Annotations and comments

Chris Squire UK has posted 208 annotations/comments since 16 February 2013.

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About Friday 18 October 1661

Chris Squire UK   Link to this

OED has:

‘tumour . . 3. a. An abnormal or morbid swelling or enlargement in any part of the body of an animal or plant; an excrescence; a tumefaction. Now usually in restricted sense: see 3b.
. . 1601 J. Marston et al. Iacke Drums Entertainm. ii. sig. C3, The Gout causeth a great tumor in a mans legges.
. . 1758 B. Gooch Cases Surg. 17 A Species of tumor called by the common people the Mumps . . ‘

b. spec. A permanent circumscribed morbid swelling, consisting in a new growth of tissue, without inflammation.
1804 J. Abernethy Surg. Observ. 6, I shall restrict the surgical signification of the word ‘Tumour’ to such swellings as arise from some new production . . ‘

About Thursday 17 October 1661

Chris Squire UK   Link to this

DNB has:

‘ . . Despite Catherine's appeasement of the king she did not gain much influence at court, mainly due to her failure (in marked contrast to Charles's mistresses) to have children. She apparently suffered from dysfunctional uterine bleeding; a visitor to the court in 1668 heard that ‘the extraordinary frequency and abundance of her menses’ made it unlikely that she would have children . .

Catherine had not been unwilling to fulfil her role as the British queen consort but circumstances conspired to make her success unlikely. Her ‘ordinary mind’ and lack of beauty and sophistication disappointed her court, and while she came to love her husband, who for his part welcomed her non-interference in politics and praised her goodness, his mistresses were the bane of her life, and her childlessness the cause of great misery . . ‘

About Wednesday 16 October 1661

Chris Squire UK   Link to this

OED has:

‘ling, n.1
1. A long slender gadoid fish, Molva vulgaris or Lota molva, inhabiting the seas of northern Europe. It is largely used for food (usually either salted, or split and dried) . .
▸c1300 Havelok (Laud) (1868) 832 Ne he ne mouthe on the se take Neyther lenge, ne thornbake.
. . 1667 S. Pepys Diary 20 Mar. (1974) VIII. 121 Had a good dinner of Ling and herring pie . . ‘

‘sound, n.6 . . Of obscure origin; perhaps an error for squid.
1611 R. Cotgrave Dict. French & Eng. Tongues, Seche, the sound, or Cuttle-fish.’

About Tuesday 15 October 1661

Chris Squire UK   Link to this

OED has:

'blind adj. . . 8. a. Out of sight, out of the way, secret, obscure, privy. Cf. blind alley n.
. . 1661   S. Pepys Diary 15 Oct. (1970) II. 195   To Paul's churchyard to a blind place, where Mrs. Goldsborough was to meet me . . '

About Sunday 13 October 1661

Chris Squire UK   Link to this

OED has:

‘tabby, n. and adj. < French tabi . . apparently < Arabic ʿattābiy, name of a quarter of Bagdad in which this stuff was manufactured, named after ʿAttāb, great-grandson of Omeyya . .
A. . 1. n. a. A general term for a silk taffeta, app. originally striped, but afterwards applied also to silks of uniform colour waved or watered.
. . 1662 J. Davies tr. A. Olearius Voy. & Trav. Ambassadors 23 One piece of silver'd Taby, with flowers of Gold . .

B. adj.
1. Made or consisting of tabby (see A. 1).
. . 1661 S. Pepys Diary 13 Oct. (1970) II. 195 This day..put on..my false taby waistcoat with gold lace . . ‘

About Friday 11 October 1661

Chris Squire UK   Link to this

OED has:

‘cataplasm, n. . . < Greek κατάπλασμα poultice, . . med.
a. A poultice: formerly also a plaster.
. . 1626 H. Cockeram Eng. Dict. (ed. 2) , Cataplasme, a plaister, compounded of certaine oyntments to cure sores . . ‘

‘cod, n.1 . . Old English cod . .
. . 4. a. The integument enveloping the testicles, the scrotum; improperly in pl. testicles. (Not in polite use.)
1398 J. Trevisa tr. Bartholomew de Glanville De Proprietatibus Rerum (1495) vii. lv. 269 The codde of the genetours.
. . 1615 H. Crooke Μικροκοσμογραϕια 250 The cod is a rugous and thin skin.
1632 R. Sherwood Dict. in R. Cotgrave Dict. French & Eng. Tongues (new ed.) , The cod or cods of a man or beast, couillon, testicule . . ‘

About Tuesday 8 October 1661

Chris Squire UK   Link to this

This must be the sense of ‘frolic’ intended here:

‘ . .1c. = whim n.1
1711 Swift Jrnl. to Stella 5 Apr. (1948) I. 235 If the frolick should take you of going to the Bath, I here send you a note on Parvisol.’

‘whim . . 3.b. In generalized sense: Capricious humour or disposition of mind.
a1721 M. Prior Enigma: Form'd half Beneath 7 They [sc. skates] serve the poor for use, the rich for whim.
1729 Pope Dunciad (new ed.) iii. 147 Sneering G**de, half malice and half whim.
1809 B. H. Malkin tr. A. R. Le Sage Adventures Gil Blas IV. xii. i. 376, I came up to pay my devotions; but whim, or perhaps revenge .. determined her to put on the stranger . . ‘ [OED]

About Monday 7 October 1661

Chris Squire UK   Link to this

Agreed. This page also includes an explanation of copyhold for anyone wondering what this form of tenure = property right was. It was abolished in 1922.

About Sunday 6 October 1661

Chris Squire UK   Link to this

OED has:

‘snuff, n.2 < snuff v.2 . .
1. a. An (or the) act of snuffing, esp. as an expression of contempt or disdain.
1570 J. Dee in H. Billingsley tr. Euclid Elements Geom. Pref. sig. *iiijv, Other (perchaunce) with a proude snuffe will disdaine this litle.
. . 1629 J. Gaule Distractions 198 Nought but a glance, a puffe, a snuffe, a frown.
1809 B. H. Malkin tr. A. R. Le Sage Adventures Gil Blas II. iv. viii. 181 That hound-like snuff at an ill construction, with which the devil has armed the noses of the most charitable.’

‘snuff, v.2
. . 7. To express scorn, disdain, or contempt by snuffing; to sniff. Freq. const. at a thing or person. Now rare or Obs.
. . 1643 Lismore Papers (1888) 2nd Ser. V. 139 Being snuffed at by some great ones, none of the rest wold signe . .
1674 J. Bunyan Christian Behaviour in Wks. (1852) II. 568 It argueth pride when..thou snuffest and givest way to thy spirit to be peevish . . ‘

About Friday 4 October 1661

Chris Squire UK   Link to this

OED has:

'Suffolk cheese n.
. . 1661 S. Pepys Diary 4 Oct. (1970) II. 191, I find my wife vexed at her people for grumbling to eate Suffolk cheese.
1797 A. Young Gen. View Agric. Suffolk 203 Cheese 5d., but Suffolk 3½d. and 4d.'