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Terry Foreman has posted 13301 annotations/comments since 28 June 2005.

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About Sunday 4 August 1661

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"Roger Pepys — (who I find a very sober man, and one whom I do now honour more than ever before for this discourse sake only) told me how basely things have been carried in Parliament by the young men, that did labour to oppose all things that were moved by serious men. "

The first session of the new parliament, ending on 30th July, had seen many victories for cavalier (for 'young men's') interests over that of the Presbyterians, or 'serious men'. Robert, son of Talbot Pepys, was M.P, for Cambridge borough. (L&M note)

About Sunday 4 August 1661

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"To church, and had a good plain sermon, and my uncle Talbot went with us"

L&M note Talbot Pepys, lord of the manor, was Pepys's great-uncle. The church (St Andrews) lay a short distance to the north of the house. The parson was probably T. Bradshaw, who served the cure for the non-resident Vicar, Thomas Wilborogh.

About Saturday 3 August 1661

Terry Foreman  •  Link

" hey tell me how high the old doctors are in the University over those they found there, though a great deal better scholars than themselves; for which I am very sorry, and, above all, Dr. Gunning."

Peter Gunning, elecyted Haster of St John's in June 1664, was quick to 'rour out the old leaven', accorting to Thomas Baker (d. 1740). But he is said to have allowed 'a vert considerable annuity' to Anthony Tuckmey, whom he replaced both in the mastership and as professor: Wood, Ath. Oxon. (ed Bliss), iv . 143. (L&M note)

About Saturday 3 August 1661

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"the old doctors are in the University over those they found there, though a great deal better scholars than themselves"

L&M weigh in: John Peachell and Clement Sankey had been elected to their fellowships at Magdalene during the Protectorate. They probably feared the power of the dispossessed heads of houses and fellows who were now restored to the places from which they had been extruded during the revolution.

About Thursday 6 October 1664

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"Prince Rupert is fallen into Lee Road."

San Diego Sarah posts:

Seriously, I have Googled and searched this encyclopedia section without success: I'm guessing the 'road' in this case is a protected holding spot for ships off Lee. Lee Essex, Lee Kent and Lee Sussex all seem to be people with exhaustive Facebook profiles. Given the time frame, Lee must be at the mouth of the Thames.

Anyone got any ideas?

It seems to be Lee Road, Kent (or was during the Commonwealth): https://books.google.com/books?id=MVg4AQAAMAAJ&...

About Wednesday 5 October 1664

Terry Foreman  •  Link

" the Prince under sail the next tide after, and so is gone from the Hope
. God give him better successe than he used to have!""

L&M: Rupert had had indifferent success as a naval commander, 1648-52. He now led a small squadron intended for W. Africa, but got no farther than Spithead, where the fleet was enlarged and reformed under the Duke of York. It then cruised in the Channel for a few weeks: https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1664/10/03/ and https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1664/10/03/#c5...

About Tuesday 4 October 1664

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"a new play, called “The Parson’s Dreame,” acted all by women."

Thomas Killigrew's exceptionally bawdy comedy. The Parson's Wedding, was was written in 1640 and published in 1664: see https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1664/10/11/ This is the first reference to a post-Restoration performance. The exploitation of actresses in highly suggestive roles was common at the time. (L&M note)

About Monday 3 October 1664

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"Mr. Bland came this night to me to take his leave of me, he going to Tangier"

John Bland went as a merchant; he served as the first mayor in 1668-9, and later became Comptroller of His Majesty's Revenues there. (L&M note)

About Monday 3 October 1664

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"down to Deptford, where I found Mr. Coventry, and there we made, an experiment of Holland’s and our cordage, and ours outdid it a great deale, as my book of observations tells particularly."

NWB, p. 16 (3 October). Coventry was bot too pleased, since he had been instrumental in buying Dutch cordage. (L&M note)