . . ‘

About Thursday 17 July 1662

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has;

‘acquittance, n. < Anglo-Norman acquitance . .
1. A document showing that a debt has been paid; a receipt in full, barring further demand for payment; a written or printed release. Now hist.
. . 1672 H. Oldenburg Let. 2 May in I. Newton Corr. (1959) I. 151 Our Treasurer was not present..so yt I could not deliver him your quarters paymt: wch I shall doe the first time I find him there; and then send you his acquittance.
1684 London Gaz. mdccccxciv. 4 Lost..a File with Writings and Acquittances, supposed to be dropt not far off the Exchange, London. . . ‘

About Wednesday 16 July 1662

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

DNB has:

‘ . . Whether or not Nell herself ever aspired to promote the ‘protestant cause’ . . her political associations, in conjunction with her English birth and protestantism, meant that Nell was usually compared favourably with the duchess of Portsmouth in opposition satire, such as that of 1682, A Dialogue between the Duchess of Portsmouth and Madam Gwin at Parting, which celebrates both Nell's Britishness

In my clear veins best British bloud does flow
Whilst thou like a French tode-stool first did grow

and her relative low cost:

I neither run in court or city's score,
I pay my debts, distribute to the poor.

The well-known anecdote of Nell's coach being surrounded by an angry mob who thought she was the duchess of Portsmouth until she put her head out of the window and reassured them with the words, ‘Pray good people be silent, I am the Protestant whore’, is usually dated to March 1681 . . While the story has not been confirmed from any contemporary source, it is from about this date that the epithet ‘the protestant whore’ is applied to her in contemporary satire . . ‘

About Monday 14 July 1662

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘last, n.2 < cognate with Old Frisian . . last cargo, load, duty, unit of measure . .
. . 3. A large commercial unit of weight, capacity, or quantity, varying for different kinds of goods and in different localities . .
a. A measure for . . pitch . .a last . . was formerly . . of pitch 12 (sometimes 14) barrels . .
. . 1486 in M. Oppenheim Naval Accts. & Inventories Henry VII (1896) 15 A last of pitch and Tarre.
. . 1612 W. Symonds Proc. Eng. Colonie Virginia in Narr. Early Virginia (1907) 184 In 3 monthes, we made 3 or 4 Lasts of pitch, and tarre.
. . 2006 S. Murdoch Network North vi. 212 An associate..procured a recommendation from the British ambassador for the free export of 150 lasts of pitch from Sweden . . ‘

About Saturday 12 July 1662

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘weekend . . 3. a. The period between two working weeks, typically regarded as a time for leisure or recreation . . The usual sense. Since the advent of the five-day working week, the weekend has usually been characterized as extending from Saturday morning or Friday evening until Sunday night. During the late 19th century, a British worker's leisure period often began on Saturday at noon.
1793 W. B. Stevens Jrnl. 27 Feb. (1965) i. 70 Wrote to Dewe that I would put on my seven league boots next weekend and stretch my course to Appleby.
. . 1870 Food Jrnl. 1 Mar. 97 ‘Week-end’, that is from Saturday until Monday,—it may be a later day in the week if the money and credit hold out,—is the season of dissipation.
. . 1937 Times 26 Nov. 21/5 The letter began with old Lady Chervil's unvarying formula:—My dear Mrs. Miniver, Chervil and I shall be delighted if you and your Husband will stay with us from Friday 19th to Monday 22nd November. (She would have gone to the guillotine sooner than use the expression ‘week-end’ . . ‘

Those who didn’t have to work for a living avoided the term but I never heard of it being regarded as ’common’ in Britain.

About Friday 11 July 1662

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

As a kid, 60 years ago, I learnt up '12 twelves is 144' by heart and I notice ot this day that I don't know without thinking what, e.g. '13 nines', is but have to think and do mental arithmetic. I would have thought that someone of his quick wits, working all the time with 'farthings' (1/4 d), 'hundredweights (8 stone), 'dozens' (12), 'baker's dozens' (13 - true: I've just checked with OED), 'stones' (= 14 lb), 'ounces' (16 to a lb.), 'scores' (20), 'guineas' (21/-) and 'chains' (22 yards), etc. etc. would have mastered the tables up to 20 twenties = 400.

What do they learn nowadays? I have a quiverful of grand nieces and nephews so I will make enquiries.

About Thursday 10 July 1662

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘several, adj. < Anglo-Norman several
. . 2. Qualifying a pl. n.: Individually separate; different.
. . b. Preceded by the def. article, a possessive, etc.: Each and all of the, these, †one's (etc.) various or different.
. . 1600 Shakespeare Merchant of Venice ii. vii. 2 Draw aside the curtaines and discouer the seuerall caskets to this noble Prince.
. . 1689 W. Popple tr. J. Locke Let. conc. Toleration 52 All the several separate Congregations,..will watch one another . . ‘

About Wednesday 9 July 1662

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘coat < Middle English cote, < Old French . .
. . 6. Garb as indicating profession (e.g. clerical); hence, profession, class, order, sort, party; chiefly in such phrases as a man of his coat, one of their own coat, etc. Very common in 17th c. . .
. . 1647 T. May Hist. Parl. i. iii. 28 The Archbishop of Canterbury..a man..of a disposition too fierce and cruel for his Coat.
1686 Catholic Representer ii. 60 Reports..carried about..by Men of all Coats . . ‘

About Tuesday 8 July 1662

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘boot, n.1 < Common Germanic: Old English bót . .
I. Good, advantage, profit, use.
1. a. Good: in phrase to boot: ‘to the good’, to advantage, into the bargain, in addition; besides, moreover.
. . 1660 S. Pepys Diary 13 Feb. (1970) I. 54 For two books that I had and 6s. 6d to boot, I had my great book of songs . . ‘

About Monday 7 July 1662

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘backside, n.
. . 4. . . the reverse side or ‘back’ of a document, page, book, etc.; cf. back n.1 3, 4. Obs.
. . 1720 London Gaz. No. 5910/5 Lost..a Pocket-Book..writ on the backside John Bennett.

‘back n. . . 4. spec. . . c. The convex part of a book, opposite to the opening of the leaves. ’