Friday 8 May 1668

Up, and to the office, where busy all the morning. Towards noon I to Westminster and there understand that the Lords’ House did sit till eleven o’clock last night, about the business in difference between them and the Commons, in the matter of the East India Company. Here took a turn or two, and up to my Lord Crew’s, and there dined; where Mr. Case, the minister, a dull fellow in his talk, and all in the Presbyterian manner; a great deal of noise and a kind of religious tone, but very dull. After dinner my Lord and I together. He tells me he hears that there are great disputes like to be at Court, between the factions of the two women, my Lady Castlemayne and Mrs. Stewart, who is now well again, and the King hath made several public visits to her, and like to come to Court: the other is to go to Barkeshire-house, which is taken for her, and they say a Privy-Seal is passed for 5000l. for it. He believes all will come to ruin. Thence I to White Hall, where the Duke of York gone to the Lords’ House, where there is to be a conference on the Lords’ side to the Commons this afternoon, giving in their Reasons, which I would have been at, but could not; for, going by direction to the Prince’s chamber, there Brouncker, W. Pen, and Mr. Wren, and I, met, and did our business with the Duke of York. But, Lord! to see how this play of Sir Positive At-all, —[“The Impertinents.”]— in abuse of Sir Robert Howard, do take, all the Duke’s and every body’s talk being of that, and telling more stories of him, of the like nature, that it is now the town and country talk, and, they say, is most exactly true. The Duke of York himself said that of his playing at trap-ball is true, and told several other stories of him. This being done, Brouncker, Pen, and I to Brouncker’s house, and there sat and talked, I asking many questions in mathematics to my Lord, which he do me the pleasure to satisfy me in, and here we drank and so spent an hour, and so W. Pen and I home, and after being with W. Pen at his house an hour, I home and to bed.

8 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"The Duke of York himself said that of his playing at trap-ball is true,"

L&M note that Howard was represented in Act III of "The Impertinents" as so 'eminent' at trap-ball as to offer to play it for s £500 wager. The Duke of York was his political enemy.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"the matter of the East India Company"

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?co...

Geoff Hallett   Link to this

I have just caught the second half of Composer of the Week on BBC Radio 3, 12 noon. It is Henry Purcell this week. Today, Before the 'Glorious' Revolution. It gave a great 'feel' to the music of the time and the kind of thing Sam would have been listening to. Do we know of any references to Purcell in the Diaries?. He died so young when Sam was about 63. Looking forward to the next four. Tomorrow, music he composed while William was on the throne.

jeannine   Link to this

"King Charles and his Ladies" a new dice game!

"there are great disputes like to be at Court, between the factions of the two women, my Lady Castlemayne and Mrs. Stewart...and all will come to ruin!"

Thoroughout his reign one could easily 'plug and play' any 2 of Charles' mistresses into this sentence and it would pretty much work.

So, the new dice games comes with 2 dice, each with 6 names ~~Barbara, Francis, Nell, Moll, Louise & Hortense!

Roll away, fill in the blanks and you'll have just another day in the life of King Charles II!

JWB   Link to this

Purcell
See http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/404/#ref...

"...I met with Mr. Lock and Pursell, Masters of Music, and with them to the Coffee House, into a room next the water, by ourselves, where we spent an hour or two..."
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1660/02/21/

Geoff Hallett   Link to this

Thanks JWB, very interesting,followed your links. It is obvious Sam met Henry's father Thomas, unless Henry was in a pushchair, as he was born in that year.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

The L&M Companion says the Henry Purcell (Thomas' brother) Pepys met was Henry's father. Also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Purcell

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"Roll away, fill in the blanks and you’ll have just another day in the life of King Charles II!"

jeannine, are the dice loaded? If so, roll away, fill in the blankets and you’ll have just another night and day in the life of King Charles II!

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