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San Diego Sarah has posted 1550 annotations/comments since 6 August 2015.

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About Saturday 19 August 1665

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

"to Charing-Cross, to the post-house," The White Hart by the Inner Spring Garden and opposite the royal mews.
(L&M note)

This is a different Spring Garden than the one Pepys usually goes to in Vauxhall.

One of the sights of London in the 17th century was the garden which lay between St. James's Park and Charing Cross, called Spring Gardens. The place was laid out as a bowling-green; it had also butts, a bathing-pond, a spring made to scatter water all around by turning a wheel. There was also an ordinary, which charged 6s. for a dinner — then an enormous price — and a tavern where drinking of wine was carried on all day long. In the "Character of England," 1659, attributed to Evelyn, the following account of Spring Gardens is found:

"The manner is as the company returned [from Hyde Park] to alight at the Spring Gardens so called, in order to the Park, as our Thuilleries is to the Course; the enclosure not disagreeable, for the solemness of the grove is broken by the warbling of the birds, as it opens into the spacious walks at St. James's; but the company walk in it at such a rate, you would think that all the ladies were so many Atalantas contending with their wooers. ... But fast as they run they stay there so long as if they wanted not time to finish the race; for it is usual here to find some of the young company until midnight; and the thickets of the garden seem to be contrived to all advantages of gallantry; after they have been refreshed with the collation, which is here seldom omitted, at a certain cabaret, in the middle of this paradise, where the forbidden fruits are certain trifling tarts, neats' tongues, salacious meats, and bad Rhenish; for which the gallants pay sauce, as indeed they do at all such houses throughout England."

This was 1659 -- the end if the Interregnum.

About Saturday 19 August 1665

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

My understanding of the debacle at Bergen is that, after the defeat, Thomas Clifford MP was put ashore at midnight disguised as a sailor, for a conversation with commandant Major Gen. Johan Caspar von Cicignon. The conversation was conducted in mixed Latin and French, but it went against the English, who were looking for a second chance.

A second chance to attack the VOC ships without Cicignon's troops firing back with cover? Does Montagu mention this risky adventure?

http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume... says: 'Having done as much as any man (except perhaps Sir George Downing) to start the war, Thomas Clifford MP did not personally shirk the consequences. He served as a volunteer in the naval campaign of 1665, ...'

Clifford was related by marriage to John Evelyn, and one of the Commissioner for the sick and wounded.

All it says in Wikipedia is that "Clifford distinguished himself in naval battles, and was knighted."

My admiration for my fellow Devonian increases. The Cliffords of Chudleigh were a hardy band of seafarers.

About Saturday 19 August 1665

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

Hanibal Sehested (a son-in-law of Frederick III of Denmark) must have been a charming man, because he got away with a lot. In early 1651 he was prosecuted for embezzlement by the Danish government, so from then until 1660 he lived abroad. At the end of 1655, Sehested met the exiled Charles II at Cologne and lived a part of the following year with him in the Spanish Netherlands. In the summer of 1657 Sehested returned to Denmark, but Frederick III refused to receive him, so he quickly left Copenhagen and by the crisis of the Second Northern War of 1658, Sehested was at the headquarters of Charles X of Sweden.

By seeking protection from his country’s worst enemy, Hanibal Sehested approached treason, but never quite committed it. When it seemed likely the war would not annihilate Denmark, Sehested secure his future by working in Denmark’s interests while staying in Sweden. In April 1660, Frederick III had invited him to Copenhagen to negotiate with the Swedes. The Treaty of Copenhagen, which saved Denmark’s honor, was largely Sehested's work.

Hanibal Sehested was one of the willing abettors of Frederick III in the revolution of 1660, when he re-entered the Danish service as lord treasurer and councilor of state.
He continued as a statesman and diplomat until his sudden death in Paris on 23 September 1666.

For more info see https://www.revolvy.com/page/Hannibal-Sehested-...

About Saturday 19 August 1665

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

Sir Gilbert Talbot had been posted to Venice from 1634-1645, and served as a gentleman usher of the privy chamber to Charles II during the Interregnum, during which he is credited with the idea for the Sealed Knot. He was a founding members of the Royal Society, but briefly resumed his diplomatic career as envoy to Denmark from 1664-1666 during the second Dutch war, although without conspicuous success, as he was accused of responsibility for the misunderstanding that caused the fiasco at Bergen. For more info see http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume...

About Cranbourne Lodge, Windsor Park

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

http://www.berkshirehistory.com/castles/cranbou...

"After the Restoration, Anne Hyde's father, the 1st Earl of Clarendon, had it as a retreat from public life. The diarist, Samuel Pepys, visited many times when his superior, Sir George Carteret, Treasurer of the Navy Board, was the Keeper in the 1660s. They would walk together in the Great Park discussing Navy business. Once his guide got lost on the way there and Pepys had to navigate by the moon. When he eventually arrived, the lodge was in the middle of being rebuilt. There was no way in and he had to ascend a ladder up to Carteret's bedroom and climb in at the window.

"John Evelyn tells us of a great dinner given for Charles II there in 1674.

"Lord Ranelagh, the Paymaster General of the Army, lived at the lodge in the 1690s. He amassed a huge fortune under rather dubious circumstances and spent much of it improving the park and gardens at Cranbourne, as well as founding Ranelagh School in Winkfield and now Bracknell. "

About Staines, Surrey

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

Brentford is about 10 miles from London, so it was the first staging post where coach horses were rested or changed before carrying on to Hounslow Heath, Staines, Windsor and Bath, ...

About Staines, Surrey

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

https://mercuriuspoliticus.wordpress.com/page/30/

Below are the steps John Taylor took on his journey to see King Charles in Newport:
19 October 1648. He took the Southampton coach from the Rose at Holborn Bridge. He went along St. Giles to Brentford and then on to Staines, where he stayed the night at the Bush Inn.
20 October 1648. John Taylor left Staines and went through Bagshot and Blackwater, before reaching Alton where he stayed in the White Hart. ... and on to Newport, Isle of Wight.

About Hounslow

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

Hounslow no longer exists as Pepys would have known it, as it's next to Heathrow airport, but there are echoes. Back then:

http://hidden-london.com/gazetteer/hounslow/

By 1635 Hounslow had already acquired significance as a coaching halt, conveniently located just before the Bath and Staines roads diverged across Hounslow Heath. Although the village barely extended beyond the High Street, there were over 100 residents and at least five inns, some of which had been in existence for more than a century. The separate village of Lampton lay to the north.
&&&

https://www.britannica.com/place/Hounslow

In the late 13th century a bridge was built across the River Brent, and Brentford grew as a market town in rural Middlesex.

During the English Civil Wars, Chiswick (on the present border between Ealing and Hounslow) was the site of the Battle of Turnham Green, which was fought at Brentford, Turnham Green, and Acton in 1642; as a result of the battle, the Parliamentarians blocked the advance of King Charles into London.

Hounslow Heath was a vast woodland extending over thousands of acres; the area was notorious for attacks by highwaymen.

Nearby estates include Syon House (1547–52), Boston Manor House (1623), and Osterley Park House (16th century) all of which are set in pleasant landscaped parkland. The present Chiswick House was built in Palladian-style by Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington. Syon House was the home of the dukes of Northumberland. The Gresham family had owned Osterley Park House in Isleworth, and the gardens are now a sizable public park. Other mansions include Gunnersbury Park Estate and Hogarth’s House (c. 1700), which displays prints of William Hogarth’s work.

About Saturday 19 August 1665

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

There were stables (mews) all over London. I continue to be surprised the Navy Office complex didn't include a small one with a few horses and a couple of coaches for the use of the staff. Having to borrow a horse from a vendor is not only embarrassing but compromising.