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Sasha Clarkson has posted 402 annotations/comments since 16 February 2013.

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About Friday 1 May 1663

Sasha Clarkson  •  Link

So Sam's dissembling to his dad and Tom about the true state of the accounts: he obviously thinks that Papa can't keep track of what's coming in OR going out.

This sounds unkind, but it's based on sober reality: remember that a couple of years ago, Sam audited his dad's affairs before he retired to Brampton and concluded:

"I find that all he hath in money of his own due to him in the world is but 45l., and he owes about the same sum: so that I cannot but think in what a condition he had left my mother if he should have died before my uncle Robert."

That is, after a lifetime of work, his net worth was zero. The implication is that even then, John senior was neither managing his finances, nor aware of his precise situation.

http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1661/08/26/

About Thursday 30 April 1663

Sasha Clarkson  •  Link

I expect that the Royal Exchange would be a good place to meet people casually and swap news and gossip. Although, in 1662, it was estimated that "384,000 people lived in the City of London, the Liberties, Westminster and the out-parishes"*, I would imagine that number of prosperous people in "The square mile" of the City, would be small enough for there to be a good chance of Sam casually meeting friends and acquaintances in the Exchange.

*https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Plague_of_London#The_recording_of_deaths

About Monday 27 April 1663

Sasha Clarkson  •  Link

I suspect that Wayneman is an orphan, as it's his big brother Will and sister Jane who both advise him and plead his case.

Note that the beatings do not seem to concern his siblings: they still think that the Pepys household is the best place for him. This does not surprise me. Corporal punishment was the norm in British homes and schools until the 1980s, since when attitudes have changed vastly. They were already changing slowly in my own childhood in the 1960s, but practice varied between schools and communities. The worst experiences I have heard of were from friends who went to Roman Catholic schools in the North of England. Interestingly enough, the most deliberate cruelty was always from the teaching nuns.

About Monday 27 April 1663

Sasha Clarkson  •  Link

The end of Captain Browne: I wonder what happened to the seaman who struck him? There's no mention in the diary of his fate.

The penalty for murder was hanging of course, but an experienced seaman might well be able to escape and find a berth.

About Monday 27 April 1663

Sasha Clarkson  •  Link

A week taking "physique" - ie laxative: the mind boggles!

BTW San Diego Sarah: those were good and very helpful annotations you put on Captain Browne's page! :)

About Friday 24 April 1663

Sasha Clarkson  •  Link

"Was it the beating he gave the boy that gave him so much pleasure?"

It does help to read the full entry: it's very clear from the context what gave Sam the pleasure!

About Friday 24 April 1663

Sasha Clarkson  •  Link

The world was harsh in the seventeenth century. Sam would undoubtedly have been beaten at St Paul's. Military discipline, especially in the navy, was brutal for adults: Wayneman will grow up all too soon, and if Sam can't offer him a place, then the navy might be one of his few options.

Although the principle was established with the Cardwell reforms of 1868, flogging was not finally abolished in the British military until 1880. Even the Russians got there first, with Alexander II's "great reforms" of the 1860s.