Annotations and comments

Chris Squire UK has posted 195 annotations/comments since 16 February 2013.

The most recent…

About Monday 16 September 1661

Chris Squire UK   Link to this

OED has:

‘chaldron, n. Etym: Another form of cauldron n.; < Old French chauderon,
. . 2. A dry measure of 4 quarters or 32 bushels; in recent times only used for coals (36 bushels).
. . 1664 S. Pepys Diary 27 July (1971) IV. 223 This afternoon came my great store of Coles in, being ten Chaldron.
. . 1798 C. Hutton Course Math. I. 28, 36 bushels, heaped up, make a London chaldron of coals, the weight of which is 3156lb Avoirdupois.
. . 1851 G. C. Greenwell Gloss. Terms Coal Trade Northumberland & Durham (ed. 2) 13 The Newcastle chaldron is a measure containing 53 cwt. of coals..It has been found, by repeated trials, that 15 London Pool chaldrons are equal to 8 Newcastle chaldrons.’

About Thursday 12 September 1661

Chris Squire UK   Link to this

OED has:

‘blind . . III. Transferred.
6. a. Enveloped in darkness; dark, obscure. arch.
. . 1666 S. Pepys Diary 26 Sept. (1972) VII. 296 The little blind bed-chamber.

. . 8. a. Out of sight, out of the way, secret, obscure, privy. Cf. blind alley n.
. . 1661 S. Pepys Diary 15 Oct. (1970) II. 195 To Paul's churchyard to a blind place, where Mrs. Goldsborough was to meet me.’

SP's meaning here is clear enough.

About Monday 9 September 1661

Chris Squire UK   Link to this

OED has:

'troth
. . 1.b. by (rarely upon) my troth , as a form of asseveration.
. . 1600   Shakespeare Much Ado about Nothing ii. iii. 99   By my troth my Lord, I cannot tell what to thinke of it.
1704   Swift Full Acct. Battel between Bks. in Tale of Tub 245   By my Troth, said the Bee, the Comparison will amount to a very good Jest . . '

'ingenious . . 5. Well born or bred. Obs.
1638   F. Junius Painting of Ancients 286   Neither will any man who hath but a drop of ingenious bloud in his breast, trifle away both his art and time.
1692   J. Washington tr. Milton Def. People (1851) xii. 247   All manner of Slavery is scandalous and disgraceful to a freeborn ingenious Person.
1707   J. Chamberlayne Angliæ Notitia (ed. 22) iii. xi. 386 (Colleges London)   Any other thing that may any way contribute to the Accomplishment of an ingenious Nobleman or Gentleman.'

About Sunday 8 September 1661

Chris Squire UK   Link to this

Not unofficial but God-given: Sunday was the day of rest for servants as for their masters. So catching up on sleep would naturally have been the priority for both, once church had been dutifully attended.

About Friday 6 September 1661

Chris Squire UK   Link to this

‘Ambulatory’ is the mot juste to describe this world, a ‘walking-about’ culture where business was done on the street. This vanished way of life still persists in the fondness for ‘walking about money’ - a fat roll of £20 notes carried in a trouser pocket by those who pay and are paid in cash and frequent betting shops, etc..

About Monday 2 September 1661

Chris Squire UK   Link to this

OED has:

‘cellar I. A storeroom, and derived senses.
1. †a. In general sense. A storehouse or storeroom, whether above or below ground, for provisions; a granary, buttery, or pantry. Obs.
. . 1663 A. Cowley Ess. in Verse & Prose (1669) 131 Sellars and Granaries in vain we fill, With all the bounteous Summers store . .

. . c. spec. A storeroom for wine, ale, or the like; (hence) the contents of this; . .

2. a. A room below ground level in a house or other building, typically used for storage. This sense occurs contextually in some of the quots. at 1, and it is impossible to determine at what period the notion of ‘storeroom’ began to give way to that of ‘underground chamber’.
. . 1656 T. Blount Glossographia, Hypoge (hypogæum), a vault or cellar, or such like underground room . . ‘

‘pox . . 1.b . .
1601 H. Clapham Ælohim-triune xi, A third diuell whispers in the eares of some, And straight they slide to house of brothelrie: The pox, the vengeance, burning intrailes come Crying a loud.
1680 J. Bunyan Life & Death Mr. Badman 105 There often follows this foul sin, the Foul Disease, now called by us the Pox. A disease so nauseous and stinking, so infectious to the whole body (and so intailed to this sin) that hardly are any common with unclean Women, but they have more or less a touch of it to their shame.
1700 T. Brown Amusem. Serious & Comical x. 107 The Attorney picks your Pocket, and gives you Law for't; the Whore picks your Purse, and gives you the Pox for't it; and the Poet picks your Pocket, and gives you nothing for it . . ‘

About Sunday 1 September 1661

Chris Squire UK   Link to this

' . . Their relations were soon marred by **** [Pepys, 2.237, 3.4 spoiler], and by Samuel Pepys's consequent suspicion of Holmes's easy charm and liking for fine clothing . . ' [DNB]

No prizes for guessing what Holmes was suspected of by SP.

About Friday 30 August 1661

Chris Squire UK   Link to this

OED has:

‘pretty adj. . . 3. Used as a general term of admiration or appreciation.
a. Of a person: having all the requisite qualities, etc.; bold, gallant, brave; polite, respectable, etc.; worthy, admirable, splendid. Now chiefly U.S.
. . 1660 S. Pepys Diary 11 May (1970) I. 134 Dr. Clarke, who I find to be a very pretty man and very knowing . . ‘

About Tuesday 27 August 1661

Chris Squire UK   Link to this

I agree with Bill. SP would have used the title [even if it was just a courtesy title] of anyone who had one or referred to them as 'my lord'. This would be automatic in an age of rank and deference where title and rank counted for so much.

About Monday 26 August 1661

Chris Squire UK   Link to this

OED has:

‘stand . . 6. A state of being unable to proceed in thought, speech, or action; a state of perplexity or nonplus. Nearly always in the phrases to be at a stand , to put to a stand . .
. . 1657 E. D'Oyley Let. 28 Feb. in Coll. State Papers J. Thurloe (1742) VI. 834 The prints telling me, that the heads of their people are..accounted conspirators..hath put me to some stand how to carry myself towards them.
1739 tr. C. Rollin Anc. Hist. (ed. 2) IV. 212 There is one point however that puts me to a stand . . ‘