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Chris Squire UK has posted 242 annotations/comments since 16 February 2013.

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About Tuesday 14 January 1661/62

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

‘brave < Italian bravo brave, gallant, fine . .
3. loosely, as a general epithet of admiration or praise: Worthy, excellent, good, ‘capital’, ‘fine’, ‘famous’, etc.; ‘an indeterminate word, used to express the superabundance of any valuable quality in men or things’ (Johnson). arch. (Cf. braw adj.)
. . b. of things.
. . 1653 I. Walton Compl. Angler 104 We wil make a brave Breakfast with a piece of powdered Bief.
1798 R. Southey Eng. Eclogues ii, Here she found..a brave fire to thaw her . . ‘ [OED]

About Monday 13 January 1661/62

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED offers:

‘ . . 10. h. (Prince) Rupert's Drops : see quots.

1662 C. Merrett tr. A. Neri Art of Glass 353 An Account of the Glass drops. These Drops were first brought into England by His Highness Prince Rupert out of Germany.
1753 Chambers's Cycl. Suppl. Rupert's Drops, a sort of glass drops with long and slender tails, which burst to pieces, on the breaking off those tails in any parts.
1833 N. Arnott Elem. Physics (ed. 5) II. i. 24 A toy called a Prince Rupert's Drop (a pear-shaped lump of glass with a slender stalk).’

About Sunday 12 January 1661/62

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘rate, v.1 Origin unknown . .
1. trans. To scold, berate, or rebuke vehemently or angrily . .
a. With a person as object . .
. . 1605 W. Camden Remaines i. 229 The Bishop being angrie, rated the fellow roughly.
. . 1720 D. Defoe Mem. Cavalier 94 The King was in some Passion at his Men, and rated them for running away . . ‘

About Friday 10 January 1661/62

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘gossip, n. . . Old English godsibb < god god n. and int. + sib akin, related = Old Norse guð-sefe . .
1. One who has contracted spiritual affinity with another by acting as a sponsor at a baptism.
a. In relation to the person baptized: A godfather or godmother; a sponsor. Now only arch. and dial.
. . a1684 J. Evelyn Diary anno 1649 (1955) II. 567 The Parents being so poore, that they had provided no Gosships.
1689 R. Milward Selden's Table-talk 44 Should a great Lady, that was invited to be a Gossip, in her place send her Kitchin-Maid . . ‘

About Wednesday 1 January 1661/62

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

DNB has:

‘Penn, Sir William (bap. 1621, d. 1670), naval officer, was baptized in St Thomas's Church, Bristol, on 23 April 1621, the son of Giles Penn, a seaman and merchant of the city . . ’

‘Penn, William (1644–1718), Quaker leader and founder of Pennsylvania, was born in the liberty of the Tower of London on 14 October 1644, the son of Sir William Penn . .

Penn entered Christ Church, Oxford, in 1660 as a gentleman commoner. . . By the winter of 1661 Penn left Oxford and went to the continent, ostensibly to escape the political controversy that was arising from the stringent enforcement of the Act of Uniformity on the university which even required students to wear surplices . . ‘

About Friday 27 December 1661

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘1. Archaeol. A treasury, as of a temple, etc. . .

2. a. A ‘treasury’ or ‘storehouse’ of knowledge, as a dictionary, encyclopædia, or the like.
[1565 T. Cooper (title) Thesaurus Linguæ Romanæ et Britannicæ [etc.].
1736 R. Ainsworth (title) Thesaurus Linguæ Latinæ compendiarius; or..Dictionary of the Latin Tongue.] . .

b. A collection of concepts or words arranged according to sense; also (U.S.) a dictionary of synonyms and antonyms.
1852 Roget (title) Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases classified and arranged [etc.] . .

. . c. A classified list of terms, esp. key-words, in a particular field, for use in indexing and information retrieval.
1957 H. Brownson in Proc. Internat. Study Conference on Classification for Information Retrieval 100 The best answer..may be the application of a mechanized thesaurus based on networks of related meanings . . ‘

About Friday 20 December 1661

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘coxcomb . . 3. a. A fool, simpleton (obs.); now, a foolish, conceited, showy person, vain of his accomplishments, appearance, or dress; a fop; ‘a superficial pretender to knowledge or accomplishments’ (Johnson).
. . 1667 S. Pepys Diary 13 Feb. (1974) VIII. 59 A vain coxcomb..he is, though he sings and composes so well.’

I think ‘A fool, simpleton’ is the meaning here.

About Friday 13 December 1661

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

ˈdead colour The first or preparatory layer of colour in a painting.
. . 1672 C. Beale Pocket-bk. in H. Walpole Vertue's Anecd. Painting (1763) III. i. 70, 5 June, Dr. Tillotson sat..to Mr. Lely for him to lay in a dead colour of his picture.
. . 1901 Scribner's Monthly Aug. 255/1 There was, indeed, an early method employed by painters of laying in their pictures in what they were pleased to term ‘dead color’, as a kind of foundation or preparation for their succeeding painting.’