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Chris Squire UK has posted 480 annotations/comments since 16 February 2013.

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About Saturday 16 May 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘serve, v.1 < Old French . .
. . V. To treat in a specified manner . .
47. a. To treat in a specified (usually unpleasant or unfair) manner. Now chiefly colloq.
. . 1589 G. Puttenham Arte Eng. Poesie i. xxviii. 46 Or else be locked into the Church by the Sexten as I my selfe was once served reading an Epitaph in a certain cathedral Church of England.
a1616 Shakespeare Cymbeline (1623) v. vi. 248 She is serv'd, As I would serve a Rat.
. . 1727 J. Gay Fables I. v. 16 All cowards should be serv'd like you. . .

b. to serve (a person) right: to treat (an offender) as he deserves . . ‘

About Wednesday 13 May 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘plat, n.3 < Probably originally a variant of plot n
. . II. A diagram, outline, scheme, etc.
2. A plan, a diagram, a design, esp. a ground plan of a building or of an area of land; a map, a chart; = plot n. 3b. Now U.S.
†to set down in plat: to make a plan of (obs.).
. . 1582 in R. Hakluyt Diuers Voy. sig. H, To note all the Islands, and to set them downe in plat.
1669 S. Sturmy Mariners Mag. iv. xv. 196 To prick the same down in a Blank Chart or Mercator's Plat . . ‘

About Tuesday 12 May 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘stay, v.1 < Old French . . < Latin stāre . .
. . III. trans. To stop, arrest, check.
. . 20. a. To detain, hold back, stop (a person or thing); to check or arrest the progress of, bring to a halt; to hinder from going on or going away; to keep in a fixed place or position. Now only literary.
. . 1627 W. Duncomb tr. V. d'Audiguier Tragi-comicall Hist. our Times ii. 31 While the rain stayes you here.
. . 1686 tr. J. Chardin Trav. Persia 255 He stay'd me to dine with him . . ‘

About Monday 11 May 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

A ‘piece of eight’ was ‘a Spanish silver dollar, or peso, worth eight reals . . ’. The English pound was a piece of gold. So the exchange rate between them fluctuated as the relative value of the two precious metals varied, as it has throughout history. http://www.silverseek.com/article/45-year-recor... charts the Au/Ag ratio over 45 years: the range is 20 (1980) to 98 (1991); it is currently 80, so silver is very cheap (93rd %ile) relative to gold. The ratio was set at 12 by the Romans; it stayed in the range 14.5 - 15.5 from Pepys’ time to the 1870s; see: https://www.measuringworth.com/datasets/gold/re...

About Sunday 10 May 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re:‘ . . Pepys was now reminded of similar problems which had led to the national rising of 1637 . . ’

which led to the two Bishops’ Wars https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bishops%27_Wars which were ended by the Treaty of Ripon in October 1640. The impoverished King Chales I had to summon another parliament to grant him the supplies which he needed to pay the Scots off; this Long Parliament attacked his Government, impeaching (and eventually executing) his chief supporters, Strafford and Laud - and him, the Man of Blood. It sat until it was dissolved by Oliver Cromwell in 1653:

‘It is high time for me to put an end to your sitting in this place, which you have dishonored by your contempt of all virtue, and defiled by your practice of every vice . . Is there a single virtue now remaining amongst you? Is there one vice you do not possess? . . So! Take away that shining bauble there, and lock up the doors. In the name of God, go!’

http://www.britpolitics.co.uk/speeches-oliver-c...

About Friday 8 May 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED hasa:

‘cavil, v. < Old French . .
1. a. intr. ‘To raise captious and frivolous objections’ (Johnson); to object, dispute, or find fault unfairly or without good reason . .
. . 1635 J. Swan Speculum Mundi i. §3. 14 After this manner, such mockers reasoned and cavilled with S. Peter.
. . 1750 Bp. W. Warburton Lett. (1809) 61 Without finding anything considerable to cavil with you upon . . ‘

About Thursday 7 May 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

' . . Coincidentally at about the same time (before Cromwell died in September 11658), Pepys acquired a part-time place as teller in the exchequer under George Downing, after whom the street would be named . . ' [DNB]

About Thursday 30 April 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED says this was the original sense:

‘lionize, v.
. . 3. intr. To see the ‘lions’ of a place.
1825 C. M. Westmacott Eng. Spy I. 137 We sallied forth to lionize..which is the Oxford term for gazing about, usually applied to strangers . . ‘

Lionising applied to celebrities came later.

About Friday 24 April 1663

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

OED has:

‘eel < Old English ǽl . .
. . 1. d. salt eel: a rope's end used for flogging. Obs. [ < the use of an eel skin as a whip.]
1663 S. Pepys Diary 24 Apr. (1971) IV. 109 With my salt Eele went down in the parler, and there got my boy and did beat him.’