Annotations and comments

Chris Squire UK has posted 470 annotations/comments since 16 February 2013.

The most recent…


Comments

About Wednesday 22 April 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘tune < Latin tonus n. . . 5. fig. Frame of mind, temper, mood, disposition, humour . .
1600 Shakespeare Much Ado about Nothing iii. iv. 38 Hero How now? do you speake in the sicke tune? Beat. I am out of all other tune, me thinkes.
1608 Shakespeare King Lear xvii. 40 [Lear] some time in his better tune remembers, What we are come about.
. . a1691 J. Flavell Faithful Narr. Sea-deliv. in Wks. (1701) II. 72 Our Fancies were out of Tune to be pleasant with any thing.’

About Monday 20 April 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: How was Buccleuch pronounced? etc . . : Buccleuch is a pair of wee hamlets tucked away in a fold of the Scottish Borders which get their name from Buck Cleuch (Scots; pron: Brit. /kluːx/, /kluː/, U.S. /kluk/ , /klux/ , /klu/ , Scottish /kl(j)uːx/). a steep sided small valley carved into a hillside: http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/277702.

Monmouth’s new wife was Anne Scott, 4th Countess of Buccleuch. She was created Duchess of Buccleuch in her own right along with her husband, so that the title was unaffected by Monmouth's attainder of 1685. The wikipedia page https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duke_of_Buccleuch explains all and displays several coats-of-arms with the royal arms with bar sinister in the first quarter.

The current Duke of Buccleuch, Richard Scott, the 10th Duke, is the largest private landowner in the United Kingdom.

About Saturday 18 April 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘hereupon, adv.
1. Upon this thing, point, subject, or matter.
. . 1651 T. Hobbes Leviathan iii. xxxvi. 226 Hereupon a question may be asked.

2. Immediately following upon this (in time or consequence).
. . 1706 tr. L. E. Du Pin New Eccl. Hist. 16th Cent. II. iii. xviii. 261 Hereupon there was a great murmur . . ‘

Sense 2 here, I think.

About Friday 17 April 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘sugar-sop, n. < Old English sopp . .
†1. pl. A dish composed of steeped slices of bread, sweetened and sometimes spiced . .
. . 1663 S. Pepys Diary 17 Apr. (1971) IV. 104 Our dinner, it being Goodfriday, was only sugar sopps and fish . . ‘

About Thursday 16 April 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

ˈtruckle-bed, n. < Anglo-Norman trocle < Latin trochlea = Greek τροχιλία sheaf of a pulley . .
A low bed running on truckles or castors, usually pushed beneath a high or ‘standing’ bed when not in use; a trundle-bed.
. . 1662 S. Pepys Diary 1 May (1970) III. 75 To bed all alone, and my Will in the truckle-bed.’

About Thursday 16 April 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Time for some Browning for SDS:

‘OH, to be in England now that April ’s there
And whoever wakes in England sees, some morning, unaware,
That the lowest boughs and the brushwood sheaf
Round the elm-tree bole are in tiny leaf,
While the chaffinch sings on the orchard bough
In England—now! . . ‘

http://www.bartleby.com/246/647.html

It's happening around me now . .

About Wednesday 15 April 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘Norway, n.< Norway, the name of a country in Scandinavia....
1. attrib. Designating plants, animals, etc., native to or originating from Norway, and things made in or associated with Norway.
. . 1711 E. Ward Life Don Quixote I. 39 As tough As Norway Seal-skin, and as rough.
1759 Newport (Rhode Island) Mercury 26 June 4/3 To be sold by Jacob Richardson... Brass kettles and skillets... Rub and Norway Rag Stones.
. . 1858 P. L. Simmonds Dict. Trade Products Norway Ragstone, the coarsest variety of the hone-slates, or whetstones . .

†5. slang. Norway neckcloth n. a pillory. Obs.
1785 F. Grose Classical Dict. Vulgar Tongue Norway neckloth[sic], the pillory, usually made of Norway fir.’

‘pitch, v.2 < Of uncertain origin.
. . 22. intr. With on or upon. To settle or decide on; to select, choose . .
1628 W. Prynne Briefe Suruay Mr. Cozens 62, I shall onely pitch vpon these ensuing passages.
1674 W. Allen Danger of Enthusiasm 86 The way and method which God pitcht upon . . ‘

About Tuesday 14 April 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘pettish, adj.< Apparently formed within English < pet n.3
Of a person or his or her behaviour: subject to fits of offended ill humour; childishly bad-tempered and petulant; peevish, sulky
. . a1641 R. Montagu Acts & Monuments (1642) iv. 272 He became pettish, wayward, frantick, bloudy.
1666 S. Pepys Diary 6 Aug. (1972) VII. 236, I checked her, which made her mighty pettish . . ‘

About Tuesday 14 April 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

In a world made up of rank and deference to it, the Sirs regarded attendance on the Royals as part of their duties:

’attendance, n. < Old French
. . 3. The action or condition of waiting upon, accompanying, or escorting a person, to do him service; ministration, assiduous service. in attendance: waiting upon, attending.
. . 4. The action or condition of an inferior in waiting the leisure, convenience, or decision of a superior.’

but some onlookers would say:

‘ . . 5. In senses 3, 4 the phrases to wait attendance (obs.), to dance attendance, occur= ‘to attend’; the latter usually with some shade of sarcasm or contempt.
. . 1628 R. Burton Anat. Melancholy (ed. 3) iii. ii. ii. iv. 451 Shut him out of doores once or twice, let him dance attendance . . ‘

They may well have made it clear to our man that his attendance was not required as he was too junior; he may have been miffed at this or glad not to have to waste the time hanging about to no good purpose.