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Chris Squire UK has posted 520 annotations/comments since 16 February 2013.

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About Monday 13 July 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

‘She . . had a yellow plume in her hat (which all took notice of), and . . very melancholy’

The meaning here is clearly:

‘ . . 2. fig. a. Affected with jealousy, jealous . . Also in allusive phrases, as to wear yellow hose = to be jealous. Obs.
. . 1623 P. Massinger Duke of Millaine iv. ii. sig. I1v, If I were The Duke..I should weare yellow breeches.
. . c1680 Man's Felicity xiii, My Wife will wear no yellow hose . . ‘

About Wednesday 8 July 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

-- when did the term "night soil men" come into use?

OED has:

‘night soil, n. Human excrement removed (esp. at night) from cesspools, outdoor privies, etc.
. . 1756 in J. Fielding Extr. Penal Laws (1762) xliii. 187 If any Person shall put or cast any Night Soil out of any Cart,..he shall be committed for any Time not exceeding one Month . . ‘
1994 R. Davies Cunning Man 89 Surely the collection of garbage, or even of night-soil, would be the fate of one who did not pass his university entrance.

. . night-soil man n.
1844 Mechanics' Mag. 5 Oct. 235/2 This information ought not to be lost upon the night-soil men of London and other large cities, but still more should it engage the attention of the Commissioners of Sewers.’
………….
‘what will become of the corn this year . . ’

OED has:

‘corn, n.1 < Common Germanic . .
. . II. spec. The fruit of the cereals.
3. a. collective sing. The seed of the cereal or farinaceous plants as a produce of agriculture; grain. As a general term the word includes all the cereals, wheat, rye, barley, oats, maize, rice, etc., and, with qualification (as black corn, pulse corn), is extended to leguminous plants, as pease, beans, etc., cultivated for food. Locally, the word, when not otherwise qualified, is often understood to denote that kind of cereal which is the leading crop of the district; hence in the greater part of England ‘corn’ is = wheat n., in North Britain and Ireland = oats; in the U.S. the word, as short for Indian corn n., is restricted to maize.
. . 1600 R. Surflet tr. C. Estienne & J. Liébault Maison Rustique v. vii. 668 Grounds that are to be sowen with corne, that is to say with rie corne, maslin, some kind of barlie, Turkie corne & such others whereof bread is made, and especially..wheate corne.
1767 Jrnl. Voy. H.M.S. Dolphin 143 Rice is the only corn that grows in the island.
1774 T. Percival Ess. Med. & Exper. (1776) III. 62 Wheat..so lately has it been cultivated in Lancashire, that it has scarcely yet acquired the name of corn, which in general is applied only to barley, oats, and rye . .

4. a. Applied collectively to the cereal plants while growing, or, while still containing the grain.
1623 Shakespeare & J. Fletcher Henry VIII v. iv. 31 Her Foes shake like a Field of beaten Corne .
. . 1861 Times 4 Oct. 7/4 The corn is all cut, with the exception of a few late pieces.’

About Monday 6 July 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

re: ‘ . . he had his tallys up . . ’

A tally came in 2 bits - he had ‘tallies of pro’ from the Navy Office in settlement of his expense account; the other halves, ‘tallies of sol’, were sent to the tax collecting office that was to pay him in ready money. To get his money he had had to present his bit to that office which would pay him if and when they had the other bit and some cash. I take ‘up’ to mean that he’d been ‘paid in tallies’ in full - which was not the same as being paid in full in ready money as the first quote makes clear.

OED has:
‘tally, n.1 < Anglo-Latin . .
1. a. A stick or rod of wood, usually squared, marked on one side with transverse notches representing the amount of a debt or payment. The rod being cleft lengthwise across the notches, the debtor and creditor each retained one of the halves, the agreement or tallying of which constituted legal proof of the debt, etc.
. . 1776 A. Smith Inq. Wealth of Nations I. ii. ii. 385 In 1696 tallies had been at forty, and fifty, and sixty per cent. discount, and bank notes at twenty per cent.
1847 J. Francis Hist. Bank Eng. iv. 59 Tallies lay bundled up like Bath faggots in the hands of brokers, and stock-jobbers.
1848 J. J. S. Wharton Law Lexicon (at cited word), The use of tallies in the Exchequer was abolished by 23 Geo. III c. 82, and the old tallies were ordered to be destroyed by 4 & 5 Wm. IV c. 15.
1892 W. R. Anson Law & Custom of Constit. II. vii. ii. §1. 310 In 1834..orders were given to destroy the tallies. They were used as fuel in the stoves which warmed the Houses of Parliament; they overheated the flues, and burned down the Houses.’

So they did, bequeathing us the present unique ramshackle Palace of Westminster. http://www.parliament.uk/about/living-heritage/...

‘ . . c. tally of pro (i.e. pro, for or in favour of some one), tally of sol (i.e. solutum, paid) . .
. . 1696 London Gaz. No. 3157/4 Lost..a Tally of Pro, dated the 18th of May 1695, in the Name of John Richards, Esq; for 300 l. struck on the Commissioners of His Majesty's Hereditary and Temporary Revenues of Excise.
. . 1843 Fourth Rep. Dep. Kpr. App. ii. 166 The Tally of Pro..operated as a modern cheque on a banker, being given forth in payment from the Exchequer, as a charge upon some public accountant, for him to pay the sum expressed thereon, out of the revenues in his hands . . ‘

About Saturday 4 July 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: "he told us of one wipe the Queen a little while ago did give her":

OED has:

‘wipe, n. < Old English . .
. . 3. fig. A cutting remark; a sarcastic reproof or rebuff; a jeer, jibe.
. . a1652 A. Wilson Hist. Great Brit. (1653) 96 The Lord Treasurer gave him a wipe, for suffering his Coachman to ride bare before him in the streets.
. . 1705 J. Vanbrugh Confederacy v. ii, So, that's a wipe for me now, because I did not give her a New-Years-Gift last time . . ‘

About Saturday 4 July 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: "...beat by the most ordinary fellows..." and “ . . the military men that had served under Cromwell, who he thought were the best officers he had ever seen . . ", recall: “I had rather have a plain russet-coated captain that knows what he fights for, and loves what he knows, than that which you call a gentleman and is nothing else.” (Letter from Cromwell to Sir William Spring. Sept. 1643.)

About Friday 3 July 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘clink, n.2 < The evidence appears to indicate that the name was proper to the Southwark ‘Clink’, and thence transferred elsewhere; but the converse may have been the fact. If the name was originally descriptive, various senses of clink . . might have given rise to it . . later used elsewhere . . for a small and dismal prison or prison-cell . . Now used generally for: prison, cells.
c1530 A. Barclay Egloges i. sig. F, Then art thou clappyd in the flete or clynke.
. . 1691 A. Wood Athenæ Oxonienses I. 325 Our author..was committed first to the Gatehouse in Westminster, and afterwards to the Clink in Southwark.
. . 1890 R. Kipling Barrack-room Ballads (1892) 20 And I'm here in the Clink for a thundering drink and blacking the Corporal's eye . . ‘

‘clink, v.2 < Northern form corresponding to clinch n.1 . . trans. To clench, rivet, fix or fasten with nails or rivets.’

‘clinch, n.1< A variant of clench n. . .
. . 1. A fastening in which the end of a nail is turned over and driven back into the substance through which it has passed, or in which the end of a bolt is beaten down and flattened upon a metal ring or washer put round it for the purpose . . ‘

About Tuesday 30 June 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘balk < Common Germanic . .
. . II. 2. b. fig. To pass over, overlook, refrain from noticing (what comes in one's way); to shirk, ignore.
c1440 Promptorium Parvulorum 22 Balkyn, or ouerskyppyn, omitto.
. . 1656 R. Sanderson 20 Serm. 160 The spying of motes in our brother's eye, and baulking of beams in our own.
1741 S. Richardson Pamela III. ix. 42 Let me tell you, (nor will I balk it) my Brother..will want one Apology for his Conduct . . ‘

About Tuesday 30 June 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘policy, n.1 < Middle French . .
5. a. Prudent conduct . . Formerly also: †cunning, craftiness (obs.).
Now generally merged in sense 4, e.g. in the proverbial phrase honesty is the best policy, originally in this sense, now usually understood as in sense 4.
. . 1533 T. More Debellacyon Salem & Bizance i. v. f. xxxiiiiv, I wyll peraduenture..here after..vse the same cyrcumspeccyon and polycye that I lerne of his ensample here.
1587 J. Higgins Mirour for Magistrates (new ed.) Malin x, Secretly by pollecy and sleight Hee slewe mee with his swoord, before I wist . .

b. spec. Political prudence . . Formerly also: †political cunning (obs.). Now rare.
. . 1598 Shakespeare Henry IV, Pt. 1 i. iii. 107 Neuer did bare and rotten pollicy Colour her working with such deadly wounds.
c1650 J. Spalding Memorialls Trubles Scotl. & Eng. (1851) II. 427 Bot heirin wes deip policie, as efter do appeir . . ‘

It’s ‘cunning’ that applies here. Once again we find SP using a word in a sense that was already obsolescent in his day and is now completely obsolete.