Annotations and comments

Chris Squire UK has posted 731 annotations/comments since 16 February 2013.

The most recent…


Comments

About Thursday 16 June 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘ . . and there eat a messe of creame . . ‘

‘mess, n.1 < Anglo-Norman . .
I. A portion of food, and related senses.
. . 2. a. A portion or serving of liquid or pulpy food such as milk, broth, porridge, boiled vegetables, etc.

The expression a mess of pottage, alluding to the biblical story of Esau's sale of his birthright (Genesis 25:29–34), does not occur in the King James Bible (1611), although it is found in this context as early as c1452 (see quot.).

It appears in the heading of Chapter 25 in the Bibles of 1537 and 1539, and in the Geneva Bible of 1560. Coverdale (1535) does not use the phrase, either in the text or the chapter heading (his words being ‘meace of meate’, ‘meace of ryse’), but he has it in 1 Chronicles 16:3 and Proverbs 15:7.

. . a1641 T. Heywood & W. Rowley Fortune by Land & Sea (1655) iii. i Give..a word to the dayry maid for a mess of cream . . ‘

(OED)

About Wednesday 15 June 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ’ . . but did cheapen several parcels . . ’

‘cheap, v. < Germanic . .

3. a. trans. To bargain for, bid for, offer to buy, offer a price for, ask the price of, ‘price’.
. . 1631 B. Jonson Bartholmew Fayre iii. iv. 30 in Wks. II Why..stand heere..cheaping of Dogges, Birds, and Babies?’

About Monday 13 June 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ’ . . "to Greenwich, and there saw the King's works, which are great, a-doing there" . . ’

‘work, n.< a Germanic base cognate with ancient Greek ἔργον piece of work . .
. . 13. b. Chiefly Brit. In pl. Building or engineering operations.
. . 1660 J. Evelyn Diary anno 1641 (1955) II. 58 The new Citadell was advancing with innumerable hands... I was permitted to walke the round, and view the Workes . .

14. Mil. A fortified building or other defensive structure, a fortification. Also (frequently in pl.): any of the sides, walls, etc., of such a structure. Cf. bulwark n.
. . 1669 P. Staynred Compend. Fortification 4 in S. Sturmy Mariners Mag. There may be..occasion in Forts to raise..Platforms, or Batteries, to command all the other Works . . ‘

Re: ‘ . . sorts mightily with my genius . . ’

‘genius, n. and adj. < classical Latin . .
. . 7. b. Natural ability or capacity; quality of mind; attributes which suit a person for his or her peculiar work. Also: an instance of this.
. . 1729 B. Franklin Modest Enq. 17 Different Men have Genius's adapted to Variety of different Arts and Manufactures . . ‘

About Sunday 12 June 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: sea freedom quote:

A google search readily reveals the source to be the Universal Magazine of Knowledge and Pleasure, vol 6, 1750, July 1750, p. 18; taken from The History Of England, p. 324, Vol 6 (no further details given).

The occasion was the Spanish ambassador’s protest after Drake’s return from his ‘astonishing three-year voyage around the world carrying treasure beyond imagination.’ (DNB) on 26 September 1580.

About Friday 10 June 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ’ . . and I stand indebted to him . . ’

‘indebted, adj. < . . medieval Latin . .
. . 3. a. Under obligation to another for favours or services received; owing gratitude; beholden.
. . 1660 T. Willsford Scales Commerce & Trade Pref. sig. A vij All the others have nothing to glory in, but how Princes and States are indebted to them . . ‘

(OED)

About Wednesday 8 June 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

BCB: cryptogram, n.= ‘A piece of cryptographic writing; anything written in code or cipher.’ (OED)

‘ . . The seemingly impenetrable shorthand of the six volumes marked ‘journal’ discouraged examination until, it seems, the successful publication of Evelyn's diary (1818) prompted Magdalene to have Pepys's manuscript deciphered. An impecunious undergraduate of neighbouring St John's College, John Smith, was hired, and learned the characters by comparing Pepys's shorthand of Charles II's escape story with the longhand version. He did not know that the manual for the system, Thomas Shelton's Tutor to Tachygraphy (1642), was in the library . . ‘ (DNB)

Thank you, John Smith.

About Sunday 5 June 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ' . . she is taken with great gripings, . . '

griping, n.1 < gripe v.1 . . The action of gripe v.1 in various senses.
. . 1526 Bible (Tyndale) Matt. iv. f. v They brought vnto hym all sicke people, that were taken with divers diseases and gripinges. [So Coverdale, Geneva; 1611 torments.]
. .a1665 J. Goodwin Πλήρωμα τὸ Πνευματικόv (1670) ix. 260 Secret wringings, and gripings, and gnawings of Conscience.

. . gripe, v.1 < Common Germanic . .
. . 8.b. absol. To produce pain in the bowels as if by constriction or contraction; to cause ‘gripes’.
1702 J. Floyer in Philos. Trans. (Royal Soc.) 23 1171 Crato describes Sena as if it had Viscidum quid, by which it gripes . . ‘

(OED)

About Friday 3 June 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ’ . . for ought I see, being the only two that do anything like men . .’

‘aught, n.2, and pron., adj., and adv. < Old English á . . Middle English aht, aght, modern aught, the spelling now preferred as distinguishing this word from ought verb. In Shakespeare, Milton, Pope, ought and aught occur indiscriminately . .
. . a1616 Shakespeare All's Well that ends Well (1623) v. iii. 282 It might be yours or hers for ought I know.
. . 1709 Pope Chaucer's January & May in Poet. Misc.: 6th Pt. 222 Excuse me, Dear, if ought amiss was said . . ‘

(OED)

About Thursday 2 June 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: 'There they were all snapt . . '

'snap, v. < Middle Dutch . .
. . II. 5. a. trans. To catch, capture, or seize quickly, suddenly, or by surprise. Common in the 17th c.; now chiefly dial., or spec. in Cricket.
. . c1645   I. Tullie Narr. Siege of Carlisle (1840) 6   They..failed in snapping Col. Graye's small regement of horse at Stanwick . . '

About Wednesday 1 June 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ’ . . and nineteen more commission officers being killed at Tangier . . ’

‘commission, v. < Anglo-Norman . .
. . 3.b. spec. To appoint (a person) to the rank of officer in a military force. Cf. commission n.1 1b.
1646 N. Cradock Answer Just Vindic. Gentlemen of Pembrokeshire 5 Touching a Commander in chief,..the Earl of Carbery was Commissioned accordingly . . ’

whence:

‘non-commissioned, adj. . .
1. Of a subordinate officer (esp. a sergeant) in the armed services: not holding a commission, appointed from the enlisted personnel. Cf. non-commission officer n.

1648 Die Sabbathi 8 As to the whole Arrear of any private Soldier or non-Commissioned Officer,..There shall not..be any stop or delay made to the payment thereof . .’

whence:

‘NCO n. Mil. non-commissioned officer.
1803–10 Orderly Bks. of Manx Fencibles in Yn Lioar Manninagh (1890) I. 152 Any party, consisting of 6 men or upwards, must have a N.C.O...appointed to go with them. . . ‘

(OED)