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Louise Hudson has posted 104 annotations/comments since 9 November 2013.

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About Wednesday 27 August 1662

Louise Hudson  •  Link

"But when I came home I found him there at his ease in his study, which vexed me cruelly, that he should no more mind me, but to let me be all alone at the office waiting for him. Whereupon I struck him, and did stay up till 12 o’clock at night chiding him for it, and did in plain terms tell him that I would not be served so, and that I am resolved to look out some boy that I may have the bringing up of after my own mind, and which I do intend to do, for I do find that he has got a taste of liberty since he came to me that he will not leave. "

Yessirree, Sam, don't let those lower classes try to rise above their stations. God himself wants it that way. A good cuff should put the likes of poor Will in his rightful place--and all's right with the world.

About Monday 11 August 1662

Louise Hudson  •  Link

Speaking of "walking on the  roof"' I have come to doubt that walking on the lead(s) means that. A "lead" is also the path that leads from the street to the house. This would make more sense than walking on the roof! Most roofs were steeply pitched in the 1600s and walking on  the roof seems very odd in any case. Is it possible that a lead did not mean the roof but a path to the house?

About Monday 11 August 1662

Louise Hudson  •  Link

Everyone knows that servants are not people. They are, well, servants, hardly of any value at all. They were to be unseen and unheard, in other words, not present at all.

About Wednesday 6 August 1662

Louise Hudson  •  Link

The question should be, Is Sam a man or a mouse?

A rat, I think, judging by his plans for his "wench." He should be shut up in a desk.

About Friday 1 August 1662

Louise Hudson  •  Link

For a man who goes to church nearly every Sunday, sometimes twice, Sam doesn't seem to have taken in much when it comes to Christian morality, especially adultery, yet there it is in black and white, in the 10 Commandments along with the one about coveting one's neighbor's wife. But, of course, the maids were not married, so were fair game. Perhaps he and his cohorts had defined adultery as taking a married woman and it was not adultery if she wasn't married. I suppose they didn't think it could be adultery if it didn't involve taking another man's "property." He, along with most men in his time, believed any poor, unmarried girl was fair game--a gift to men from God. As for his concern that he might be refused, I think it had more to do with his wife finding out if the girl was uninterested and might take revenge.  I don't have much respect for Sam's morals, even if he was only doing what other men like him were doing. Going to church was apparently just for show and to look like a respectable man to his superiors, not for any religious lessons. I shake my head in despair, but men's attitudes haven't changed much to this day. Just the laws have changed after centuries of resistance by men like Pepys. At least we have that.

About Friday 18 July 1662

Louise Hudson  •  Link

"My" dining room . . . "my" house. I guess Beth is a guest or, worse, the help.

I know, I know, a different time, but still . . .

About Tuesday 15 July 1662

Louise Hudson  •  Link

I think we may forget how young Pepys' wife was. Though they were married for 7 years she was only 22 in 1662 when this diary entry was written. She was still a young girl. She should have been "merry", especially when she was out with people close to her age.

About Saturday 12 July 1662

Louise Hudson  •  Link

I won't soon forget Maggie Smith on Downton Abbey, asking whitheringly, "What is a week-end?" And that was supposed to be in the 20th century.

About Thursday 26 June 1662

Louise Hudson  •  Link

Worms in fish won't kill you. There are worms in fish even today and we've all probably feasted on them. Preservation methods being so primitive in Pepys' time would have meant most fish were infested. Rather than pickling, per se, fish were probably brined with salt--though not long enough on the day sturgeon was placed before Pepys.

The refrigerator was, no doubt, a matter of simultaneous invention, like the typewriter. Everyone on earth needed to preserve food and everyone needed a reliable way to do it. Someone, somewhere was bound to come up with mechanical refrigeration sooner or later. The person(s) who got it going would have been the one(s) who got the credit, which has happened with most inventions (of which necessity is always the mother).

About Sunday 22 June 1662

Louise Hudson  •  Link

Although the London Foundling Hospital was not established until 1741, it provides a look into how abandoned babies were cared for in those years (not too well, of course). It is open to the public and is well worth a trip. It's at Brunswick Square. It's a view of history we don't often get--the history of the common people who struggled to survive in crushing poverty.