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Terry Foreman has posted 15257 annotations/comments since 28 June 2005.

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About Saturday 15 September 1666

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"Chupacabra in 17th-c. England?!"

The chupacabra or chupacabras, literally "goat-sucker"; from chupar, "to suck", and cabra, "goat") is a legendary creature in the folklore of parts of the Americas, with its first purported sightings reported in Puerto Rico. The name comes from the animal's reported habit of attacking and drinking the blood of livestock, including goats. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chupacabra

Don't think that is what is alleged to have been practised in Warwick in 1666.
Sheep tallow is a rendered (processed) form of mutton fat, so is not extracted as such from the animal. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tallow

About Tuesday 11 February 1667/68

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"to the Duke of York’s playhouse..., where I never saw such good acting of any creature as Smith’s part of Zanger; and I do also, though it was excellently acted by ————-, do yet want Betterton mightily."

L&M: Betterton usually played Solyman the Magnificant. William Smith, a tall, handsome actor, was a leading member of the company.

About Tuesday 11 February 1667/68

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"so to the Duke of York’s playhouse, and there saw the last act for nothing,"

L&M: Playgoers commonly claimed this privilege although it had been prohibited by the Lord Chamberlain on 7 December 1663.

About Sunday 9 February 1667/68

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"(By the way, I must remember that Pegg Pen was brought to bed yesterday of a girl; and, among other things, if I have not already set it down, that hardly ever was remembered such a season for the smallpox as these last two months have been, people being seen all up and down the streets, newly come out after the smallpox.)"

L&M: Cf. C. Creighton, Hist. epidemics in Britain, ii. 452-3. The Duke of York had had it in the previous November: CSPD 1667-8, e.g. p. 51.

About Sunday 9 February 1667/68

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"At noon home to dinner, where by appointment Mr. Pelling come and with him three friends, Wallington, that sings the good base, and one Rogers, and a gentleman, a young man, his name Tempest, who sings very well indeed, and understands anything in the world at first sight. "

L&M: For the singers, see https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1667/09/15/ and https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1667/09/15/#c547…
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Apparently apt sight-reading was unusual even in these circles.

About Friday 7 September 1666

Terry Foreman  •  Link

ORIGIN OF MANUSCRIPT
1590–1600; < Medieval Latin manūscrīptus written by hand, equivalent to Latin manū by hand (ablative of manus) + scrīptus written;
https://www.dictionary.com/browse/manuscript

A manuscript (abbreviated MS for singular and MSS for plural) was, traditionally, any document that is written by hand — or, once practical typewriters became available, typewritten — as opposed to being mechanically printed or reproduced in some indirect or automated way.[1] More recently, the term has come to be understood to further include any written, typed, or word-processed copy of an author's work, as distinguished from its rendition as a printed version of the same.[2] Before the arrival of printing, all documents and books were manuscripts. Manuscripts are not defined by their contents, which may combine writing with mathematical calculations, maps, explanatory figures or illustrations. Manuscripts may be in book form, scrolls or in codex format. Illuminated manuscripts are enriched with pictures, border decorations, elaborately embossed initial letters or full-page illustrations.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manuscript

About Friday 7 February 1667/68

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"So there parted, my mind pretty well satisfied with this plain fellow for my sister, though I shall, I see, have no pleasure nor content in him, as if he had been a man of reading and parts, like Cumberland,"

L&M: For Pepys's hopes of Richard Cumberland, see
https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1668/01/09/ and
https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1668/01/09/#c316…
Pepys found his brother-in-law incorrigibly improvident. He came to avoid direct dealings with him, preferring to correspond only with Paulins.