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Louise Hudson has posted 142 annotations/comments since 9 November 2013.

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About Sunday 8 February 1662/63

Louise Hudson  •  Link

Hives, also known as urticaria. More likely than lice. An old remedy was to place stinging nettles on the inflamed areas. Today a doctor would give a shot of anti-histimine. Calamine lotion would have helped, too. How awful to live in the days before modern medicine. Did Sam say what he'd been eating? Shellfish is often the culprit. Other foods, too.

About Saturday 7 February 1662/63

Louise Hudson  •  Link

There is a comprehensive history called Pepys's Navy: Ships, Men and Warfare 1649-89
by J. D. Davies 

It has received excellent reviews.

It's available through Amazon.

About Sunday 1 February 1662/63

Louise Hudson  •  Link

"and so home and had a good dinner with my wife, with which I was pleased to see it neatly done, and this troubled me to think of parting with Jane, that is come to be a very good cook."

Serves you right, Sam.

About Wednesday 28 January 1662/63

Louise Hudson  •  Link

". . .which vexes me cruelly, but it cannot be helped". It sounds to me as if Sam is saying he feels sorry for the incident and E's loss but he has no intention of buying another one. "There, there, dry your tears, dear, it can't be helped. I'm off to the office."

About Wednesday 21 January 1662/63

Louise Hudson  •  Link

Sam doesn't seem to have the least twinge of conscience about spending a whole day at the office, going out in the evening, enjoying the ladies and generally having a good time while his wife is sick in bed, no matter what the cause of her pain was.. Monthies or toothache or something else, he apparently doesn't give her a second thought if there's his "work" to do, fun to be had and ladies to admire. Out of sight, out of mind. He doesn't mention in the diary about being worried about his wife all day and evening, who he has left in great distress. but he does write about Mrs, Ackworth being "a pretty and modest woman" who spins so well. What a guy!

About Wednesday 14 January 1662/63

Louise Hudson  •  Link

E. might have had nothing else to do but have children, as Gerald Berg says, but that was common at the time and for centuries after. Even having something else to do would probably not have affected the longing for a baby . Even today, when women are "liberated" (in a way never dreamed of by E. or her co-horts) and have plenty to do, many still pine for a baby , often going to great lengths to have one. In E's day there was nothing to be done except to drink an occasional witch's brew from a midwife. I feel sorry for her and wish she had written a diary so we could know her other than solely through Sam. I wonder if there were any diaries from women at the time that have survived. Of course, they would be less likely to have been saved, being considered women's silly scribblings, best disposed of.

About Wednesday 14 January 1662/63

Louise Hudson  •  Link

After reading a few of these posts, it occurs to me why Elisabeth is as lonely as she is. She is pining for a baby. Nothing is going to fill that loneliness, though a companion might offer a pretense of help. It won't bring her peace or contentment and Sam will probably never understand it. Even the letters he destroyed were probably helping her to deal wih the lonliness.

About Tuesday 13 January 1662/63

Louise Hudson  •  Link

Not a word is ever said about vegetables or fruit. Not even potatoes, just meat. Sam doesn't even mention bread. I guess Yorkshire pudding hadn't made its way to London yet.  It's no wonder people had severe digestive complaints in those days. 
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He refers to his  "poor" wife. He is probably saying she is unhappy with the work she has to do and Sam's uncaring and controlling attitude. So he refers to her as a "poor" girl, not that Sam would do much to make her life easier. She has her duty to serve him, and her burden to bear, after all, and if she complains, well, too bad--she'll remain a "poor" wife and she should be happy to have as much as he deigns to give her. 
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What changed domestic help as much as anything were modern conveniences--flush toilets, dishwashers, washing machines, vacuum cleaners. It was cheaper, easier and more efficient to buy machinery to do the work than to hire people, and people who would work as servants became less and less available after WWI. Growing up in the 50s, in the US, we never had one servant in our house--except for my grandmother, but we had a few of the other, somewhat primitive by today's standards,  labor-saving appliances, such as a wringer washer. Clothes were hung out on clotheslines to dry, even in freezing weather. What luxury!

About Saturday 3 January 1662/63

Louise Hudson  •  Link

"and the getting of the bills well over for my building of my house here, which however are as small and less than any of the others."

I take that to mean less than any of the other bills he has to pay.