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Chris Squire UK has posted 425 annotations/comments since 16 February 2013.

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About Wednesday 11 February 1662/63

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

‘ . . Assessment: Contemporaries of all persuasions acknowledged Sir Henry Vane's importance. Charles II believed him ‘too dangerous … to let live’; Algernon Sidney thought his death ‘intollerable grievous’ to England, whose ‘greatest ornament’ he was. Anthony Wood pronounced Vane ‘the Proteus of the times … an inventor … of whimseys in religion’ and ‘crotchets in the state’; George Sikes portrayed him as a ‘faithful watchman and able Patriot’, with ‘remarkable insight [into] the Politie of the true Commonwealth’ . .

Machiavellian or martyr? Historiography has since oscillated between these interpretations of his character . . Most politicians are not thinkers; most theorists are not actors. Vane was both. After over a decade of intense activity he began, in the 1650s, to publish his vision of the righteous republic . . Unswerving in his dedication to the cause of God and the principles befitting its adherents he remained a political pragmatist . . pursuing the reconciliation of all those formerly united under the banner of civil and Christian liberty.

This understudied ideological legacy survived the débâcle of 1659 to influence the subsequent development of republicanism on both sides of the Atlantic.’ [DNB]

About Monday 9 February 1662/63

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘Venice, n. < . . Latin Venetia . .
. . b. Venice treacle n. in old pharmacy, an electuary composed of many ingredients and supposed to possess universal alexipharmic and preservative properties.
1617 J. Woodall Surgions Mate 141 A little Venice Trekle or other Trekle.
1635 J. Taylor Life T. Parr C 3, And Garlick hee esteem'd above the rate Of Venice-Triacle, or best Mithridate.
1691 T. Hale Acct. New Inventions p. xxv, And as well may we be afraid to take the Venice Treacle, because of its being long kept in boxes of Lead . . ‘

‘electuary, n. < . . ἐκλείχειν to lick out
1. a. A medicinal conserve or paste, consisting of a powder or other ingredient mixed with honey, preserve, or syrup of some kind.
. . 1636 D. Featley Clavis Mystica xii. 148 Many simples goe to the making of a soveraigne Electuary . . ‘

‘alexipharmic, < post-classical Latin alexipharmicus . .
A medicine or treatment believed to protect against, counteract the effects of, or expel from the body a noxious or toxic substance, esp. a poison or venom; an antidote . . Alexipharmics were originally used in the treatment of many infectious diseases, including plague and smallpox.
1628 J. Woodall Viaticum 13 It [sc. Theriaca Diatessaron] resisteth putrifactious and pestilentiall vapours, and is the most antients Treacle of all other: my selfe haue had very much, true, and good experience of it, and would trust my life vpon it, before the 2. aforesaid Alexifarmicks.
1666 N. Hodges Vindiciæ Medicinæ & Medicorum (new ed.) 229 The chief intention in the cure consisting in an early expulsion of the malignity, proper Alexipharmicks did mostly contribute to this end . . ‘

About Thursday 5 February 1662/63

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Samuel is offering to give up 10 years' income now, when he is prospering and doesn't need it, for the certainty of a useful income for their old age, when he and then Elizabeth as his widow (7 years younger than him) may be poor. No doubt he was looking forward to his allotted 'three score years and ten' which turned out to be exactly what he got.

About Monday 2 February 1662/63

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has;

‘Ground-hog Day n. N. Amer.
1871 M. Schele de Vere Americanisms 369 Candlemas is known as Ground-hog Day, for on that day the ground-hog comes annually out of his hole, after a long winter nap, to look for his shadow. If he perceives it, he retires again to his burrow, which he does not leave for six weeks—weeks necessarily of stormy weather. But if he does not see his shadow, for lack of sunshine, he stays out of his hole till he can, and the weather is sure to become mild and pleasant . . ‘

About Monday 2 February 1662/63

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘collar-day, n. A day on which Knights wear the collar of their Order, when taking part in any court ceremony.
. . 1662 S. Pepys Diary 29 Sept. (1970) III. 207 It being Collar day—we had no time to talk with him about any business.
1663 S. Pepys Diary 2 Feb. (1971) IV. 31 It being Coller-day, it being Candlemas-day.
. . 1764 Low Life 56 This being Whitsunday and consequently Collar Day at Court . . ‘
………………..

‘If Candlemas Day be fair and bright
Winter will have another fight
If Candlemas Day brings cloud and rain
Winter won't come again.

If Candlemas Day be dry and fair
The half o the winter's to come and mair
If Candlemas Day be wet and foul
The half o the winter's gone at yule.’

Better known to godless colonials as Groundhog Day!

About Monday 26 January 1662/63

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘pasquil . . 2. = pasquinade . .
. . 1612 T. James Iesuits Downefall 38 They blame others for Libells and verie vnpriestly Pasquils, and yet write themselues.
1698 Protestant Mercury 18–23 Feb. 1/1 A certain Pasquil, which was sometime since affixed up at the Town-House, against the Government.
1709 R. Steele Tatler No. 92. ⁋1 All the Pasquils, Lampoons and Libels, we meet with now-a-days.
1767 T. Percy Reliques (ed. 2) II. ii. 118 Many a pasquil was discharged at the Romish priests, and their enormous encroachments on property . . ‘

‘pasquinade, n. < French pasquinade (Originally) a lampoon posted in a public place; (later) any circulated or published lampoon or libel.
1658 E. Phillips New World Eng. Words Pasquinade, a Satyrical Invective or Libel, savoring of the Pasquin at Rome.
1705 D. Defoe Writings Author True-Born Englishman II. 70 Some in Pasquinades affront the State . . ‘

About Sunday 25 January 1662/63

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘wind n. < Old English wind . . < *ἄϝησι) blows, ἀήτης wind, Sanskrit vāti blows, vāta wind.
. . 19. down (the) wind.
. . b. fig. Towards decay or ruin; into or (commonly) in a depressed or unfortunate condition, in evil plight; to go down the wind, to ‘go down’, decline. Obs.
1600 P. Holland tr. Livy Rom. Hist. xxxiv. 867 When they saw him downe the wind and fortune to frowne upon him.
1671 tr. Machiavelli Marriage of Belphegor in tr. F. G. de Quevedo y Villegas Novels 141 Though [he] was of one of the noblest Families.., yet he was look'd upon as down the winde [It. poverissimo].
1673 W. Cave Primitive Christianity ii. vi. 147 In the time of Constantine when Paganism began to go down the wind . . ‘

and

‘challenge, v. < Middle English chalange, < Old French . .
5. To assert one's title to, lay claim to, demand as a right . .
a. with simple object. arch.
. . 1634 T. Herbert Relation Some Yeares Trauaile 1, I challenge no thankes for what I publish.
. . 1699 R. Bentley Diss. Epist. Phalaris (new ed.) 329 A Gentleman that challenges the Title of Honourable . . ‘

So it is Montague, whose claim is denied and whose status is declining, who goes down the wind.