Annotations and comments

Chris Squire UK has posted 221 annotations/comments since 16 February 2013.

The most recent…

About Wednesday 13 November 1661

Chris Squire UK   Link to this

Adding in the 11 days adjustment for the old calendar takes us to Nov 24 New Style, past the transition from autumn to winter, a Little Ice Age winter much older than what we get nowadays.

DNB has: ‘ . . It was in the years 1668–70 that both James and Anne converted to Roman Catholicism. Anne was a devout woman who had practised secret confession since the age of twelve and who clearly valued the visual and the ritual elements in worship: Pepys saw her in James's ‘little pretty chapel’ at her ‘silly devotions’ . .

She gave birth to her eighth child, a daughter, on 9 February 1671, but by now her fatal illness, probably breast cancer, was in an advanced stage . . On 30 March she ate a hearty dinner, but fell ill that night and died at 3 p.m the following day . . ‘ [aged 34]

also:

‘ . . Her husband was certainly no match for her. He was widely seen as under her thumb: ‘the duke of York, in all things but his codpiece, is led by the nose by his wife’ (Pepys, 9.342) . . ‘

About Saturday 9 November 1661

Chris Squire UK   Link to this

OED has:

‘lace, n. < Old French laz . . < popular Latin *lacium a noose . .
5. a. Ornamental braid used for trimming men's coats, etc.; †a trimming of this. Now only in gold lace, silver lace, a braid formerly made of gold or silver wire, now of silk or thread with a thin wrapping of gold or silver.
. . 1634 H. Peacham Gentlemans Exercise (new ed.) 135 Garters deepe fringed with gold lace.
1684 Dryden Prol. Univ. Oxf. in Misc. Poems 272 Tack but a Copper-lace to Drugget sute . .

6. A slender open-work fabric of linen, cotton, silk, woollen, or metal threads, usually ornamented with inwrought or applied patterns. Often called after the place where it is manufactured, e.g. Brussels lace n. . .
. . 1613 (title) The King's edict prohibiting all his subjects from using any gold or silver, either fine or counterfeit; all embroiderie, and all lace of Millan, or of Millan fashion.
1715 J. Gay Epist. Earl Burlington 118 The busy town..Where finest lace industrious lasses weave.
lace-man n. a man who manufactures or deals in lace . .

1669 S. Pepys Diary 26 Apr. (1976) IX. 534 Calling at the laceman's for some lace for my new suit.’

About Friday 8 November 1661

Chris Squire UK   Link to this

OED has:

'scholar, n. Forms: OE scolere, scoliere, ME–16 scholer, ME scolere, ME–15 scoler, ME scolare, skolere, scolier, (Caxton escolyer), ME–15 scolar, ME–16 scoller, 15 scolear, scoleir, scollar, skoller, skolar, 15–16 scholler, schollar, schooler, 16 schoolar, skooller, skollar, ( sholar), 15–18 vulgar schollard, 18 scholard, 15– scholar.'

About Friday 8 November 1661

Chris Squire UK   Link to this

A ‘gent’ nowadays is recognised by his accent - well-spoken - and his manners - polite and often formal. He has usually has had a private education and he may - or may not - have money.

The OED has:

‘ . . 3. a. A man in whom gentle birth is accompanied by appropriate qualities and behaviour; hence, in general, a man of chivalrous instincts and fine feelings . .
1653 I. Walton Compl. Angler i. 13, I would rather prove my self to be a Gentleman, by being learned and humble, valiant and inoffensive, vertuous, and communicable, then by a fond ostentation of riches.
1710 R. Steele Tatler No. 207. ⁋4 The Appellation of Gentleman is never to be affixed to a Man's Circumstances, but to his Behaviour in them.
1743 N. Appleton Serm. 153 The Gentle-Man will treat every Man with due Respect, and will be friendly, yielding, condescending, obliging, and ready to do a Kindness . . ‘

which I take to be SP’s sense here.

The question still unanswered is:

‘When Adam delved and Eve span, Who was then the gentleman? . . ’
John Ball 1381
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Ball_(priest)

About Tuesday 5 November 1661

Chris Squire UK   Link to this

Re: 'seeming to go about business' - 'pretending' is what is meant, I think. when Sir W left he went with him but not to the office but to somewhere quiet at Lady B's where he could recover his addled wits.
...........
“Remember, remember,
the Fifth of November.
I see no reason
why Gunpowder Treason
should ever be forgot.”

Quite right too. The intent was to blow up the House of Lords when everyone of importance was in it and mount a coup to install a Roman Catholic monarch. The plot nearly succeeded. It would have led to civil war, pogroms against the Catholics and who knows what horror and terror - the Germans had the Thirty Years’ War 1618 - 1648. The United Kingdom had peace until the Civil Wars broke out in 1642.

About Sunday 3 November 1661

Chris Squire UK   Link to this

OED has;

‘genius . . II. Character, ability, and related senses.
6. a. A person's characteristic disposition; natural inclination; temperament. Obs.
a1586 Sir P. Sidney Apol. Poetrie (1595) sig. I3v, A Poet, no industrie can make, if his owne Genius bee not carried vnto it.
. . 1690 J. Evelyn Mem. (1857) III. 318 Its being suitable to my rural genius, born as I was at Wotton, among the woods.’

About Saturday 2 November 1661

Chris Squire UK   Link to this

The OED entry:

'fair-conditioned adj. (a) pleasant-natured, good-tempered (now rare) . .
1473 J. Paston in Paston Lett. & Papers (2004) I. 463 Wherffor, iff ye knowe any lykly men and fayre condycioned and good archerys, sende hem to me.
. . 1634 W. Laud Let. 9 Oct. in Wks. (1860) (modernized text) VII. 92 A very honest, fair-conditioned man.
1767 Addr. People of Eng. on Manners of Times 32 All others in proportion to the extent and influence of your character..will be just, fair conditioned, gentle . . ‘

About Thursday 31 October 1661

Chris Squire UK   Link to this

TMN: Someone usually publishes the expurgated text in the comments.

About Thursday 31 October 1661

Chris Squire UK   Link to this

Jane Clements, Director of Council of Christians and Jews: ;All Saints Day is traditionally called ‘All Hallows Day’ and is celebrated on November 1st. This is why 31st October is known as ‘All Hallows Eve’ or ‘Halloween’. It is a day for Christians to remember and celebrate those who lived before us and contributed to the life of the church and society . . All Souls Day, which follows on Nov 2nd, is usually a more solemn occasion. It’s an opportunity to remember together those who have died more recently, especially those we have loved and miss . . The modern date of All Souls' Day was first popularised in the early eleventh century after Abbot Odilo established it as a day for the monks of Cluny and associated monasteries to pray for the souls believed to be in purgatory (that is, between heaven and hell, paying for their sins before entering heaven).’

http://www.itv.com/news/london/2014-11-01/chris...

About Tuesday 29 October 1661

Chris Squire UK   Link to this

OED has:

‘naught . . C.adj. . . 1.c. Of food or drink: unwholesome, bad; unfit for consumption. Cf. naughty adj. 4b. Obs.
. . 1610 Bible (Douay) II. Jer. xxiv. 3 The good figges, exceeding good, and the naughtie figges exceeding naught: which can not be eaten because they are naught.
1661 S. Pepys Diary 29 Oct. (1970) II. 203 We..would have been merry; but their wine was so naught..that we were not so . . ‘