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About Friday 15 May 1663

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"Strange were the effects of the late thunder and lightning about a week since at Northampton, coming with great rain, which caused extraordinary floods in a few hours, bearing away bridges, drowning horses, men, and cattle. Two men passing over a bridge on horseback, the arches before and behind them were borne away, and that left which they were upon: but, however, one of the horses fell over, and was drowned. Stacks of faggots carried as high as a steeple, and other dreadful things; which Sir Thomas Crew showed me letters to him about from Mr. Freemantle and others, that it is very true."

L&M: The storm occurred on 6 May: both the west bridge and the south bridge were badly damaged. . . . The Crews' country house was near Brackley, Northanta. . . .

About Friday 15 May 1663

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"I hear, the Bishopp of London keeps as great with the King as ever) is got into favour, so much that, being a man of great business and yet of pleasure, and drolling too, he, it is thought, will be made Lord Treasurer upon the death or removal of the good old man."

L&M: This is contrary to Clarendon's view (recoded in 1671-2) that Ashley by now had 'got no ground': Life, ii. 351. Southampton was 55, and ill with gout and the stone. Rumours of his resignation or dismissal were current throughout 1662-4, partly because he had delegated most of his work to his secretary, Sir Philip Warwick. Cf. https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1663/08/05/ The French ambassador, de Cominges noted the rising reputation of Ashley as Chancellor of the Exchequer, in a dispatch of 30 March/9 April: PRO, PRO 3 1/3, no. iii, f. 91r. But Southampton retained office until his death in 1667.

About Friday 15 May 1663

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"But strange to hear how my Lord Ashley, by my Lord Bristol’s means (he being brought over to the Catholique party against the Bishopps, whom he hates to the death, and publicly rails against them; not that he is become a Catholique, but merely opposes the Bishopps; and yet, for aught I hear, the Bishopp of London"

L&M: Gilbert Sheldon. The bishops (together with Clarendon and Southampton,the Lord Treasurer) had been out of favour with the King since February, when they had opposed an indulgence bill for the relief of Catholics which both Buckingham and Ashley had supported. 'From that time, Clarendon wrote,' the King never treated any of them [the bishops] with that respect as he had done formerly, and often spake of them too slightly; which easily encouraged others not only to mention their persons very negligently, but their function and religion itself': Life, ii. 351. It is possible that Ashley had been sarcastic at the expense of the bishops in the debate (8 May) on the fees they paid in translation: LJ, xi. 519.

About Friday 15 May 1663

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"And I do believe that my Lord do find some other things go against his mind in the House; for in the motion made the other day in the House by my Lord Bruce, that none be capable of employment but such as have been loyal and constant to the King and Church, the General [Monk] and my Lord were mentioned to be excepted;"

L&M: Bruce had moved the order for drafting of this (abortive) bill. See https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1663/05/05/ and https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1663/05/05/#c457…
The Commons Journals (having no information about proceedings in committee) do not report the proposal to make exceptions for Sandwich and Albemarle. But they were exempted under another bill (also abortive) which aimed at cancelling the grant of certain Crown lands: CJ, viii. 487.

About Wednesday 29 April 1663

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"I offered him [Sandwich] a way of evading the greatest part of his debt honestly, by making himself debtor to the Parliament, before the King’s time, which he might justly do, yet he resolved to go openly and nakedly in it, and put himself to the kindness of the King and Duke,"

L&M: He owed £1200: https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1663/04/11/ The restored monarchy honored the debts owed by the revolutionary governments. The Duke's orders for the making out of bills on Sandwich's accounts were issues on 29 and 30 May: BL, Add. 9314, f. 5r. For the payments, see PRO, Adm. 20/4, pp. 248-9, 251.

About Saturday 25 April 1663

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"So in the evening home, and after supper (my father at my brother’s) and merrily practising to dance, which my wife hath begun to learn this day of Mr. Pembleton, but I fear will hardly do any great good at it, because she is conceited that she do well already, though I think no such thing."

L&M: The lessons continued until the following 27 May.

About Friday 10 April 1663

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"Off the Exchange with Sir J. Cutler and Mr. Grant to the Royall Oak Tavern, in Lumbard Street
Lombard Street
Running from the junction with Poultry, Threadneedle Street and Cornhill south-west to meet Gracechurch Street. It was a piece of land granted by King Edward I to goldsmiths from a part of Northern Italy known as Lombardy.
, where Alexander Broome the poet was, a merry and witty man, I believe, if he be not a little conceited,"

L&M: Aubrey (i. 126) records that he had been a precocious scholar, 'in his accedence [Latin grammar] at four years old and a quarter'. He was a writer of lyrics and epigrams, an anthologist and a dramatist .

About Friday 27 March 1663

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"to a tavern, and there paid my uncle Wight three pieces of gold for himself, my aunt, and their son that is dead, left by my uncle Robert,"

L&M: The Wights had been left 20s. each to buy rings.

About Tuesday 17 March 1662/63

Terry Foreman  •  Link

More for the hyper=curious

Oyer and terminer
In English law, oyer and terminer (/ˈɔɪ.ər ... ˈtɜːrmɪnər/; a partial translation of the Anglo-French oyer et terminer, which literally means "to hear and to determine"[1]) was the Law French name for one of the commissions by which a judge of assize sat. The commission was also known by the Law Latin name audiendo et terminando, and the Old English-derived term soc and sac.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oyer_and_terminer

About Friday 13 March 1662/63

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"At noon home to dinner...and...there came in Captain Grove, and I found him to be a very stout man, at least in his discourse he would be thought so, and I do think that he is, and one that bears me great respect and deserves to be encouraged for his care in all business."

L&M: Edward Grove, naval captain, acted as a river agent for the Navy Board -- an efficient onw, but fussy and boastful, to judge by his correspondence. On 21 February last, he had impressed Pepys by his willingness to defend the Board against the Exchequer's bailiffs. In 1665 he was guilty of cowardice during te Battle if Lowestoft, when Pepys write him off as a 'prating coxcomb...of no courage': https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1665/06/16/ In 1664 Pepys had considered him as a possible husband for his sister Paulina: https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1664/02/09/

About Thursday 12 March 1662/63

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"I to the office, where at the choice of maisters and chyrurgeons for the fleet now going out,"

L&M: This squadron sailed to Portugal and the Mediterranean in early May, more than a month later than expected: PRO, Adm. 106/7, no. 199; HMC, Heathcote, pp. 65-6, 80; CSPD 1663-4, p. 130.

About George Jolliffe

Terry Foreman  •  Link

George Joliffe

He had had attended Pepys after his operation for the stone in 1658 and had died shortly afterwards at an early age. (L&M fn. 2/27/1663)

About Monday 23 February 1662/63

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"But it being my birthday and my day of liberty regained to me, and lastly, the last play that is likely to be acted at Court before Easter, because of the Lent coming in, I was the easier content to fling away so much money."

L&M: I.e. on the visit to the LIF. It was not until 1675 that the King allowed a company to charge fir admission to a court performance at Whitehall --- much to Evelyn's disgust (29 September): E. Boswell, Restoration Court Stage, p. 121.