Tuesday 19 July 1664

Up, and to the office, where we sat all the morning. At noon dined alone at home. After dinner Sir W. Batten and I down by water to Woolwich, where coming to the ropeyarde we are told that Mr. Falconer, who hath been ill of a relapse these two days, is just now dead. We went up to his widow, who is sicke in bed also. The poor woman in great sorrow, and entreats our friendship, which we shall, I think, in every thing do for her. I am sure I will. Thence to the Docke, and there in Sheldon’s garden eat some fruit; so to Deptford a little, and thence home, it raining mightily, and being cold I doubted my health after it. At the office till 9 o’clock about Sir W. Warren’s contract for masts, and then at home with Lanyon and Yeabsly till 12 and past about their contract for Tangier, wherein they and I differed, for I would have it drawn to the King’s advantage, as much as might be, which they did not like, but parted good friends; however, when they were gone, I wished that I had forborne any disagreement till I had had their promise to me in writing. They being gone, I to bed.

15 Annotations

Terry F   Link to this

"The poor woman in great sorrow, and entreats our friendship, which we shall, I think, in every thing do for her. I am sure I will."

The widow of the Clerk of the ropeyard is in quite desperate straits, methinks. Kevin Peter notes in her husband's Encyclopedia entry: "On 6 March 1663, Pepys visits Mr. Falconer at his home Woolwich. On that visit, Pepys mentions that Mr. Falconer has recently married his maid." What will Pepys do?

JWB   Link to this

Yeabsly

Yebb is a diminutive of Edmund.

Terry F   Link to this

"Yebb is a diminutive of Edmund."

But "Jeb" is not. Whew!

Paul Dyson   Link to this

Yeabsly

Yeabsley is an English surname with Devon and Kent connections - see Ancestry.com for a distribution map relating to the later C19th. According to L&M Yeabsly is based at Portsmouth (Hampshire) and Lanyon at Plymouth (Devon).

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...for I would have it drawn to the King's advantage, as much as might be, which they did not like, but parted good friends; however, when they were gone, I wished that I had forborne any disagreement till I had had their promise to me in writing."

So, the course one might have followed might be to suggest quietly would they prefer it to the King's... And presumably the nation's...Disadvantage? And if so, that perhaps the agreement was not the just and fair contract honest Sam Pepys, diligent servant to the Crown expected. And therefore he might, sadly, have to recommend it be cancelled.

But then there's that lovely 300ls per annum...Which doth so overjoy.

By the way, Sam...Are you quite sure you want this in writing?

***

Terry F   Link to this

The Diary of John Evelyn

July 19. To Lond. to see the event of the Lottery, which his Majestie had permitted Sir Arth: Slingsby to set up for one day in the Banqueting house at whitehall: I gaining onely a trifle, as well as did the King, Queene Consort, & Q: Mother for neere 30 lotts: which was thought to be contriv'd very un-handsomely by the master of it, who was in truth a meer shark:
***

cape henry   Link to this

Precisely what I wondered, RG. Could it be that Pepys has counted his pounds before they are minted? And also, could it be that the written contract he wants might not contain the L300 clause?

"And to Secretary Pepys, L300 annual graft."

Don't think so.

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

"I am sure I will."

Uh oh.

"By the way, Sam...Are you quite sure you want this in writing?"

It's stunning, isn't it? I was describing the Diary today to a friend at lunch, and gushing over Pepys' willingness to (for the most part) examine his own life so honestly and openly. Few of us would be willing or able to do this, and do it so well.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Supernumerary expenses, CH, supernumerary expenses.

"Pepys? About this 300Ls in 'supernumerary expense'?"

"Ummn...Well, Mr. Coventry...I..."

"Yes, I didn't quite follow it either but I was talking to Povy and he suggests from his past experience as Tangier treasurer that it was meant as a gratuity, no doubt for the senior official of the office. Naturally I can't accept it alone...It might appear, well...Compromising. So I plan to divide it with Povy. See it's properly noted, would you, old fellow? It's such a pittance really it would never bother the Duke or the King but I shouldn't want it to appear underhanded or obscured in any way."

Ah, heh...Ah...

"Oh and make sure you include 10Ls of it for yourself, Pepys. Now, don't be troubled, man. I know how you feel about such things what with your stand against Batten and his creatures, and I do agree we must avoid any conflict with the King's interest but it's standard practice and the King and Duke will be made aware. There's a good fellow."

JWB   Link to this

Mr. Falconer
RIP
"...still in his chamber... fit for business".
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1662/08/08/

Dan Jenkins   Link to this

Whilst a head louse must feed within a day or die, their unhatched nits can be around for up to a fortnight. If they were body lice, then they can lie dormant for a month. So, the barber might well be the source.

With his shorter hair (under the periwig), Sam ought to have had an easier time keeping louse free. Of course a simple exchange of hats for a moment could make him lousy.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Mr. Falconer
RIP
"...still in his chamber... fit for business"."

A most worthy Pepysian epitaph...

jeannine   Link to this

From "Journal of the Earl of Sandwich" edited by R.C. Anderson, today's entry reads:

19th. Tuesday. From Rochester I travelled to Canterbury and there lodged that night. Went to the Cathedral and viewed it diligently. In the coat of Cardinal Pole I found quartered the Arms of Mountagu and Mont Hermer.

Australian Susan   Link to this

Re the above: the Pole family came from Suffolk, so presumably this explains the Montagu quartering - both being East Anglian families and likely to intermarry.

tonyt   Link to this

Henry Pole, the brother of Cardinal Reginald Pole, was created 1st Baron Montagu in 1514 but I have not traced how (if at all) this linked up with the branch of the Montagus from which Sandwich came.

Henry had the title taken away from him shortly before his execution in 1539.

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