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Chris Squire UK has posted 699 annotations/comments since 16 February 2013.

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About Wednesday 20 April 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘ . . my uncle coming . . almost foxed. . .’

‘fox v. < fox, n.< Common Germanic . .
. . 2. a. trans. To intoxicate, befuddle. Also (? nonce-use), to redden (one's nose) with drinking.
. . 1660 S. Pepys Diary 26 Oct. (1970) I. 274 The last of whom I did almost fox with Marget ale . . ‘

About Thursday 14 April 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has a list of ‘King’s . . ‘ phrases from ‘King’s Advocate’ to ‘king’s yellow’ (= arsenic trisulphide): ’King’s profit’ is not in it but ‘King’s purse’ is:

‘king's purse n. now hist. the royal treasury; the funds or revenue of a king.
. . 1651 Life & Reigne King Charls 28 What by sales procured by her solicitations, as much more was yearly drayned out of the Kings purse . . ‘

I suggest that it was an SP coinage which he was trying out in the diary before trying it on his peers: evidently they didn’t adopt it, perhaps they couldn’t grasp his meaning; after the Glorious Revolution (just 24 years in the future) it would only be used by Tories and Jacobites while the Whigs preferred a neutral phrase with republican overtones such as the ‘Public Purse’, which goes with that that mysterious entity still invoked today - the Public Interest.

About Wednesday 13 April 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘ . . what a deale he hath!!’

‘deal, n.1 < Germanic . .
. . 4. a deal is used pregnantly for a good or great deal, etc.; an undefined, but considerable or large quantity (rarely number); a ‘lot’. colloq.
. . a1616   Shakespeare Twelfth Night (1623) iii. i. 143   O what a deale of scorne, lookes beautifull? In the contempt and anger of his lip. 
. . 1740   S. Richardson Pamela I. xxii. 56   He and Mrs. Jervis had a deal of Talk, as she told me . . ‘

About Thursday 7 April 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘ . . a pleasant French fricassee of veal . . ’

‘fricassee, n. < French
1. Meat sliced and fried or stewed and served with sauce. Now usually a ragout (highly seasoned stew) of small animals or birds cut in pieces.
. . 1656 Perfect Eng. Cooke 3 To make a Fregacy of Lamb or Veal.
1677 J. Phillips tr. J.-B. Tavernier Persian Trav. iii. i. 101 in tr. J.-B. Tavernier Six Voy. (1678) Little Birds..of which we caught enow to make a lusty Fricassie .. .

2. (See quot. 1611.) Obs. rare—1.
. . [1611 R. Cotgrave Dict. French & Eng. Tongues Fricassee,.. a kind of charge for a Morter, or murdering peece, of stones, bullets, nailes, and peeces of old yron closed together with grease, and gun~powder.]

3. A kind of dance: see quot. 1775. Obs. rare—1.
1775 Mrs. Harris in Priv. Lett. Ld. Malmesbury (1870) I. 294 A new dance at the Festino, called the Fricasée..begins with an affront, then they fight and fire pistols, then they are reconciled, embrace, and so ends the dance.’

About Thursday 7 April 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘ . . a pleasant French fricassee of veal . . ’

‘fricassee, n. < French
1. Meat sliced and fried or stewed and served with sauce. Now usually a ragout (highly seasoned stew) of small animals or birds cut in pieces.
. . 1656 Perfect Eng. Cooke 3 To make a Fregacy of Lamb or Veal.
1677 J. Phillips tr. J.-B. Tavernier Persian Trav. iii. i. 101 in tr. J.-B. Tavernier Six Voy. (1678) Little Birds..of which we caught enow to make a lusty Fricassie .. .

2. (See quot. 1611.) Obs. rare—1.
. . [1611 R. Cotgrave Dict. French & Eng. Tongues Fricassee,.. a kind of charge for a Morter, or murdering peece, of stones, bullets, nailes, and peeces of old yron closed together with grease, and gun~powder.]

3. A kind of dance: see quot. 1775. Obs. rare—1.
1775 Mrs. Harris in Priv. Lett. Ld. Malmesbury (1870) I. 294 A new dance at the Festino, called the Fricasée..begins with an affront, then they fight and fire pistols, then they are reconciled, embrace, and so ends the dance.’

About Friday 8 April 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘ . . the business of the poop lanterns, . .’

‘poop, n.1 < Middle French . .
1. a. The aftermost part of a ship; the stern; the aftermost and highest deck often forming (esp. in a wooden ship) the roof of a cabin in the stern.

. . poop lantern n. a lantern carried at the stern of a ship to serve as a signal at night.
. . 1651 Severall Proc. Parl. No. 87. 1328 They..have shot most of all our Riggins to peeces,..and shot all the Caben and Stern, and the poope Lanthorn also.
1698 E. Ward London Spy I. ii. 9 The Brawny Topers..began..to forsake the Tavern, and Stagger, haulking, after a Poop-Lanthorn, to their own House . . ‘
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Re: ‘ . . the contract with the platerer . . ’

‘platerer, n. Obs. rare. A person employed in the application of metal plate or plates; one who manufactures metal plates.
1664 S. Pepys Diary 8 Apr. (1971) V. 117 What I have done in the contract with the platerer.
1877 Times 6 Apr. 13/1 (advt.) Iron platerer's wares, black ironmongery, ironmonger's sundries.’
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(OED)

About Saturday 9 April 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘ . . a glass or two of Hypocras . . ‘

‘Hypocras Obs. exc. Hist. or arch.
 1. A cordial drink made of wine flavoured with spices, formerly much in vogue.
………….
Re: ‘ . . by the help of Mithrydate . . ‘

‘Mithrydate < Mithridātēs, king of Pontus (died c 63 b.c.), who was said to have rendered himself proof against poisons by the constant use of antidotes
1. a. Any of various medicinal preparations, usually in the form of an electuary (= paste) compounded of many ingredients, believed to be a universal antidote to poison or a panacea. Now hist.
. . 1600 R. Surflet tr. C. Estienne & J. Liébault Maison Rustique iii. xxxiii. 495 Some make a soueraigne mithridate against the plague..with two old walnuts, three figges [etc.].
1686 T. D'Urfey Common-wealth of Women v. ii. 47 Fools may talk of Mythridate, Cordials, Elixers . .
………….
(OED)

About Wednesday 6 April 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘ . . I smelling the business, . . ’

‘smell, v. < Early Middle English . .
. . 2. a. To perceive as if by smell; esp. to detect, discern, or discover by natural shrewdness, sagacity, or instinct; to suspect, to have an inkling of, to divine.
. . 1668 S. Pepys Diary 30 Aug. (1976) IX. 295 Lord Brouncker, who I perceive, and the rest, doth smell that it came from me, but dare not find fault with it . . ‘
………..
Re: ‘ . . he had been serviceable to my brother . . ’
‘serviceable, adj. < Old French . .
. . 3. a. Of persons: Profitable, useful.
1660 F. Brooke tr. V. Le Blanc World Surveyed 280 A dead man is often more serviceable to the living, than the living themselves . . ‘

……….

(OED)

About Monday 4 April 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘ . . But she . . is . . very high-spirited.’

‘high-spirited, adj. . .
1. Originally: having or exhibiting great courage or spirit; stout-hearted, brave. Later: full of energy; lively (and difficult to control); cheerfully vivacious.
. . 1660 Milton Readie Way Free Commonw. 17 Of all governments a Commonwealth aims most to make the people flourishing, vertuous, noble and high spirited.
a1722 J. Toland Atilins Regulus in Coll. Pieces (1726) II. 35 Being a high-spirited and proud man, he broke his heart for the sudden and unusual disgrace . . ‘

(OED)

About Friday 1 April 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘ . . minds his carding . . ‘
‘carding, n.2 < . . Greek χάρτης . .
. . 1654 J. Trapp Comm. Job xxxi. 22 In Carding and Dicing he had often wished himself hanged if it were not so and so . . ‘
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Re: ‘ . . to come and be at my house a week now and then. . .’

‘now, adv., < Germanic . .
. . P.4 . . b. now and (also †or) then: occasionally, intermittently, at intervals.
. . 1623 N. Byfield Expos. Epist. Coloss. ii. v. 16 Tis not enough to doe good now or then, by flashes.
. . 1711 J. Addison Spectator No. 130. ¶3 These Gypsies now and then foretold very strange things . .

c. Similarly ‘every now and then’ (also ‘ . . again’).

1684 E. Ravenscroft Dame Dobson iv. ii. 45 Every now and then fancying a Noise, she'd say—Oh we are undone!
1712 R. Steele Spectator No. 326. ¶2, I shall every now and then have a saucy Rascal ride by reconnoitring (as I think you call it) under my windows . . ‘

Nowadays only used in sense c.
……………
(OED)