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San Diego Sarah has posted 2539 annotations/comments since 6 August 2015.

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About Sunday 21 October 1666

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

"On their return to England Thomas Killigrew became groom of the bedchamber and later, chamberlain to Catherine of Braganza, while his wife was appointed first lady of the queen's privy chamber."

Thomas Killigrew's first wife, Cecilia Crofts Killigrew, was a Maid of Honor to Queen Henrietta Maria. She died in 1638.

His second wife, Charlotte de Hesse Killigrew, was not in Catherine of Braganza's entourage that I can find.

"First lady of the privy chamber" was a term that ended with Queen Elizabeth. Catherine's ladies were called "Ladies of the Bedchamber". They main ones were:
• 1663–1667: Katherine Stanhope, Countess of Chesterfield
• 1663–1673: Barbara Villiers Palmer, Countess of Castlemaine
• 1663–1681: Barbara Villiers Wenman Wentworth Howard, Countess of Suffolk
• 1663–1688: Mary Fairfax Villiers, Duchess of Buckingham
• 1663–1688: Jane Wyche Granville, Countess of Bath

Charlotte de Hesse Killigrew was too mature (and married) to be a Lady-in-Waiting. But no one seems to have written much about her on line, so I can't unravel this entry more than this.

About Sunday 21 October 1666

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

"... my boy and Jane ..."

I think this is the first time I've seen the two mentioned in one sentence. Tom Edwards is a "boy" and I think we concluded he was about 14 when he joined the Pepys household, making him around 16 now. Jane Birch is an experienced and appreciated maid. I think she was about 13 when the Diary started, making her about 20 now. SPOILER: And these two get married later in life. Should we rethink their ages -- or was she a cougar?

About Sunday 21 October 1666

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

"(Sir William being below with the fleete)"

Admiral Penn is overseeing what fleet repairs and dock and fort building can be done. The fleet is anchored at the Nore (a long east-west sandbank producing a large stretch of calmer water used by the navy as a convenient anchorage) which lies just off the Ness at what today is the town of Sheerness.

When the second Anglo-Dutch war began in March 1665, the Dutch and English faced each other across the North Sea, dictating the likely arena for engagements, meaning maintenance would fall to the three dockyards, hours of sailing time up river on the Thames and Medway.

The Admiralty decided the broad mudflats exposed at low tide on the southern side of the Ness could be used for more than the careening of ships' hulls, and in the spring of 1665 a small ready-to-use victualing storehouse was erected adjacent to the foreshore. As readily available supplies of spare masts, yards, rigging and canvas came into demand to keep the fighting ships at sea, a stockpile of stores was developed at Sheerness in what rapidly became a ramshackle little depot.

On 18 August, 1665 the Navy Board landed at Sheerness to survey the ground and layout the proposed new dockyard.
https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1665/08/18/#c544…

In mid-November 1665 it was announced large warships could now be refitted at Sheerness Dockyard adjacent to which, at the Ness, they started building a fort to contain 29 pieces of ordnance, but progress on the fort was slow.

The Sheerness fort was part of a nationwide awareness that invasion by the Dutch was a probability, especially after Holmes' Bonfire.

SPOILER: Sheerness fort was still not completed by June 1667. No doubt we'll find out if Penn catches blame for that later.

About Monday 22 October 1666

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

Sir W. Temple to Ormonde
[Sir William Temple is Special Envoy to Brussels
Written from: Brussels
Date: 22 October 1666
Shelfmark: MS. Carte 47, fol(s). 300
Document type: Holograph

The season of action seems to be wholly past, by the returning of the fleets into their ports, and so has made way for that of negotiation ...

The French are grown tame - everywhere but in their Gazettes; and have very calmly given the Marquess here the liberty of raising a new fort upon the frontiers, which [So in MS.] is already in defence, almost in sight of Philipville, which [So in MS.] covers this town, and that whole Frontier, and is [So in MS.] by all allowed to be owing to our war with France - which has plainly broke all their ambitious measures. ...
http://www.bodley.ox.ac.uk/dept/scwmss/projects/c…

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Former Parliamentarian Sir William Temple was the Envoy to Brussels from 1665 to 1667. He was also Lord Treasurer Thomas Osborne (later the Earl of Danby)'s Brother-in-Law.
Sir William Temple was created 1st Bart. on 31 Jan. 1666. He was strongly pro-Dutch, and was recognized as the principal architect of the Triple Alliance in 1668 (which may explain his words about negotiation and interest in the French).
http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1…

It's too early for Vauban to be building forts on the French-Flanders border, and he certainly wasn't a Marquess at the time. Perhaps Temple is referring to the French Envoy to Brussels? Any nominations?

About Saturday 20 October 1666

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

"He says that he heard Captain Digby (my Lord of Bristoll’s son, a young fellow that never was but one year, if that, in the fleete) say that he did hope he should not see a tarpaulin have the command of a ship within this twelve months."

I hope Pepys gets more facts before spreading this "information". Francis first went to sea at 15 in 1661. He volunteered with Lawson at the Battle of Lowestoft. He's a career-sensitive younger son of the Roman Catholic Ambassador to Spain who tried to block Charles II's marriage to Catherine of Braganza. Francis' opposition to tarpaulins may be more his immature way of reassuring everyone in earshot that he's not "suspect" like his father. The Navy is his career; he seems to have been good at it, and he served with / learned from the very best of the tarpaulins.

About Saturday 20 October 1666

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

"He says that he heard Captain Digby (my Lord of Bristoll’s son, a young fellow that never was but one year, if that, in the fleete) say that he did hope he should not see a tarpaulin have the command of a ship within this twelve months."

I hope Pepys gets more facts before spreading this "information". Francis first went to sea at 15 in 1661. He volunteered with Lawson at the Battle of Lowestoft. He's a career-sensitive younger son of the Roman Catholic Ambassador to Spain who tried to block Charles II's marriage to Catherine of Braganza. Francis' opposition to tarpaulins may be his way of reassuring everyone in earshot that he's not suspect like his father. The Navy is his career; he seems to have been good at it, and he served with / learned from the very best of the tarpaulins.

About Friday 19 October 1666

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

Sir Robert Vyner's "commissions" cont.:

Arlington to Ormonde
Written from: Whitehall
Date: 18 September 1666
Shelfmark: MS. Carte 46, fol(s). 371
Document type: Original; subscribed and signed

Notices the opening of Parliament; the calling up of Lord Ossory to the House of Lords; further advices received concerning the French fleet, under De Beaufort;
and a message from the Lord Chancellor concerning the making good of a sum of £3,300 which was deficient in a late remittance, made through Sir Robert Vyner, into Ireland.

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THERE ARE A COUPLE OF SPOILERS IN THE FOLLOWING, WHICH MAKE ME THINK SIR ROBERT KEPT HIS MARK-UP:
Anglesey to Ormonde
Written from: London
Date: 20 October 1666
Shelfmark: MS. Carte 217, fol(s). 344
Document type: Holograph

Has received the Duke's letters of October 2nd and 12th, with the enclosure, in the first of them, of Sir Robert Vyner's letter to Sir Daniel Bellingham "about the remainder of the £30,000".
From Bellingham he has also received a letter, in relation to his the writer's calculations of the Irish Revenue; calculations which the writer has no doubt of justifying; "except in such particulars as fail by accident". Adds other advices as to political and financial matters ...

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Anglesey to Ormonde
Written from: London
Date: 3 November 1666
Shelfmark: MS. Carte 217, fol(s). 350
Document type: Holograph [with seal of arms]

Sir Robert Vyner, being now Sheriff, is very hard to meet with, "but I shall be sure", ads the writer, "to dispatch your Grace's comments, the first business I do with him".

Lord Ossory was freed from the Tower on Wednesday [having been committed on the Monday, at the instance of the Duke of Buckingham, for breach of privilege of Parliament]. He has lost "no honour in the difference with Buckingham"; although, adds the writer, the course taken [to prevent a duel] was inevitable, the compaint being once made to the House.

Let the extremities [in Ireland] be what they may, no money will be gotten hence, until the fleet is fitted for sea. ...

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By October the threat of invasion had diminished, so what money there was now went to the fleet.