Wednesday 12 September 1666

Up, and with Sir W. Batten and Sir W. Pen to St. James’s by water, and there did our usual business with the Duke of Yorke. Thence I to Westminster, and there, spoke with Michell and Howlett, who tell me how their poor young ones are going to Shadwell’s. The latter told me of the unkindness of the young man to his wife, which is now over, and I have promised to appear a counsellor to him. I am glad she is like to be so near us again. Thence to Martin, and there did ‘tout ce que je voudrais avec’ her, and drank, and away by water home and to dinner, Balty and his wife there. After dinner I took him down with me to Deptford, and there by the Bezan loaded above half my goods and sent them away. So we back home, and then I found occasion to return in the dark and to Bagwell, and there … did do all that I desired, but though I did intend ‘pour avoir demeurais con elle’ to-day last night, yet when I had done ‘ce que je voudrais I did hate both elle and la cose’, and taking occasion from the occasion of ‘su marido’s return … did me lever’, and so away home late to Sir W. Pen’s (Balty and his wife lying at my house), and there in the same simple humour I found Sir W. Pen, and so late to bed.


16 Annotations

Terry Foreman  •  Link

The Royal Society today at Gresham College — from the Hooke Folio Online

Sep. 12. 1666. (- mr. mercator produced his watch againe and declared that his demonstrations for it consisted only in this that he Could shew his tables of aequations were true, and that the motion Represented thereof in his watch agreed wth those tables).

mr. Hooke presented his new prospectiue for taking angles by Reflections which was approued of by the company, he also was desired to bring the Description of it in writing.

(consideration about their meeting place.)
[ Gresham College also being used as a temporary Exchange. Cf. last Friday's Pepys Diary annote: http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1666/09/07/#c2852… ]

Heuelius disposed 4 books.

http://webapps.qmul.ac.uk/cell/Hooke/hooke_folio.…

Terry Foreman  •  Link

….”“Thence to Martin, and there did tout ce que je voudrais avec her [ all that I liked with her ], and drank,....So we back home, and then I found occasion to return in the dark and to Bagwell, and there nudo in lecto con ella [naked in bed with her] did do all that I desired; but though I did intend para aver demorado con ella toda la night [to have stayed with her all night], yet when I had done ce que je voudrais [done what I wanted], I did hate both ella and la cosa [ hate both her and the thing, i.e. sex / her body ]; and taking occasion from the uncertainty of su marido's return esta noche, did me levar [uncertainty of her husband's return that night, did get up]; and so away home late to Sir W.Pen's...."
http://www.pepys.info/bits3.html#thirty

Robert Gertz  •  Link

"... I have promised to appear a counsellor to him."

Spoiler

There is no kindness or neighborlyness in this...It's merely another step in Sam's seduction plan, the little...

Robert Gertz  •  Link

Though of course it is a howl to picture our model husband offered as an example to young Mitchell.

Mary  •  Link

Shadwell.

According to the L&M edition this refers to the area between Limehouse and Wapping on the north bank of the Thames. The ['s] is spurious; this is nothing to do with either Thomas Shadwell (Clerk to the Auditor of the Receipt in the Exchequer) or the other Thomas Shadwell (dramatist and Restoration wit).

Lawrence  •  Link

Thank you Terry for translating sam's "bagwell thing", although I know about him playing in the muck, I still find it a little shocking! I wonder if he ever looked back at what he'd wrote in his dotage?

A. De Araujo  •  Link

"I did hate both elle and la cose"
"Post coitum omne animalium triste est"

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"I wonder if he ever looked back at what he’d wrote in his dotage?"

Or, Lawrence, when Ekizabeth had died.

CGS  •  Link

Every human seeks pleasure, when obtained, seeks more or greater, 'tis the genes thing.
As spelt out by I.N..
We keep doing it until punished [liberties taken of the great laws]and if we do nothing, we will continue still do nutin.
We continue to do it because we like the result.

Every kiss will get a reaction , [pleasure or pain ]
slap or kiss back.

All good times must end as it is not balanced by the the others seeking their pleasure.

What ever we do there is always some one out there that disapproves that you do it.

Every human has to satisfy what they see, what they hear, what they smell, what they touch , what they taste.

When they get to the last line sans eyes, sans teeth, sans everything then sweet memories of days of your.

Ralph Berry  •  Link

Very nicely put CGS.

Human nature has not changed. The men that rise to the top are usually endowed with too much testosterone, the Kennedy brothers, Bellasconi, Mettiaran (not sure of my spelling here) and plenty others. There seems to be a relationship between power and sex, the strong bull gathering a herd around him!!

Lawrence  •  Link

"Or, Lawrence, when Ekizabeth had died"
I've often wondered about this, but I think reading that would have racked him with guilt, and if he had looked in to his journal? he may have edited it? so my guess for what it's worth is... he didn't look to closely? but couldn't throw it away, I think most of us couldn't either? and I for one am glad!

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"spoke with Michell and Howlett, who tell me how their poor young ones are going to Shadwell’s."

L&M: Young Mitchell (newly married to Betty Howlett) had kept a strongwater house in Thames St, now destroyed in the Fire.

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

1666 September -- It took more than a week for the news of the Great Fire to reach Paris.

Publicly Louis IV said that he would not have "any rejoicings about it, being such a deplorable accident involving injury to so many unhappy people" and offered his condolences to Dowager Queen Henrietta Maria, his aunt, then living in Paris. He offered to send aid, food and other disaster relief.

Privately he was thrilled at his stroke of good fortune. He had made a mess of his summer campaign, and the French fleet was in no position to fight. He believed the English maritime supplies and magazines had been destroyed, which would force the English to retire from the War.

More information see 1666: Plague, War and Hellfire by Rebecca Rideal -- St. Martin' Press, New York -- 2016 -- ISBN 978-1-250-09707-2 (hard back) -- page 199

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

"...I took him [Balty] down with me to Deptford, and there by the Bezan loaded above half my goods and sent them away. So we back home,
... and so away home late to Sir W. Pen’s (Balty and his wife lying at my house), ..."

I only remember him saying that the Joyce home and his father's old house had burned down. No mention of what has happened to the Saint Michel Seniors, or Esther's home, or where the four Joyces and uncle and aunt Wight are camping.

Now Pepys has some furniture back in his house, he can accommodate Balty and Esther in more comfort than anywhere else available to them. Plus they can supervise the clean up and unpacking, freeing him up to do what exactly tomorrow?

Sometimes he makes it hard to like him.

Gerald Berg  •  Link

When was the last time Sam and Liz had sex? Has he ever confirmed he does have sex with his wife?

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

"... but I think reading that would have racked him with guilt, ..."

Nah ... he sat back in his rocker with his pipe in his mouth, and a fine wine on the side table. Smiling, he contemplated his scrapes as a younger man. "Those were the days, m'boy. We had fun, didn't we? Got some things done too, mind you. We showed them, damned de Witts. It was sad my poor wife died young, but ... she had problems, y'know. Catholic. But did I ever tell you about the time she met Bagwell in the office? I thought I would die of heart failure in front of y'all."

Hewer smiled. "You blushed easily, so we guessed something was up. She was a very handsome woman. Whatever happened to Betty Lane? I loved her sense of humor, and she always brought cake to the office when she wanted information. -- Oh, you didn't know she did that?" etc. etc. etc.

Old people don't waste time feeling guilt about loving people. We feel guilt about all the people we didn't love, the adventures not taken, the days wasted inside doing paperwork, instead of running around this beautiful world, experiencing life's rich pageant. He might have felt guilty for giving up on Wayneman. Pepys lived his life fully, by the standards and morals of his times, and I feel confident he was, on the whole, pleased with his achievements.

Mind you, there are quite a few days I don't like him.

Log in to post an annotation.

If you don't have an account, then register here.