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Terry Foreman has posted 13734 annotations/comments since 28 June 2005.

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About Monday 10 July 1665

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"to Richmond, and there, by night, walked with him to Moreclacke, a very pretty walk, and there staid a good while"

Sc. at an inn, which may have been the White Hart, Mortlake (built 1662), or one on the site of the present Ship Hotel. (L&M note)

About Monday 10 July 1665

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"having a coach of Mr. Povy’s attending me, by appointment, in order to my coming to dine at his country house at Brainford,"

The Priory, Hounslow, near Branford, Mdx. Thomas Povey's father, Justinian, Auditor of the Exchequer, had bought it in 1625; he sold it in 1671.: D. Lysons, Environs of London (1792-1811), ii. 38. (L&M note)

About Monday 10 July 1665

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"Anon I took my leave, and away by water to the Duke of Albemarle’s, where he tells me that I must be at Hampton Court anon. "

Thew court had gone there on the 9th. (L&M note)

About Sunday 9 July 1665

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"The most observable thing I found there to my content, was to hear him and his clerk tell me that in this parish of Michell’s, Cornhill, one of the middlemost parishes and a great one of the towne, there hath, notwithstanding this sickliness, been buried of any disease, man, woman, or child, not one for thirteen months last past; which [is] very strange."

There had been several burials, presumably from natural causes: GL, a.1.5. no. 96. The clerk in 1662 was Daniel Hinson: GL, MS.10942/1. (L&M note)

About Thursday 6 July 1665

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"by coach to several places, among others to see my Lord Brunkerd, who is not well, but was at rest when I come. I could not see him, nor had much mind, one of the great houses within two doors of him being shut up"

Brouncker lived in the Piazza, Covent Garden. (L&M note)

About Tuesday 4 July 1665

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"It seems this De Witt and another family, the Beckarts, were among the chief of the familys that were enemys to the Prince, and were afterwards suppressed by the Prince, and continued so till he was, as they say, poysoned; and then they turned all again, as it was, against the young Prince, and have so carried it to this day, it being about 12 and 14 years, and De Witt in the head of them."

William II died at the age of 24 on 25 October/6 November 1650 of a fever caught after hunting. His death came so opportunely for the States party that these rumours of his having been poisoned were quickly put about. His son was not born until a week later. (L&M note)

About Tuesday 4 July 1665

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"Bankert, it seems, is come home with the little fleete he hath been abroad with, without doing any thing, so that there is nobody of an enemy at sea. "

According to a report from The Hague, Bankert re-entered the Texel on 28 June/8 July 'because he did not know what to do, not having met a single Englishman at sea':CSPVen. 1664-6, p. 166. See https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1665/06/20/

About Saturday 1 July 1665

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Buoy of the Nore

The Nore is a sandbank at the mouth of the Thames Estuary, England. It marks the point where the River Thames meets the North Sea, roughly halfway between Havengore Creek in Essex and Warden Point on the Isle of Sheppey in Kent.

Until 1964 it marked the seaward limit of the Port of London Authority. As the sandbank was a major hazard for shipping coming in and out of London, in 1732 it received the world's first lightship. This became a major landmark, and was used as an assembly point for shipping. Today it is marked by Sea Reach No. 1 Buoy. https://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/8827/