1893 text

Schevingen, the port of the Hague.

4 Annotations

vincent   Link to this

Den Haag or 's-Gravenhageg
then to Scheveningen (the strand)
the beach resort of the Hague: a nice picture of beach 1880 to give one the idea of the fun sailors had in earlier years.
Is it Holland?;is it Netherlands?
http://home-2.tiscali.nl/~aarde01/scheveningen.htm
http://home-2.tiscali.nl/~aarde01/dhd010.htmSch... olde map
http://odur.let.rug.nl/~welling/maps/janssonius...
other events in netherlands their history of the times of commerce and the wars for freedom:
http://www.zum.de/whkmla/region/lowcountries/er...

Wim van der Meij   Link to this

Scheveningen was also an important base for a fishing fleet. The flatbottomed ships were sailed onto the beach at high tide and sailed out again at a following high tide. So at low tide they could be reached for unloading etc.
Holland is the western part of the Netherlands, but, to the chagrin of the Dutch outside that part, most of the world uses the name Holland for the whole country.
Also: it is 's-Gravenhage, so without the added -g-.

Terry F   Link to this

Scheveningen in Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scheveningen

Bill   Link to this

The traveller will not leave the Hague without visiting the little fishing town of SCHEVELING or Scheveningen, two miles distant. An avenue perfectly straight, thickly planted with oaks and limes, and nearly two miles in length, leads to it. The steeple of Scheveling is visible on the first entrance of the avenue. It consists of about 300 houses chiefly inhabited by fishermen, but presenting an appearance of neatness no where to be seen except in Holland. The beach is firm and constantly crowded by pedestrians. The church is situated at the extremity of the village and contains the skull of a whale fifty six feet in length, which was thrown on shore in 1617.
---The Belgian traveller. Edmund Boyce, 1827.

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