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Chris Squire UK has posted 345 annotations/comments since 16 February 2013.

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About Friday 22 August 1662

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘I had liked to have begged a parrot for my wife’ - I read this as no more than a simple change of tense to how we would say it now: ‘I would have liked to have begged a parrot for my wife’. ‘Liked’ here = ‘lief/leave’ adv. dearly, gladly, willingly [OED] now obs.

About Monday 18 August 1662

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

“half-square n. Obs. (see quots.).
1662 S. Pepys Diary 18 Aug. (1970) III. 169 The whole mystery of off [half]-square, wherein the King is abused in the timber that he buys.
1674 W. Leybourn Compl. Surveyor (ed. 3) 345 Most Artificers when they meet with Squared Timber, whose breadth and depth are unequal..usually add the breadth and depth together, and take the half for a Mean Square, and so proceed..If the difference be great, the Error is very obnoxious either to Buyer or Seller.”

About Friday 15 August 1662

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘expropriate, v. < late Latin expropriāt- . .
1. trans. To dispossess (a person) of ownership; to deprive of property . .
1611 R. Cotgrave Dict. French & Eng. Tongues Exproprié, expropriated . . ‘

About Monday 11 August 1662

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED agrees with Bill and has:

‘cheap, n.1 < A common Germanic noun: Old English céap ‘barter, buying and selling, market, price, merchandise, stock, cattle’ . . Old English is the only language in which the noun has the sense ‘cattle’, so that there is no ground for taking that as the original sense; it was either, like the word cattle n. itself, a special application of the general sense ‘merchandise, stock’, or perhaps connected with the use of cattle as a medium of exchange . .
Obs.
I. As a simple n.
1. A bargain about the bartering or exchanging of one commodity for another, or of giving money or the like for any commodity; bargaining, trade, buying and selling. . .
2. a. The place of buying and selling; market. . .
b. in place-names, as Cheapside, Eastcheap.) . . ‘

About Sunday 10 August 1662

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘neat < Anglo-Norman neet . .
. . 3. b. Of language or speech: well chosen or expressed; brief, clear, and to the point; pithy, epigrammatic.
. . 1687 J. Evelyn Diary (1955) IV. 539 A very quaint neate discourse of moral Righteousnesse.

. . c. Of actions, etc.: involving special skill, accuracy, or precision; cleverly contrived or executed.
. . 1663 S. Pepys Diary 11 Aug. (1971) IV. 272 We went in and there shewed Mrs. Turner his perspective and volary..which is a most neat thing . .

. . d. Of preparations, esp. in cookery: skilfully or tastefully prepared; choice; elegant. Obs.
. . 1669 S. Pepys Diary 24 Feb. (1976) IX. 458 Had a mighty neat dish of custards and tarts . . ‘

About Wednesday 6 August 1662

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has

‘wind n. . . 19. down (the) wind .
. . b. fig. Towards decay or ruin; into or (commonly) in a depressed or unfortunate condition, in evil plight; to go down the wind , to ‘go down’, decline. Obs.
1600 P. Holland tr. Livy Rom. Hist. xxxiv. 867 When they saw him downe the wind and fortune to frowne upon him.
. . 1673 W. Cave Primitive Christianity ii. vi. 147 In the time of Constantine when Paganism began to go down the wind.
.. . 1827 Scott Jrnl. 25 Apr. (1941) 45 The old Tory party is down the wind.’

About Monday 4 August 1662

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘droll, v. < obsolete French drôler ‘to play the wag’, etc. . .
1. intr. To make sport or fun; to jest, joke; to play the buffoon. Const. with, at, on, upon.
. . 1665 Earl of Marlborough Fair Warnings 19 There was no greater argument of a foolish and inconsiderate person, than profanely to droll at Religion.
. . 1680 Vindic. Conforming Clergy (ed. 2) 32 An Author..that drolls with every thing.

. . drolling n. . .
1670 G. Havers tr. G. Leti Il Cardinalismo di Santa Chiesa i. i. 19 [They] use but drolling and impertinence in their Arguments . . ‘

About Thursday 7 August 1662

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘interest n. < French interest . . 6. Influence due to personal connection; power of influencing the action of others . .
. . 1653 Act Govt. Commw. 45 Several persons of Interest and Fidelity in this Commonwealth.
1676 tr. G. Guillet de Saint-Georges Acct. Voy. Athens 365 Her interest with him is such, that she governs him absolutely.
. . 1761 D. Hume Hist. Eng. II. xxxvi. 293 To raise the people in the counties..where his interest lay.’