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Chris Squire UK has posted 287 annotations/comments since 16 February 2013.

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About Tuesday 22 April 1662

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

April27: early English asparagus appeared in the shops last week, corresponding to April 9 in the old calendar. On the other hand 1662 was still in the Little Ice Age whereas now is in the Early Stage of Global Warming, so it was distinctly cooler then and spring sprang later.

About Monday 21 April 1662

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

’. . [Jane] Shore . . was the merriest; in More's words:

‘a proper wit had she, & could both rede wel & write, mery in company, redy & quick of aunswer, neither mute nor ful of bable, sometime taunting without displesure & not without disport . . For many he had, but her he loved, whose favour to saithe trouth … she never abused to any mans hurt, but to many a mans comfort. … And finally in many weighty sutes, she stode many men in gret stede, either for none, or very smal rewardes, & those rather gay then rich: either for that she was content with the dede selfe well done, or for that she delited to be suid unto, & to show what she was able to do wyth the king … ’‘

[DNB]

About Wednesday 23 April 1662

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘chirurgeon, n. < Old French cirurgien < cirurgía . . In later Old French serurgien . . now corruptly surgeon . . ’

and

‘project, v. < classical Latin . . prōicere to throw forth . .
. . 1. To plan, contrive, scheme.
. . †b. trans. (with infinitive). To plan or scheme to do something. Obs.
. . a1661 T. Fuller Worthies (1662) Yorks. 191 King Richard..presently projecting to repair himself by a new Marriage.
1713 C. Johnson Successful Pyrate i. i. 4 He wisely projected to transport himself, with a Cargo of Essence, Snuff and Powder, to the West Indies . .

About Sunday 13 April 1662

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

‘token, n .< Old English tácen . .
. . 15. Phrases (in which the sense of token becomes vague).
a. by the same token or (somewhat arch.) by this (or that) token : (a) on the same ground; for the same reason; in the same way; (b) (= French à telles enseignes que), ‘the proof of this being that’; introducing a corroborating circumstance, often weakened down to a mere associated fact that helps the memory or is recalled to mind by the main fact (now arch. or dial.).
Sense (a) represents the predominant modern use (and app. that current in the 15th c.). Sense (b) occurs from 1600.
. .1609 Shakespeare Troilus & Cressida i. ii. 277 Pand. I a token from Troylus: Cres: By the same token you are a Bawde.
1660 S. Pepys Diary 28 Feb. (1970) I. 70 Up in the morning, and had some red Herrings to our breakfast while my boot-heel was a-mending; by the same token, the boy left the hole as big as it was before.
1662 S. Pepys Diary 13 Apr. (1970) III. 64, I went to the Temple to church, and there heard another [sermon]. By the same token, a boy, being asleep, fell down a high seat to the ground.
1722 D. Defoe Jrnl. Plague Year 280 Others caused large Fires to be made..by the same Token..two or three were pleas'd to set their Houses on Fire, and so effectually sweetned them by burning them down to the Ground . . ‘

About Wednesday 16 April 1662

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘physic, n. < Anglo-Norman fisike . . after ancient Greek ϕυσική
1. A medicinal substance; spec. a cathartic, a purgative. Also: medicines generally. Now hist.
. . 1748 Best Method preserving Uninterrupted Health 182 The Salt in the Air..shrinks up the Fibres of their Guts, and makes them [sc. seamen] generally very costive, insomuch as to require a double quantity of physic to purge them . . ‘

‘abstract, v. < classical Latin abstrahere to drag away, to appropriate, take away, to set free, to separate, to deduct, subtract, to exclude, to turn aside, divert . .
. . 3. b. To make a written summary or abridgement of; to summarize; to abridge . .
. . 1666 Abridgm.; or, Summary Laws against Jesuites 20 To be disabled to Sue..or Prosecute any Suit in Equity, &c. As in the next precedent Statute here abstracted and abridged.
1743 B. Franklin Proposal Promoting Useful Knowl. in Papers (1960) II. 382 That the Business and Duty of the Secretary be..to abstract, correct, and methodize such Papers &c. as require it . . ‘

About Tuesday 8 April 1662

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘down . . 4. to down with: . . to have done with.
. . 1659 D. Pell Πελαγος Ded. 8 Let's down with swearing, if ever wee mean to prosper at Sea.]
1682 E. Hickeringill Wks. (1716) II. 20 Except they..down with their Dust, and ready Darby.
1712 J. Warder True Amazons 57 They down with her House . . ‘

About Sunday 6 April 1662

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:
‘salute v. . . 2. a. To greet with some gesture or visible action conventionally expressive of respect or courteous recognition.
. . 1590 Spenser Faerie Queene i. i. sig. A7, He faire the knight saluted, louting low.
. . 1728 E. Chambers Cycl. at Salutation, In England, &c. we salute one another by uncovering the Head, inclining the Body, &c. The Orientals by uncovering their Feet, laying their Hands on the Breast, &c. . . ‘

About Ticket

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘ticket, n.1 < obsolete French etiquet . .
1. a. A short written notice or document; a memorandum, a note, a billet . .
. . 1661 S. Pepys Diary 12 Apr. (1970) II. 73 While I am now writing, comes one with a tickett to invite me to Captain Robt. Blakes buriall.

. . 6. a. A pay-warrant; esp. a discharge warrant in which the amount of pay due to a soldier or sailor is certified . .
. . 1665 S. Pepys Diary 5 Dec. (1972) VI. 319 Mr. Stevens (who is..paying of seamen of their tickets at Depford).

. . ticket-monger n. Obs. one who trafficked in the pay-warrants of seamen, giving ready money with a large deduction, and then presenting them for payment.
1668 S. Pepys Diary 5 Mar. (1976) IX. 103 To answer only one question, touching our paying tickets to ticket-mongers.’

About Tuesday 1 April 1662

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘pretty, adv.
1. a. Qualifying an adjective or adverb: to a considerable extent; fairly, moderately; rather, quite. In later use also: very. N.E.D. (1908) has the following note: ‘Sometimes expressing close approximation to quite, or by meiosis equivalent to very; at other times denoting a much slighter degree’. In more recent use, generally indicating a moderately high degree . .
. . 1598 J. Florio Worlde of Wordes Boccace is prettie hard, yet understood: Petrarche harder but explaned.
a1627 T. Middleton & W. Rowley Old Law (1656) v. i. sig. I3, The Dutch Veny I swallowed pretty wel.
a1659 F. Rous Aspirations of Student in Academia Cœlestis (1702) 166 They are of a pretty Ancient Date.
1677 W. Hubbard Narr. Troubles with Indians New-Eng. 44 By the end of November the coast was pritty clear of them.
. . 1775 R. B. Sheridan St. Patrick's Day ii. ii, I'll take pretty good care of you.
. . 2004 Rocky Mt. News (Denver, Colorado) (Nexis) 1 Oct. 48 b, That dictionary definition sounds pretty good to me, too.’

So just how good SP thought the play was, we’ll never know.

About Monday 31 March 1662

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘fit n. . . 3. a. A paroxysm, or one of the recurrent attacks, of a periodic or constitutional ailment. In later use also with wider sense: A sudden and somewhat severe but transitory attack (of illness, or of some specified ailment).
. . a1616 Shakespeare Julius Caesar (1623) i. ii. 122 He had a Feauer..And when the Fit was on him, I did marke How he did shake.
1667 D. Allsopp in 12th Rep. Royal Comm. Hist. MSS (1890) App. v. 8 Taken with a fit of the collicke.
1691 Blair in W. S. Perry Hist. Coll. Amer. Colonial Church: Virginia (1870) I. 6 The Bishop of London..was..taken..with a fit of the stone.
. . 1771 T. Smollett Humphry Clinker I. 2, I expect to be laid up with another fit of the gout.
1806 J. Beresford Miseries Human Life I. iv. 76 A violent fit of coughing . . ‘