Saturday 12 May 1660

This morning I inquired for my boy, whether he was come well or no, and it was told me that he was well in bed.

My Lord called me to his chamber, he being in bed, and gave me many orders to make for direction for the ships that are left in the Downs, giving them the greatest charge in the world to bring no passengers with them, when they come after us to Scheveling Bay, excepting Mr. Edward Montagu, Mr. Thomas Crew, and Sir H. Wright.

Sir R. Stayner hath been here early in the morning and told my Lord, that my Lord Winchelsea understands by letters, that the Commissioners are only to come to Dover to attend the coming over of the King. So my Lord did give order for weighing anchor, which we did, and sailed all day.

In our way in the morning, coming in the midway between Dover and Calais, we could see both places very easily, and very pleasant it was to me that the further we went the more we lost sight of both lands.

In the afternoon at cards with Mr. North and the Doctor. There by us, in the Lark frigate, Sir R. Freeman and some others, going from the King to England, come to see my Lord and so onward on their voyage.

In the afternoon upon the quarterdeck the Doctor told Mr. North and me an admirable story called “The Fruitless Precaution,” an exceeding pretty story and worthy my getting without book when I can get the book.[??]

This evening came Mr. Sheply on board, whom we had left at Deal and Dover getting of provision and borrowing of money.

In the evening late, after discoursing with the Doctor, &c., to bed.


22 Annotations

Todd Bernhardt  •  Link

Is Sam making a joke here?

re: "worthy my getting without book when I can get the book." Is he inflicting pun-ishment on his diary (and its gentle readers) by using the first instance of the word "book" as another word for "delay"?

Also, where did the bracketed notations in the entry above come from?

Nix  •  Link

Looks more to me like either a jumbled transcription in the Project Gutenberg version or a jumbled deciphering of the original.

melinda trapelo  •  Link

I'm not sure, but I think "...getting without book" means "learning to tell the story from memory" (instead of reading it from a book).
So in other words, he wants to learn to recite the story, as soon as he can obtain the book it's printed in.
It does look weird, though... does anyone with access to reference books have any answers?
And I'd love to see the actual story! If it can be found, maybe it can go in the background information.

Nix  •  Link

The Fruitless Precaution --

Pepys is probably referring to a story of that title by the French writer Paul Scarron, who coincidentally died in 1660.

Paul Brewster  •  Link

[??]
My copy of the Wheatley lacks the [??] and L&M make no note of any difficulty in this passage. As best I can tell it originates with the Gutenberg edition

Lance  •  Link

Without Book
"Without book.
(a) By memory.
(b) Without authority."

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913), found at:

http://dict.die.net/without%20book/

Paul Brewster  •  Link

“The Fruitless Praecaution,”
L&M footnotes this as "One of the 'novels' of the French writer Paul Scarron(d. 1660). It is clear from the entry at 16 October 1660 that Pepys is referring to an English version: three of the tales had been translated and published separately in 1657 by John Davies of Kidwelly. For the editions, see DNB, 'Davies'; A Esdaile, List of Engl. tales ... pub. before 1740, pp 301-3; ... Pepys did not retain any in the Pepysian Library."

A reference for John Davies can be found at http://www.kidwellyhistory.co.uk/Articles/JohnD...

A reference for Paul Scarron can be found at http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/13516a.htm

Paul Brewster  •  Link

"my Lord Winchelsea understands by letters, that the Commissioners are only to come to Dover to attend the coming over of the King."
The L&M footnote states that "This was a misunderstanding. The commissioners had been instructed to make 'Speedy Repair to such Place where His Majesty shall be' ... They took ship on the Hampshire and the Yarmouth and arrived off Scheveningen on the evening of the 14th."

Paul Brewster  •  Link

the Lark frigate
according to Wheatley it "... carried ten guns and forty men. Its captain was Thomas Levidge."

chip  •  Link

Did they not gamble at cards? SP does not mention winning or losing.

andy thomas  •  Link

"and very pleasant it was to me that the further we went the more we lost sight of both lands".

Sam's evocative way of saying how much they were aware that things were now starting to change, soemthing new is happening.

Glyn  •  Link

"that the Commissioners are only to come to Dover to attend the coming over of the King"

See Paul Brewster's annotation above. As I read it, Montagu had delayed the ship by a day to rendevouz with the Commissioners to take them to the King in Europe; but they thought they were to wait for the king in Dover, England, so now Montagu has ordered the Naseby and the fleet to set sail for the Continent.

vk  •  Link

Scarron's "Précaution inutile" will be adapted by Moliere in two years as "School for Wives". I don't know what liberties Moliere takes with the story, but if you read that play or a summary of it, you'll probably get the gist of what amused Pepys so much. (Scarron's story is not on-line, and probably not available at any but university libraries.)

jeannine  •  Link

Sandwich's Journal Entry Today

"Saturday. About eight of the clock in the morning we set sail and turned to windward, and in the afternoon anchored again, the South Foreland bearing W.S.W. about four leagues off."

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Since vk wrote "Scarron's story is not on-line" Google has put a great many Books online, including one containing the text of “The Fruitless Precaution.” -- see the link to the title in the entry above, and then to the annotation.

Bill  •  Link

Without book. by memory; by repetition; without reading.
---A Dictionary of the English Language, Samuel Johnson, 1755

Sasha Clarkson  •  Link

For whom and from whom was Shepley "borrowing of money"?

Tonyel  •  Link

"gave me many orders to make for direction for the ships that are left in the Downs, giving them the greatest charge in the world to bring no passengers with them, when they come after us to Scheveling Bay, excepting Mr. Edward Montagu, Mr. Thomas Crew, and Sir H. Wright."

Is this Sandwich making sure that only the "right" people accompany him to the King, or merely that Charles' entourage will require a lot of empty cabins?

Bill  •  Link

Tonyel, probably both reasons, but I think lots of people are crossing the Channel independently. A veritable hoard I would imagine.

Gillian Bagwell  •  Link

Regarding "without book": "On book" and "off book" are still very much in use in theatre. Director to cast: "I want you off book by the end of the second week of rehearsal." "He broke his leg and his understudy wasn't ready and had to go on on book."

To be "on book" also means to follow along in the script during rehearsal, when actors are in the process of getting off book, so they can call for a line ("Line!") and be prompted.

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