Annotations and comments

Chris Squire UK has posted 638 annotations/comments since 16 February 2013.

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About Monday 11 January 1663/64

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘ . . when the loggerhead knows nothing almost that is sense.’

‘loggerhead, n. < logger n.2* . .
1. a. A thick-headed or stupid person; a blockhead.
. . 1611 R. Cotgrave Dict. French & Eng. Tongues Teste de boeuf, a ioulthead,..logerhead; one whose wit is as little as his head is great .. .

. . 3. a. An iron instrument with a long handle and a ball or bulb at the end used, when heated in the fire, for melting pitch and for heating liquids.
1687 in J. Strype Stow's Survey of London (1720) II. v. xviii. 288/2 Not to suffer Pitch, Tar, Rozin, &c. to be heated on board by Fire, Loggerhead Shot, or any other thing . .

* dial. a. A heavy block of wood fastened to the leg of a horse to prevent it straying (1777 in Eng. Dial. Dict.).’

(OED)

About Sunday 10 January 1663/64

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ’ . . a mad, swearing, confident fellow, . . ’

‘confident, adj. and n. < Latin . .
. . 4. In bad sense: Over-bold, unduly self-reliant; forward, presumptuous, impudent. Obs.
. . 1664 S. Pepys Diary 6 July (1971) IV. 197 Mrs. Clerkes kinswoman sings very prettily, but is very confident in it.
1688 T. Shadwell Squire of Alsatia iii. i. 48 Oh she's a Confident thing! . . ‘

About Friday 8 January 1663/64

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘ . . his man is guilty of confederacy . .’

‘confederacy, n. < Anglo-Norman . .
. . 2. a. Condition or fact of being confederate: union for joint action, alliance. In a bad sense: . . collusion.
. .1641 Rastell's Termes de la Ley (new ed.) f. 73, Two were indicted of Confederacie.
1677 C. Hatton Corr. Family of Hatton (1878) I. 146 They were guilty of confederacy . . ‘
(OED)

About Wednesday 6 January 1663/64

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘It was a leather strop indeed,’

‘strop, n.1 < Old English? < Greek στρόϕος . .
. . 3. A strip of leather (or of a special textile), or a strip of wood covered with leather or other suitable material, used for sharpening a razor . .
1702 Post Man 3–5 Feb. 2/1 Strops for setting Razors, Pen-knives, &c. upon . . ‘ (OED)

About Tuesday 5 January 1663/64

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘ .. . I shall over clogg myself with it . . ’

‘clog, v. < clog n. Known since 14th cent.; derivation obscure.
. . 3. a. fig. To load, burden, encumber, hamper.
. . 1618 E. Elton Complaint Sanctified Sinner vi. 115 Clogged with the yoke and burden of their sinnes . .
b. fig. To hinder, impede, obstruct (actions).
1679 R. South Serm. Several Occasions 56 The Devotion of men is apt to be clogged by such Ceremonies . . ‘
(OED)

About Thursday 31 December 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ' . . besides all my household stuff . . '

‘ . .< Old French estoffe . .
I. 1. . . g. Property, esp. movable property, household goods or utensils; furniture . . Obs. exc. in household stuff n. arch.
. . 1656 A. Cowley Davideis iii. 89 in Poems Some lead the groaning waggons, loaded high, With stuff, on top of which the Maidens ly.’

About Tuesday 29 December 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: "their discourse so free about clap and other foul discourse that I was weary of them."

‘clap, n.2 < Of uncertain origin. Compare Old French ‘clapoir . .
Obs. in polite use.
a. Gonorrhœa.
. . 1605 A. Montgomerie Flyting with Polwart 312 The clape and the canker.
1854 R. G. Mayne Expos. Lexicon Med. Sci. (1860) 204/1 Clap, vulgar name for the disease Baptorrhœa . .

b. With a, and pl.
. . 1663 S. Butler Hudibras: First Pt. i. i. 6 And truly so [circumcis'd] he was perhaps, Not as a Proselyte, but for Claps . . ‘
(OED)

About Sunday 27 December 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re copyright, wikipedia, etc.:

‘Wikipedia's textual content is copyright, but you may reuse it under the terms of our licensing requirements:

Most text in Wikipedia, excluding quotations, has been released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Sharealike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA) . . and can therefore be reused (provided) you release any derived work under (on the same terms). This requires that, among other things, you attribute the authors and allow others to freely copy your work . . '

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:FAQ/Cop...

About Capt. Robert Holmes

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

' . . Holmes's command of the Jersey was also notable for its trial of two sea-going pendulum clocks, . . in search of a solution to the ‘longitude problem’. On his return, Holmes considerably overplayed the usefulness and accuracy of the clocks, though the voyage does represent the first sea trial of devices successfully developed in the following century . .

Holmes's (reputation) suffered . . , primarily because of his clashes with Pepys and his reputation as the begetter of two wars . . (He was) Undoubtedly brave and passionately loyal to his monarchs, despite propensities for quarrelling, exceeding orders, and self-aggrandizement . . ‘
(DNB)

About Sunday 27 December 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

‘ . . Holmes received . . instructions for another voyage to Guinea . . Ostensibly intended to protect the African Company's trade, the real purpose of the expedition was to disrupt that of the Dutch and to seize Dutch possessions on the Guinea coast. . .

On 21 January Holmes attacked Goree . . Sailing on to Sierra Leone and Cape Palmas, he took the 30-gun . . Walcheren on 28 March . . taking the Dutch fort of Anta . .

He . . took (several) Dutch positions along the Gold Coast before sailing for England on 16 June. The Jersey . . the Downs on the 27 December.

By the time of his return, a . . Dutch fleet under De Ruyter had retaken virtually all of his conquests, and, in turn, a large English fleet under Rupert was fitting out to oppose it. The African Company was baying for compensation . . and he was committed to the Tower . . his . . pardon came on 23 March (because) largely to his activities in Africa, England had gone to war with the Netherlands on 22 February.

Holmes's command of the Jersey was also notable for its trial of two sea-going pendulum clocks, . . in search of a solution to the ‘longitude problem’. On his return, Holmes considerably overplayed the usefulness and accuracy of the clocks, though the voyage does represent the first sea trial of devices successfully developed in the following century . .

Holmes's (reputation) suffered . . , primarily because of his clashes with Pepys and his reputation as the begetter of two wars . . (He was) Undoubtedly brave and passionately loyal to his monarchs, despite propensities for quarrelling, exceeding orders, and self-aggrandizement . . ‘
(DNB)