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Chris Squire UK has posted 499 annotations/comments since 16 February 2013.

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About Monday 15 June 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

As a farmer’s son, I know that ‘beast’ is the current generic for bovines of unspecified gender and emasculation (“Are they bullocks or bulls? Can you see their dangly bits?”).

OED has:

‘beast, n. < Old French beste . .
. . 3. A domesticated animal owned and used as part of farm ‘stock’ or cattle; at first including sheep, goats, etc., but gradually more or less restricted to the bovine kind; now chiefly applied by farmers, graziers, etc. to fatting cattle . .
. . 1863 J. C. Atkinson Whitby Gloss. Beast, an..animal of the Ox kind . . applied to Cows or fatting-stock collectively.
1865 Daily Tel. 22 Aug. 6/5 One half..is devoted to ‘beasts’; the other half to sheep, pigs, and calves, none of which creatures are ‘beasts’ according to the natural history of the Caledonian-road . . ‘

About Thursday 18 June 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘retrenchment, n.2 < Middle French
. . 2. b. A reduction in expenditure; a cutback.
1667 S. Pepys Diary 9 Aug. (1974) VIII. 378 We did talk of many retrenchments of charge of the Navy which he will put in practice . . ‘
…………
Peace, Retrenchment and Reform was a political slogan used in early nineteenth century British politics by Whigs, Radicals and Liberals.

About Saturday 13 June 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘throng, v. < Middle English þrange ,
. . 3. a. intr. To assemble in a group or crowd; to collect in large numbers; to crowd; also, to go in a crowd.
. . 1647 A. Cowley Wish in Mistress v, Lest men..Should hither throng..And so make a City . .

b. indirect pass. (cf. 4). Obs.
a1616 Shakespeare Timon of Athens (1623) iv. iii. 397 Ape. Ile say th' hast Gold: Thou wilt be throng'd too shortly. Tim. Throng'd too?
1663 S. Pepys Diary 13 June (1971) IV. 182 To the Royall Theatre... Here we saw ‘The Faithfull Shepheardesse’, a most simple thing and yet much thronged after.

4. trans. To crowd round and press upon; to press upon as in a crowd, to jostle. Also fig.
1534 Bible (Tyndale rev. Joye) Mark v. 24 Moche people folowed him, and thronged him . . ‘

About Friday 12 June 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘vizard, n. and adj. < visor n. by confusion of ending < Latin. Now arch.
1. a. A mask; = visor n. 2. Very common from c1560 to c1700.
. . 1655 T. Stanley Hist. Philos. I. iii. 50 Some wild young men.., lay in wait for him, attired like furies, with vizards and torches.

. . c. A mask as used to protect the face or eyes.
. . 1669 S. Pepys Diary 25 June I to my office,..to write down my journal..and did it, with the help of my vizard, and tube fixed to it, and do find it mighty manageable, but how helpful to my eyes this trial will show me

. . 5. A person wearing a visor or mask; spec. a woman of loose character wearing a mask in public, a prostitute. Obs. (Cf. vizard-mask n. 2.)
. . 1660 Exact Accompt Trial Regicides 164 Afterwards I saw the Vizards going into a Chamber there . . ‘

About Wednesday 10 June 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘take v. < Old Scandinavian . .
. . 6. trans. a. To come upon (a person) in some action or situation; esp. to catch or detect in some fault or error . .
. . 1597 T. Morley Plaine & Easie Introd. Musicke 95 In which fault you haue beene nowe thrise taken.
. .1668 T. Shadwell Sullen Lovers i. 3, I am glad I've taken you within, I come on purpose to tell you the newes, d'ye hear it.
1715 L. Theobald tr. Aristophanes Plutus v. i. 54 Whenever I was taken napping in an Enormity, you never was so kind to bear a part of the Blows that were my certain Perquisite . . ‘

The page for ‘take’ runs to 130,000 words grouped under 80 headings.

About Tuesday 9 June 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Not defined in Sasha Clarkson’s reference:

‘Parsec n. < English ‘a distance corresponding to a parallax of one second’.
A unit of length equal to the distance at which a star would have a heliocentric parallax of one second of arc, approximately equivalent to 3·086 × 10exp13 kilometres (3·26 light years).’ [OED]

About Monday 8 June 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘friend, n. and adj. < Germanic . . ‘Relative’ is the only sense of the word in the Scandinavian languages . .
. . 3. A close relation, a kinsman or kinswoman. In later use regional (chiefly Sc. and Irish English (north.)) . .
. . a1616 Shakespeare Two Gentlemen of Verona (1623) iii. i. 106 She..is promis'd by her friends Vnto a youthfull Gentleman of worth.
1672 R. Wiseman Treat. Wounds i. x. 130 The Child returned to her friends perfectly in health.
1721 J. Kelly Compl. Coll. Scotish Prov. 103 Friends agree best at a distance. By Friends here is meant Relations . . ‘

About Sunday 7 June 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘pretty < Germanic
. . 2. a. Of a person, esp. a woman or child: attractive and pleasing in appearance; good-looking, esp. in a delicate or diminutive way . .
1440 Promptorium Parvulorum (Harl. 221) 411 Praty, elegans, formosus, elegantulus, formulosus.
c1450 Alphabet of Tales (1905) II. 440 A fayr yong man..and he was so pratie & so defte at yong wommen wex evyn fond on hym.
. . 1616 S. Hieron Dignitie of Preaching (new ed.) in Wks. (1620) I. 588 As the saying is, euery thing is pretie when it is young . . ‘

Wayneman was growing up, no longer a child, which made him more attractive to Bess and less to Sam, who might have wished he could trade him in for a younger more biddable boy.

About Thursday 4 June 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

San Diego Sarah: DNB has:

‘Juxon, William (bap. 1582, d. 1663), archbishop of Canterbury, . . on his appointment as lord treasurer on 6 March 1636, . . was ex officio a member of . . the commission for the admiralty . . On 9 May 1637 he was among those nominated to the new council of war . . his presence was noted at well over 500 of these . . meetings . .

. . Given the sensitivity of the two posts he held, as lord treasurer and bishop of London, Juxon attracted remarkably little attention . . during the parliamentary reckoning against Charles I's personal rule. As Lord Falkland conceded early in the Long Parliament, Juxon ‘in an unexpected and mighty place and power … [had] expressed an equal moderation and humility, being neither ambitious before, nor proud after, either of the crozier's staff or white staff’ . . he lived for much of his time as a discreet country cleric . .

Juxon . . was ‘of a meek spirit and of a solid and steady judgement’ . . (who) preferred to work quietly within the system . . (he) had become the king's man but, for all his apparent authority, his role remained circumscribed. With that he prudently rested content.’

About Tuesday 2 June 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘deadly, adj.< Old English déadlíc
. . 8. a. Excessive, ‘terrible’, ‘awful’. colloq.
1660 S. Pepys Diary 1 Nov. (1970) I. 280 A deadly drinker he is, and grown exceeding fat.
1660 S. Pepys Diary 7 Dec. (1970) I. 312 So to the Privy Seale, where I signed a deadly number of Pardons . . ‘