Annotations and comments

Chris Squire UK has posted 544 annotations/comments since 16 February 2013.

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About Monday 17 August 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ’ . . if I can seasonably . . ’

‘seasonably, adv < Old French . .
. . 1. In a fitting time; at the right moment; in due season.
. . 1671 T. Fairfax Short Mem. (1699) 55 When I was almost senseless, my Surgeon came seasonably, and bound up the wound, and stopt the bleeding.
1711 T. Hearne Remarks & Coll. (1889) III. 246 This Sermon was very seasonably deliver'd . . ‘
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Re:’ . . By which I perceive the wench is cunning . . ‘

‘cunning, adj. < Old English . .
. . 2. a. Possessing practical knowledge or skill; able, skilful, expert, dexterous, clever. (Formerly the prevailing sense; now only a literary archaism.)
. . 1616 Shakespeare Twelfth Night (1623) iii. iv. 276 And I thought he had beene valiant, and so cunning in Fence.
1690 J. Locke Two Treat. Govt. ii. xix, The tools of Cunninger workmen . .

. . 4. Possessing keen intelligence, wit, or insight; knowing, clever.
. . 1710 A. Philips Pastorals ii. 55 Against ill Luck all cunning Foresight fails . . ‘
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(OED)

About Saturday 15 August 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: “ . . he joyed me in my condition . . ”

‘joy, v. < Middle English . .
. . 5. b. To give or wish (a person) joy of something; to congratulate. Const. of (in). Obs.
. . 1660 S. Pepys Diary 22 Aug. (1970) I. 228 In the House..I met with Mr. G. Mountague and joyed him in his entrance [as M.P.] for Dover.
1701 N. Rowe Ambitious Step-mother iv. i. 1578, I come to joy you of a Crown . . ‘

(OED)

About Thursday 13 August 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘ . . to be as good as his word . . to a tittle . . ‘:

‘tittle, n. < Middle English titel . .
. . 2.b. to a tittle, with minute exactness, to the smallest particular, to a T.
1607   F. Beaumont Woman Hater iii. iii. sig. E3v,   Ile quote him to a tittle.
1700   S. Patrick Comm. Deut. xxviii. 53   This was fulfilled to a tittle by Vespasian and his son Titus . . ‘
(OED)
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About Tuesday 11 August 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘ . . I did soundly rattle him . . ‘

‘rattle, v.1 < Dutch . .
. . 4. trans. a. To scold or berate; to rail at. Now rare.
. . 1667 S. Pepys Diary 9 Aug. (1974) VIII. 378, I did soundly rattle him for neglecting her so much as he hath done . . ‘
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Re: ‘ . . they were very kind . . ‘

‘kind, adj. < Old English . .
. . 6. Of persons, their actions, etc.: Affectionate, loving, fond; on intimate terms. †a kind girl: a mistress. Also euphemistically. Now rare exc. dial.
. . 1594 H. Constable Diana (new ed.) viii. i. sig. F4, Women are kind by kind, but coy by fashion.
1698 J. Fryer New Acct. E.-India & Persia 110 The next Moon their Women flock to the Sacred Wells; where, they say, it is not difficult to persuade them to be kind.
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re: ‘ . . do what she list with him . . ’

‘list, v.1< Old English . .
. . 2. With personal construction.
b. Without dependent inf.: To wish, desire, like, choose . .
. . 1611 Bible (King James) John iii. 8 The winde bloweth where it listeth . . ‘
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(OED)

The post re 'ambage' above relates to tomorrow.

About Wednesday 12 August 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘ . . in the plainest way and without ambages . . ’

‘ambage, n. < 14th cent. French . .
. . 3. For delay: Circumlocutions, beating about the bush . .
. . 1678 A. Behn Sir Patient Fancy v. i. 73 Without more Ambages Sir, I have consider'd your former desires, and have consented to marry him . . ‘
(OED)

About Tuesday 11 August 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘ . . in the plainest way and without ambages . . ’

‘ambage, n. < 14th cent. French . .
. . 3. For delay: Circumlocutions, beating about the bush . .
. . 1678 A. Behn Sir Patient Fancy v. i. 73 Without more Ambages Sir, I have consider'd your former desires, and have consented to marry him . . ‘
(OED)

About Monday 10 August 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘ . .. some fine books of the Italian buildings, with fine cuts . . ’

cut, n.2 < Old Germanic . .
. . 22. a. A design cut or engraved upon wood, copper, or steel; the impression from this; an engraving, a plate . .
1646   Sir T. Browne Pseudodoxia Epidemica 258   Set forth in the Icons or Cuts of Martyrs by Cevallerius. 
1662   J. Evelyn Sculptura iii. 23   The Invention of Copper-cuts, and their Impressions.
1662   J. Evelyn Sculptura iv. 84   With some other cuts in wood known by his mark..All those excellent
. . 1695   London Gaz. No. 3131/3   The Cutts of the University..richly bound, and Printed in Folio at the Theatre . . ‘
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Re: ‘ . . the latter part [Greatorex] slubbered over . .

'slubber, v. < Dutch . .
. . 4. To run or skim over hurriedly and in a careless or slovenly manner . . In very common use in the 17th century.
1649   W. Blith Eng. Improver xiv. 80,   I dare say, one Acre of Corne thus throughly husbanded, may be worth two Acres, nay three, slubbered over.
1670   R. Baxter Duty Heavenly Medit. 23   Which may be lost by hasty breaking off, and slubbering over so great a business . . ‘
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(OED)

About Saturday 8 August 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Our Sam would have been particularly interested in discoveries and theories re the practical concerns of naval men: weather and how to forecast it, winds and why they blow and change, tides and the moon, etc.

OED has:

‘physics, n. < Latin physica < Greek τὰ ϕυσικά , lit. ‘natural things’ . .
1. a. Natural science in general; esp. the Aristotelian system of natural science. Also: a treatise on natural science. Now hist. The scope of the term has varied from including the whole of the physical world (Locke also included God, angels, etc.) to being restricted to inorganic bodies, until finally being further restricted to sense 1b.
. . 1656 tr. T. Hobbes Elements Philos. iv. xxv. 290, I have given to this Part, the title of Physiques or Phænomena of Nature.
. . 1704 J. Harris Lexicon Technicum I Physicks, or Natural Philosophy, is the Speculative Knowledge of all Natural Bodies (and Mr. Lock thinks, That God, Angels, Spirits &c. which usually are accounted as the Subject of Metaphysicks, should come into this Science), and of their proper Natures, Constitutions, Powers, and Operations . . ‘

About Thursday 6 August 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ' . . at a gossiping . . '
'gossiping, n. . . 
 1. A christening or christening-feast. Now dial.
a1627   T. Middleton Chast Mayd in Cheape-side (1630) ii. 18   You'le to the Gossiping of Mr Allwits Child?
1728   Brice's Weekly Jrnl. (Exeter) 30 Aug.   Last Sunday Afternoon was celebrated here a Gossipping, or held a jovial Meeting of Good Wives and Sweethearts, to solemnize the Baptism of a Child.
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Re: ' . . a very well-bred woman . . '
'well-bred, adj. . .
. . 2. b. Of speech, behaviour, character, etc.: demonstrating good breeding or upbringing; courteous, refined, decorous. Also in extended use.
1614   E. Grimeston in tr. P. Matthieu Hist. Lewis XI i. 20 (margin)    Natures wel bred are easily bound by fauors, they would haue corrupted Lewis.
1699   R. Bentley Diss. Epist. Phalaris (new ed.) 251   I'll give him leave to tell me again in his well-bred way, That my head has no Brains in't.
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Re: ' . . she to carve, drink, and show me great respect. . . '
'carve, v. < Common Germanic . .  
. . 9. fig. a. intr. To help or serve (oneself or others) at one's own discretion, to do at one's pleasure, indulge oneself.
. . 1604   Shakespeare Hamlet i. iii. 20   He may not as unvalued persons doe, Carve for himselfe. 
. . 1691   J. Locke Money in Wks. (1727) II. 35   When some common and great Distress..emboldens them to carve to their wants with armed Force.

. . 13. fig. (with reference to speech) Schmidt suggests ‘To show great courtesy and affability’.Obs.
1598   Shakespeare Love's Labour's Lost v. ii. 323   A can carue to, and lispe: Why this is hee That kist a way his hand, in courtisie.
1602   Shakespeare Merry Wives of Windsor i. iii. 40   She carues, she discourses. She giues the lyre of inuitation.

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(OED)

About Tuesday 4 August 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ' . . it being late I forbore Mrs. Lane . . '

‘forbear v. . . 4. a. . . do without, spare (a person or thing). Obs.
. .1667   Milton Paradise Lost ix. 747   Fruits..Whose taste, too long forborn, at first assay Gave elocution to the mute . . ‘