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Terry Foreman has posted 15,686 annotations/comments since 28 June 2005.

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About Tuesday 14 April 1663

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Napier didn't produce a calculating device using his logarithm, but, long before the slide rule, he published Napier's bones:

Napier's bones is a manually-operated calculating device created by John Napier of Merchiston, Scotland for the calculation of products and quotients of numbers. The method was based on lattice multiplication, and was also called 'rabdology', a word invented by Napier himself. Napier published his version in 1617 in Rabdologiæ[1], printed in Edinburgh, Scotland, dedicated to his patron Alexander Seton.

Using the multiplication tables embedded in the rods, multiplication can be reduced to addition operations and division to subtractions. More advanced use of the rods can even extract square roots. Napier's bones are not the same as logarithms, with which Napier's name is also associated, but are based on dissected multiplication tables.

The complete device usually includes a base board with a rim; the user places Napier's rods inside the rim to conduct multiplication or division. The board's left edge is divided into 9 squares, holding the numbers 1 to 9. In Napier's original design, the rods are made of metal, wood or ivory and have a square cross-section. Each rod is engraved with a multiplication table on each of the four faces. In some later designs, the rods may be flat and have two tables or only one table engraved on them, and may be made of plastic or heavy cardboard. A set of such bones might be enclosed in a convenient carrying case.

1 Multiplication
1.1 Example 1 – multiplication by a small single-digit number
1.2 Example 2 – multiplication by a larger single-digit number
1.3 Example 3 – multiplication by a multi-digit number
2 Division
3 Extracting square roots
3.1 Rounding up
4 Diagonal modification
5 Genaille–Lucas rulers
https://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/11639/

About Tuesday 9 February 1668/69

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"saw “The Island Princesse,” which I like mighty well, as an excellent play: and here we find Kinaston to be well enough to act again,

L&M: According to Genest (i. 93), Kynaston played the King of Tidore) '

About Monday 8 February 1668/69

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"This morning also, going to visit Roger Pepys, at the potticary’s in King’s Street, he tells me that Roger is gone to his wife’s, so that they have been married, as he tells me, ever since the middle of last week: it was his design, upon good reasons, to make no noise of it; but I am well enough contented that it is over."

L&M: Esther Dickenson, https://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/13169/
She was his fourth wife.

About Monday 8 February 1668/69

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"This day I was told by Mr. Wren, that Captain Cox, Master- Attendant at Deptford, is to be one of us very soon, he and Tippets being to take their turns for Chatham and Portsmouth, which choice I like well enough; and Captain Annesley is to come in his room at Deptford."

L&M: John Cox was made Commissioner at Chatham on 20 March 1669. John Tippets had served in the same office at Portsmouth since February 1668. Abraham Ansley had been Cox's deputy at Deptford.

About Monday 8 February 1668/69

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"the state of my Lord’s accounts of his embassy, which I find not so good as I thought: for, though it be passed the King and his [Cabinet]... , yet they have cut off from 9000l. full 8000l., and have now sent it to the Lords of the Treasury, who, though the Committee have allowed the rest, yet they are not obliged to abide by it."

L&M: The Treasury quickly confirmed the lower figure: CTB, iii. 22-4. For the subsequent disputes, see Harris, ii. 162-5. For a summary of the accounts, see CSPD 168-9, pp. 54, 191-3, 454. In August 1669 Sandwich agreed to the reductions, and the accounts passed. The A Foreign Affairs,Committee cut down his weekly allowance from £133 to £100, and agreed to pay £4000 (instead of £6000) for travelling and other costs.

About Monday 8 February 1668/69

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"Here I met with Mr. Moore, who tells me the state of my Lord’s accounts of his embassy, which I find not so good as I thought: for, though it be passed the King and his Cabal (the Committee for Foreign Affairs as they are called),"

L&M: A Committee for Foreign Affairs, nine in number, had been constituted in February 1668, an d served as a Cabinet.

About Wednesday 26 June 1667

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Thanks, Gerald Berg.

"As Time Goes By" is a song written by Herman Hupfeld in 1931. It became famous when it was featured in the 1942 Warner Bros. film Casablanca performed by Dooley Wilson as Sam. The song was voted No. 2 on the AFI's 100 Years...100 Songs special, commemorating the best songs in film[1] (only surpassed by "Over the Rainbow" by Judy Garland). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/As_Time_Goes_By_(so…

About Sunday 7 February 1668/69

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"It was, that she did believe me false to her with Jane, and did rip up three or four silly circumstances of her not rising till I come out of my chamber, and her letting me thereby see her dressing herself; and that I must needs go into her chamber and was naught with her; which was so silly, and so far from truth, that I could not be troubled at it, though I could not wonder at her being troubled, if she had these thoughts, and therefore she would lie from me, and caused sheets to be put on in the blue room, and would have Jane to lie with her lest I should come to her [Jane]."

This is the bed Pepys has made, and now must lie in.

About Henry Wynne

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Henry Wynne, mathematical-instrument maker, at the Pope's Head, Chancery Lane: see Eva G.R. Taylor, Math. Practitioners, pp. 242-3.

About Wednesday 3 February 1668/69

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"I may be able to do a great deal of business by dictating, if I do not read myself, or write"

I take it Pepys -- ever alert to inefficiencies -- had usually paused in his dictation to proof-read the results and then correct the text by writing it right.

About Wednesday 3 February 1668/69

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Jesse posts: "I wonder if shorthand was a standard skill for clerks and office types. At the used bookstore I volunteer at we occasionally get donations of Gregg shorthand manuals."

Since the Diary tells up Hewer and Sir W. Coventry also used the shorthand Pepys did, one wonders how many used copies of the several editions of Shelton's Tachygraphy were to be found in London bookstores.
https://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/2428/#c12…

About Monday 1 February 1668/69

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"I must confess, I do think it is not altogether so beautiful as the oyle pictures"

L&M: The use of tempera *'distemper') -- a medieval practice -- was now being revived under the sponsorship of the Royal Society: Edward Croft-Murray, Decorative painting in England, 1537-1837, i. 276. I consisted of egg mixed with shredded figleaves, and enabled paint to dry quickly and several degrees lighter in tone than the wet pigment.

About Review: "The Closet" by Danielle Bobker

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Amen to that!!

------------
I.a. Sue Nicholson introduced me to "enfilade" – architect’s glossary:

“Enfilade” is an architectural term used to define a long spatial axis usually made up of a series of openings between rooms that all align.

The term has its origins in military usage – an enfilade is a way of describing an enemies exposure to being fired upon.  Firing down along the length of a trench, as opposed to perpendicularly to its “front”, is the genesis of the term enfilade. https://mgerwing.wordpress.com/2010/11/27/enfilad…