Annotations and comments

Terry Foreman has posted 16,404 annotations/comments since 28 June 2005.

The most recent first…

Comments

Third Reading

About Saturday 26 May 1660

Terry Foreman  •  Link

House of Lords - 5/26/1600

King's Goods, &c. that have been seized, to be delivered to Kynnesley.
https://www.british-history.ac.uk/lords-jrnl/vol1…

ORDERED, That Colonel Wm. Hawley and Colonel Hercules Lowe, who (having been authorized by the Lords Committees for receiving Information concerning the King's Goods, Jewels, &c. to seize and secure such Goods and other Moveables belonging to the Crown as they should find to be concealed) have accordingly seized and secured sundry Goods belonging to the Crown, be, and are hereby, authorized and required to deliver to Mr. Kynnersley such of the said Goods now in their Custody as shall be of present Use for the Furnishing of His Majesty's Court at Whitehall.

Kem to deliver a Canopy of State to him.
Whereas Mr. Henry Kem of Westm. hath in his Custody a Canopy of State belonging to the Crown, for which he hath really paid the Sum of Thirty Pounds, which Canopy of State is of present Use, for the furnishing His Majesty's Prefence Chamber, in His Court at Whitehall:

It is ORDERED, That Mr. Kynnersley do require and receive the said Canopy of State of Mr. Kem aforesaid, giving him his Receipt for the same, to the End the said Mr. Kem may be hereafter further satisfied.

Adjourn.
House adjourned till 5a post meridiem.

About Saturday 26 May 1660

Terry Foreman  •  Link

House of Commons - 5/26/1660

Irish Rebellion.
https://www.british-history.ac.uk/commons-jrnl/vo…

A Message from the Lords, by Doctor Child, Mr. *, Two Masters of Chancery;

Mr. Speaker, The Lords desire a present Conference with this House about the Declaration, received this Morning, concerning the Rebellion of Ireland, in the Painted Chamber.

Resolved, That a Conference be presently had with the Lords upon the said Declaration: And that Mr. Finch, Sir John Temple, Mr. Annesley, Sir Anth. Irby, Lord Aungier, Col. Shapcott, Sir Edward Deering, be a Committee to manage this Conference.

The Messengers were again called in; and Mr. Speaker gave them this Answer;

The House hath considered of your Message; and they do agree to a Conference, as is desired, in the Painted Chamber.

About Saturday 26 May 1660

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Meanwhile in the House of Lords in Westminster - 5/26/1660

Message from H. C. with a Declaration for suppressing Troubles in Ireland.

https://www.british-history.ac.uk/lords-jrnl/vol1…
A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by the Lord Angier; who brought up a Declaration for suppressing some Troubles in the Kingdom of Ireland, wherein they desire their Lordships Concurrence.

Read Twice.

The Answer returned was:

Answer.
That this House will return an Answer by Messengers of their own.

Committee for preparing a Proclamation against the Rebels in Ireland.
ORDERED, That a Proclamation be drawn up, to be sent to His Majesty, by the Advice of both Houses, to be issued in His Majesty's Name, to the same Effect.

And these Lords following were appointed to prepare the same, and report it to the House:

1 Comes Northumb.
6 Comes Portland.
2 Comes Bridgwater.
3 Comes Leycester.
4 Comes Denbigh.
5 Comes Berks. 7 Viscount Say & Seale.
1 Ds. Willoughby.
2 Ds. Paget.
3 Ds. Robertes.
Justice Malet to assist.

About Saturday 26 May 1660

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Thorstein Veblen, The Theory of the Leisure Class

Chapter Six ~~ Pecuniary Canons of Taste
The caution has already been repeated more than once, that while the regulating norm of consumption is in large part the requirement of conspicuous waste, it must not be understood that the motive on which the consumer acts in any given case is this principle in its bald, unsophisticated form. Ordinarily his motive is a wish to conform to established usage, to avoid unfavorable notice and comment, to live up to the accepted canons of decency in the kind, amount, and grade of goods consumed, as well as in the decorous employment of his time and effort. In the common run of cases this sense of prescriptive usage is present in the motives of the consumer and exerts a direct constraining force, especially as regards consumption carried on under the eyes of observers. But a considerable element of prescriptive expensiveness is observable also in consumption that does not in any appreciable degree become known to outsiders—as, for instance, articles of underclothing, some articles of food, kitchen utensils, and other household apparatus designed for service rather than for evidence. In all such useful articles a close scrutiny will discover certain features which add to the cost and enhance the commercial value of the goods in question, but do not proportionately increase the serviceability of these articles for the material purposes which alone they ostensibly are designed to serve.

https://www.gutenberg.org/files/833/833-h/833-h.h…
[ scroll down for the paragraph on the dog]

About Royal Charles (was Naseby)

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Bryan on 1 Apr 2013 • Link • Flag
These diagrams are from A Ship of War, Cyclopaedia, 1728, Even though they were drawn nearly 70 years later I think they give a good idea of the ships Sam is sailing in.

The top diagram represents a third rate ship of the line, such as the Swiftsure (42 guns) in which Sam is currently sailing.

The Naseby (80 guns) is a first rate ship of the line similar to the lower diagram. Notice that the State Room (S) and the Ward Room (T) both have cannons in them. From the legend: "The State Room out of which the Bed Chamber and other Con...(illegible) for the Commander in Chief"; "The Ward Room. Allotted for Voluntier(?) and Land Officers".

Spoiler

There is also The Cuddy (R) just below the Poop Deck (P) "which is commonly divided for the Masters and Secretaries Officers". Would this be where our favorite secretary finds lodging?

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/th…

About The Swiftsure

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Bryan on 1 Apr 2013 • Link • Flag
These diagrams are from A Ship of War, Cyclopaedia, 1728, Even though they were drawn nearly 70 years later I think they give a good idea of the ships Sam is sailing in.

The top diagram represents a third rate ship of the line, such as the Swiftsure (42 guns) in which Sam is currently sailing.

The Naseby (80 guns) is a first rate ship of the line similar to the lower diagram. Notice that the State Room (S) and the Ward Room (T) both have cannons in them. From the legend: "The State Room out of which the Bed Chamber and other Con...(illegible) for the Commander in Chief"; "The Ward Room. Allotted for Voluntier(?) and Land Officers".

Spoiler

There is also The Cuddy (R) just below the Poop Deck (P) "which is commonly divided for the Masters and Secretaries Officers". Would this be where our favorite secretary finds lodging?

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/th…

About Thursday 24 May 1660

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Meanwhile in the House of Lords -- 5/24/1660

https://www.british-history.ac.uk/lords-jrnl/vol1…

Letter to the King, to congratulate His safe Landing, &c.

ORDERED, That these Lords following are appointed, to draw up a Letter to be sent to His Majesty, to express the great Sense of this House for His Majesty's safe Landing; to know His Pleasure, both for Time and Place, where this House may wait upon Him; and desire Him to consult His own Safety, for the Manner of His Return:

Comes Northumb.
Comes South'ton.
Comes Bridgwater.
Comes Denbigh.
Ds. Robertes.
Ds. Seymour.

About Wednesday 23 May 1660

Terry Foreman  •  Link

House of Lords -- 5/23/1600

https://www.british-history.ac.uk/lords-jrnl/vol1…

Letter from the Lords who went to wait on the King.

"My Lord,"
We have delivered the Letter and Message intrusted to us by the House of Peers, and found a most gracious Reception from His Majesty, who is pleased to declare (which we desire your Lordship to communicate to the House), That He intends to part from hence on Monday next, being the 21th of this Month, to land at Dover; and, after a short Stay at Canterbury, to continue His Journey to London, and there to reside with His Court at Whitehall.
This we are commanded to impart to your Lordship from His Majesty, and remain"Your Lordship'sHagh, the 17th May, 1660.
Most humble Servants,
Oxford.
Middlesex.
Vis. Hereford.
Berkeley.
Brooke.
To the Right Honourable the Earl of Manchester, Speaker of the House of Peers."

....https://www.british-history.ac.uk/lords-jrnl/vol11/pp38-39#h3-0008

King's Reception.
https://www.british-history.ac.uk/lords-jrnl/vol1…

ORDERED, That the Committee for the King's Reception do meet this Afternoon; and to consider what is fit for the present to be done, to receive His Majesty.

About Wednesday 23 May 1660

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Meanwhile in Parliament in England

House of Commons -- 5/23/1600

https://www.british-history.ac.uk/commons-jrnl/vo…

The King's Accommodation.

Mr. Annesly, Lord President, reports from the Council of State, an Estimate of the Charge of several Particulars, necessary to be provided for the Accommodating of his Majesty, and the Dukes of Yorke and Gloucester; viz.
An ESTIMATE of the Charge of making up of a rich Cloth of State, with a Chair, Three Stools, and Two Cushions, out of an old Canopy of State, and some imperfect Furniture of a Crimson Velvet Bed suitable, £.s.d. Will amount unto the Sum of about 200--
For repairing of an old Chair of State, with Three Stools suitable to it20--
For repairing, with some Additions, of the rich incarnate Velvet Bed, being for the Reception of his Majesty, before the other can be made10--
For a Counterpoint to it, which will contain Thirty Yards of Cloth of Silver, lined with Bays and Taffaty Sarsenet46--
Three Pair of Fine Fustian Blankets1610-For Twelve new Fustian and Holland Quilts for his Majesty's incarnate Velvet Bed, and the Two Dukes Beds48--
For Three Pair of the best Spanish Blankets for those Beds12--For Three large fine round Down Bolsters9--For Three necessary Stools of Velvet for those Beds30--For Three French Tables for those Beds318-For Thirty Pallet Beds, of the largest Size, for the two Dukes; Thirty Tapestry Counterpoints, and Thirty Pair of Blankets630--
Twelve Pair of Fine Holland Sheets for the Dukes of Yorke and Gloucester own Beds17216-
For Making and Washing these Twelve Pair of Sheets612-
For Sixty Pair of Sheets, for Thirty Pallet Beds aforesaid, will cost26710-
For Making and Washing these Sixty Pair of Sheets6--
For Twelve Pounds of sweet Powder to put to the whole Provision of Sheets3--
For Ten Damask Curtains, containing 240 Yards of Damask, and lined with Fustian, and Making, with Rings and Tape to them240--Total £.1,7216-
Which was read and approved of. Ordered, That it be referred to the Council of State, to take care, that the same be provided accordingly.

About Tuesday 22 May 1660

Terry Foreman  •  Link

House of Commons today 5/22/1660

Leave to attend the King.
Ordered, That the Lord General Moncke have the Leave of this House to go and attend his Majesty at his Landing, at such Time as he shall please: And that the like Leave be given to such other Members of this House, as he shall desire to accompany him.

House of Lords today 5/22/1660

Lords Leave to meet the King.
D. Bucks,
E. Newport,
E. Peterburgh, have Leave to go and meet His Majesty for a few Days.
E. Rivers, Viscount Conway,
L. Maynard,
E. of Shrewsbury,
E. Lyndsey, hath Leave to attend His Majesty for a few Days, and will return to attend this House with their Lordships.

About Friday 18 May 1660

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Knot garden

A knot garden is a garden of formal design in a square frame, consisting of a variety of aromatic plants and culinary herbs including germander, marjoram, thyme, southernwood, lemon balm, hyssop, costmary, acanthus, mallow, chamomile, rosemary, Calendula, Viola and Santolina. Most knot gardens now have edges made from box (Buxus sempervirens), which is easily cut into desired shapes, like dense miniature hedges, and stays green during winters when not all of the "filling" plants are visible or attractive. The paths in between are usually laid with fine gravel. However, the original designs of knot gardens did not have the low box hedges, and knot gardens with such hedges might more accurately be called parterres.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knot_garden

A parterre is a part of a formal garden constructed on a level substrate, consisting of symmetrical patterns, made up by plant beds, low hedges or coloured gravels, which are separated and connected by paths. Typically it was the part of the garden nearest the house, perhaps after a terrace.[1] The view of it from inside the house, especially from the upper floors, was a major consideration in its design. The word "parterre" was and is used both for the whole part of the garden containing parterres and for each individual section between the "alleys". https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parterre

About Saturday 5 May 1660

Terry Foreman  •  Link

An echo from Commons this day:

Saturday, May 5th, 1660.
Prayers.
Continuing Parliament.
A BILL ingrossed, for continuing this present Parliament, was, this Day, read the Third time.

Resolved, That this be the Title of the Bill, viz. An Act for removing and preventing all Questions and Disputes, concerning the Assembling and Sitting of this present Parliament:

And the said Bill, being put to the Question, passed.

Ordered, That Mr. Finch do carry up this Bill to the Lords.

Deferring Easter Term.
Mr. Francis Bacon reports a Declaration, concerning the putting off some Part of the next Easter Term, until Quinque Pasche; which was read, and committed unto Serjeant Hales, Sir Tho. Widdrington, Mr. Weston, Serjeant Glyn, Mr. Pryn, Mr. Turner, Mr. Charleton, Mr. Francis Bacon; who are presently to withdraw, and amend the said Declaration upon the Debate had in the House. https://www.british-history.ac.uk/commons-jrnl/vo…

About Wednesday 2 May 1660

Terry Foreman  •  Link

I posted: "The City of London have put a Declaration, wherein they do disclaim their owing any other government but that of a King, Lords, and Commons."

"Fortunately this Declaration is now an Early English Book Online; unfortunately its text is not [yet] freely available to be browsed (go to a library):

ACTUALLY this link DOES GO TO THE TEXT: http://quod.lib.umich.edu/e/eebo2/A82068.0001.001…

About Monday 30 April 1660

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Why do Pepys and his entourage want to go see Captain Thomas Sparling?

A chance to get away from the ship for awhile? -- whatever the quality of the sights where he is?! There have been others onshore, why Sparling? Did he invite them? What was his connegshion?