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Chris Squire UK has posted 272 annotations/comments since 16 February 2013.

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About Monday 17 March 1661/62

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘pink, n.2 < Middle Dutch pincke small sea-going ship, fishing-boat
a. A small sailing vessel, usually having a narrow stern; spec. (a) a flat-bottomed boat with bulging sides, used for coasting and fishing; (b) a small warship in which the stern broadens out at the level of the upper deck to accommodate quarter guns . .
. . 1574 J. Baret Aluearie P 349 A Pinke: a little shippe.
. . 1794 D. Steel Elements & Pract. Rigging & Seamanship I. 236 Pinks are mediterranean-vessels, and differ from the Xebec only in being more lofty, and not sharp in the bottom, as they are vessels of burthen. They have long narrow sterns, and three masts, carrying latteen-sails.
. . 1894 R. O. Heslop Northumberland Words Pink, an old-fashioned type of collier vessel, familiar on the Tyne until about the middle of the present century . . ‘

About Monday 17 March 1661/62

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘see . . 5. a. trans. To direct the sight (literal or metaphorical) intentionally to; to look at, contemplate, examine, inspect, or scrutinize; to visit (a place); to attend (a play, etc.) as a spectator . . Also to see and (to) be seen; hence see-and-be-seen attrib. phr.
. . 1828 Scott Jrnl. 3 May (1941) 236 After the dinner I went to Mrs. Scott of Harden, to see and be seen by her nieces.
. . a1911 W. S. Gilbert Lost Bab Ballads (1932) 31 To see and be seen is for what we pay At Islington on the half-crown day.
1960 Times 3 June 6/5 London audiences to which the social see-and-be-seen set attaches itself.
1961 Economist 25 Nov. 770/1 This mixing of ‘blind’ traffic with see-and-be-seen aircraft is particularly dangerous in overcrowded terminal areas.’

About Sunday 16 March 1661/62

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘mat, v.1
. . 2. trans. (usu. in pass.). a. To cover or protect with mats or matting; to provide with a mat. Also with up.
. . 1664 J. Evelyn Kalendarium Hortense 81 in Sylva Keep the Doors and Windows of your Conservatories well matted.
1672–3 in Trans. Devonshire Assoc. Adv. Sci. (1894) 26 345 Ffor stopping of the presentment at the Deane Ruralls Renewing ffor nott Matting the seates . . ‘

About Sunday 16 March 1661/62

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘decoy, n.2 < Decoy . . was preceded by a simple form coy < Dutch kooi of the same meaning . .; but the origin of the de- is undetermined.
1. A pond or pool out of which run narrow arms or ‘pipes’ covered with network or other contrivances into which wild ducks or other fowl may be allured and there caught.
. . a1684 J. Evelyn Diary anno 1665 (1955) III. 404 His Majestie was now finishing the Decoy in the Park . . ‘

About Thursday 20 March 1661/62

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

The odd thing, in retrospect, is that it took scholars so long to realise that the key to his code was hidden in plain sight, in his library.

OED has: ‘tachygraphy, n. < Greek ταχύς swift + -graphy
‘The art or practice of quick writing’ (Johnson); variously applied to shorthand, and (in palæography) to cursive as distinguished from angular letters, to the Egyptian hieratic, and to the Greek and Latin writing of the Middle Ages with its many abbreviations and compendia.
. . 1656 T. Blount Glossographia Tachygraphy, the art or description of swift writing.
1778 Biographia Britannica (ed. 2) I. 538 (note) , Thomas Shelton became famous..for his Tachygraphy; or easy, exact, and speedy short writing.’

About Friday 14 March 1661/62

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘torpedo, n. < Latin torpēdo stiffness, numbness . .
1. a. A flat fish of the genus Torpedo .. . characterized by the faculty of emitting electric discharges . .
. . 1646 Sir T. Browne Pseudodoxia Epidemica iii. vii. 119 Torpedoes deliver their opium at a distance, and stupifie beyond themselves . .

. . 2. a. orig. A case charged with gunpowder designed to explode under water after a given interval so as to destroy any vessel in its immediate vicinity; later also, a self-propelled submarine missile, usually cigar-shaped, carrying an explosive which is fired by impact with its objective.

The original torpedo was a towed or drifting submarine mine, used to defend channels, harbours, and the like ( drifting or moored torpedo ); it was towed at an angle by means of a spar extending at right angles ( otter or towing torpedo ), or carried on a ram or projecting pole ( boom-torpedo, out-rigger-torpedo, spar-torpedo).
1776 J. Thacher Mil. Jrnl. (1823) 75 Mr. Bushnell gave to his machine the name of American Turtle or Torpedo . . ‘

About Thursday 13 March 1661/62

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

The Church of England 100 years ago was called the Tory party at prayer but that’s not true nowadays: it has published a 52-page letter outlining its hopes for political parties to discern “a fresh moral vision of the kind of country we want to be” before the general election in May.

In it, leading English bishops address themes such as the church’s duty to join the political debate in an increasingly consumerist society, welfare reform and Britain’s role in the world.

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/feb/17/ch...

About Wednesday 12 March 1661/62

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

DNB writes:

‘As [Downing] later boasted to Pepys: he ‘ . . had so good spies, that he hath had the keys taken out of De Witts pocket when he was a-bed, and his closet opened and the papers brought to him and left in his hands for an [hour], and carried back and laid in the place again and the keys put in his pocket again . . ‘

His efforts culminated in 1662 in the triumph of scoutmastering from which his personal reputation would never recover: the apprehension and return for execution in England of the three regicides John Okey, Miles Corbet, and John Barkstead. It was not simply that the men had effectively been kidnapped on the territory of a foreign sovereign state. On the scaffold it fell to Okey to forgive his own ‘Chaplaine who pursued my life to the Death’. This achievement brought Downing a baronetcy and the personal attention of the king. Lucrative offices followed . .

It is against the same background, however, that Downing's extraordinary contribution to Restoration fiscal reconstruction and state building, the basis of his real historical importance, must be understood . . ‘

About Tuesday 11 March 1661/62

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘rummage, v. < Middle French arrumage . .
1. trans. Naut. a. To arrange or rearrange (cargo) in the hold of a ship.

. . 4. (a) To search thoroughly but unsystematically or untidily in (a place) or among (an accumulation of things) . .
. . 1622 J. Mabbe in tr. M. Alemán Rogue ii. vi. 55, I rummaged every corner about mee that I could suspect it [sc. the key] to be in, but all to no purpose . . ‘

About Sunday 2 March 1661/62

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘jog, v. Known only from 16th cent.; origin unascertained . .
. . 2. a. To give a slight push to, so as to shake; to nudge; esp. so as to arouse to attention.
. . a1653 Z. Boyd Zion's Flowers (1855) 12 Though I him jog and shake, its all in vaine.
. . 1889 J. K. Jerome Idle Thoughts 32 A bored-looking man, with a fashionably-dressed woman jogging his elbow . . ‘