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Chris Squire UK has posted 422 annotations/comments since 16 February 2013.

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About Thursday 5 February 1662/63

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Samuel is offering to give up 10 years' income now, when he is prospering and doesn't need it, for the certainty of a useful income for their old age, when he and then Elizabeth as his widow (7 years younger than him) may be poor. No doubt he was looking forward to his allotted 'three score years and ten' which turned out to be exactly what he got.

About Monday 2 February 1662/63

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has;

‘Ground-hog Day n. N. Amer.
1871 M. Schele de Vere Americanisms 369 Candlemas is known as Ground-hog Day, for on that day the ground-hog comes annually out of his hole, after a long winter nap, to look for his shadow. If he perceives it, he retires again to his burrow, which he does not leave for six weeks—weeks necessarily of stormy weather. But if he does not see his shadow, for lack of sunshine, he stays out of his hole till he can, and the weather is sure to become mild and pleasant . . ‘

About Monday 2 February 1662/63

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘collar-day, n. A day on which Knights wear the collar of their Order, when taking part in any court ceremony.
. . 1662 S. Pepys Diary 29 Sept. (1970) III. 207 It being Collar day—we had no time to talk with him about any business.
1663 S. Pepys Diary 2 Feb. (1971) IV. 31 It being Coller-day, it being Candlemas-day.
. . 1764 Low Life 56 This being Whitsunday and consequently Collar Day at Court . . ‘
………………..

‘If Candlemas Day be fair and bright
Winter will have another fight
If Candlemas Day brings cloud and rain
Winter won't come again.

If Candlemas Day be dry and fair
The half o the winter's to come and mair
If Candlemas Day be wet and foul
The half o the winter's gone at yule.’

Better known to godless colonials as Groundhog Day!

About Monday 26 January 1662/63

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘pasquil . . 2. = pasquinade . .
. . 1612 T. James Iesuits Downefall 38 They blame others for Libells and verie vnpriestly Pasquils, and yet write themselues.
1698 Protestant Mercury 18–23 Feb. 1/1 A certain Pasquil, which was sometime since affixed up at the Town-House, against the Government.
1709 R. Steele Tatler No. 92. ⁋1 All the Pasquils, Lampoons and Libels, we meet with now-a-days.
1767 T. Percy Reliques (ed. 2) II. ii. 118 Many a pasquil was discharged at the Romish priests, and their enormous encroachments on property . . ‘

‘pasquinade, n. < French pasquinade (Originally) a lampoon posted in a public place; (later) any circulated or published lampoon or libel.
1658 E. Phillips New World Eng. Words Pasquinade, a Satyrical Invective or Libel, savoring of the Pasquin at Rome.
1705 D. Defoe Writings Author True-Born Englishman II. 70 Some in Pasquinades affront the State . . ‘

About Sunday 25 January 1662/63

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘wind n. < Old English wind . . < *ἄϝησι) blows, ἀήτης wind, Sanskrit vāti blows, vāta wind.
. . 19. down (the) wind.
. . b. fig. Towards decay or ruin; into or (commonly) in a depressed or unfortunate condition, in evil plight; to go down the wind, to ‘go down’, decline. Obs.
1600 P. Holland tr. Livy Rom. Hist. xxxiv. 867 When they saw him downe the wind and fortune to frowne upon him.
1671 tr. Machiavelli Marriage of Belphegor in tr. F. G. de Quevedo y Villegas Novels 141 Though [he] was of one of the noblest Families.., yet he was look'd upon as down the winde [It. poverissimo].
1673 W. Cave Primitive Christianity ii. vi. 147 In the time of Constantine when Paganism began to go down the wind . . ‘

and

‘challenge, v. < Middle English chalange, < Old French . .
5. To assert one's title to, lay claim to, demand as a right . .
a. with simple object. arch.
. . 1634 T. Herbert Relation Some Yeares Trauaile 1, I challenge no thankes for what I publish.
. . 1699 R. Bentley Diss. Epist. Phalaris (new ed.) 329 A Gentleman that challenges the Title of Honourable . . ‘

So it is Montague, whose claim is denied and whose status is declining, who goes down the wind.

About Friday 23 January 1662/63

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘send, v.1 < Old English sęndan . . Phrasal verbs
. . 9. send for —— v.
b. With adv. qualifying ‘to come’ or ‘be brought’ understood.
. . 1727 Swift Horace Imitated in Swift Misc. Last Vol. ii. 34 Send for him up, take no Excuse.
1753 J. Collier Art Tormenting i. ii. 62, I shall not send for you back . .

c. Of a sovereign: To command the attendance of . .
1744 T. Birch Life R. Boyle 154 He was then by his Majesty's order sent for to Whitehall . . ‘

‘Up’ = ‘up to London’.

About Bread

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Some = ship's biscuit:

‘bread, n. < Old English bréad . .
. . 6. Extended to various preparations of the composition or nature of bread.
. . †b. Sea-biscuit. Obs.
1651 Severall Proc. Parl. No. 84. 1289 We have taken..2 casks of Bread, and one barrel of Pease in one Vessel.
1746 in W. Thompson Royal Navy-men's Advocate (1757) 18 The Bread..is all good, but..it has been..long aboard . . ’

[OED]

About Thursday 22 January 1662/63

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘bear, v.1 < Common Germanic, and Aryan:
. . Phrasal verbs
to bear out . . to support, back up, corroborate, confirm . .
. . 1801 M. Edgeworth Forester in Moral Tales I. 204 You think, I suppose, that your friends..will bear you out . . ‘

‘bread, n. < Old English bréad . .
. . 6. Extended to various preparations of the composition or nature of bread.
. . †b. Sea-biscuit. Obs.
1651 Severall Proc. Parl. No. 84. 1289 We have taken..2 casks of Bread, and one barrel of Pease in one Vessel.
1746 in W. Thompson Royal Navy-men's Advocate (1757) 18 The Bread..is all good, but..it has been..long aboard . . ’

‘cul-de-sac, n < French = sack-bottom.
1. Anat. A vessel, tube, sac, etc. open only at one end, as the cæcum or ‘blind gut’; the closed extremity of such a vessel, etc.
1738 Med. Ess. & Observ. (ed. 2) IV. 92 An Infundibuliform Cul de Sac or Thimble-like cavity . .
2. A street, lane, or passage closed at one end, a blind alley . .
1800 A. Paget Let. 10 May in Paget Papers (1896) I. 201 This [i.e. Palermo] is such a cul de sac that it would (be) ridiculous to attempt sending you any news . . ’