Thursday 25 October 1666

Up betimes and by water to White Hall, and there with Sir G. Carteret to Sir W. Coventry, who is come to his winter lodgings at White Hall, and there agreed upon a method of paying of tickets; and so I back again home and to the office, where we sat all the morning, but to little purpose but to receive clamours for money. At noon home to dinner, where the two Mrs. Daniels come to see us, and dined with us. After dinner I out with my wife to Mrs. Pierces, where she hath not been a great while, from some little unkindness of my wife’s to her when she was last here, but she received us with mighty respect and discretion, and was making herself mighty fine to go to a great ball to-night at Court, being the Queene’s birthday; so the ladies for this one day do wear laces, but to put them off again to-morrow. Thence I to my Lord Bruncker’s, and with him to Mrs. Williams’s where we met Knipp. I was glad to see the jade. Made her sing; and she told us they begin at both houses to act on Monday next. But I fear, after all this sorrow, their gains will be but little. Mrs. Williams says, the Duke’s house will now be much the better of the two, because of their women; which I am glad to hear. Thence with Lord Bruncker to White Hall and there spoke with Sir W. Coventry about some office business, and then I away to Mrs. Pierces, and there saw her new closet, which is mighty rich and fine. Her daughter Betty grows mighty pretty. Thence with my wife home and to do business at the office. Then to Sir W. Batten’s, who tells me that the House of Parliament makes mighty little haste in settling the money, and that he knows not when it will be done; but they fall into faction, and libells have been found in the House. Among others, one yesterday, wherein they reckon up divers great sums to be given away by the King, among others, 10,000l. to Sir W. Coventry, for weare and teare (the point he stood upon to advance that sum by, for them to give the King); Sir G. Carteret 50,000l. for something else, I think supernumerarys; and so to Matt. Wren 5000l. for passing the Canary Company’s patent; and so a great many other sums to other persons. So home to supper and to bed.

11 Annotations

A. De Araujo   Link to this

"with might respect....making herself mighty fine.........which is mighty rich and fine....Betty grows mighty pretty.....Parliament makes mighty little haste......"
Sam is mighty repetitive today!

CGS   Link to this

scrip anyone, no coins :[sounds so modern]
"...there agreed upon a method of paying of tickets;..."

Margaret   Link to this

"...so the ladies for this one day do wear laces, but to put them off again to-morrow."

Can anyone explain this?

CGS   Link to this

may be if stayed laced up, they be strangled?
Girls liked looking like a timer, easier for the man to heft.

lace:
3. spec. a. A string or cord serving to draw together opposite edges (chiefly of articles of clothing, as bodices, stays, boots and shoes) by being passed in and out through eyelet-holes (or over hooks, studs, etc.) and pulled tight. Cf. boot-, shoe-, stay-lace.
lady's laces, n.

1625 K. LONG tr. Barclay's Argenis I. x. 28 Sprinkling water in her face, and cutting her laces, they made her fit abate.

1676 GREW Anat. Flowers i. §3 As Teeming Women, gradually slaken their Laces.
1. A net, noose, snare. Chiefly fig. Obs.
13.. K. Alis. 7698 Woman the haveth bycought: Woman the haveth in hire las!

2. a. A cord, line, string, thread, or tie. Obs. exc. spec. as in 3a.
a1300

4. ? transf. from 3a. In building: A tie beam; a brace. Also, a panelled ceiling (= L. laquear).
a1300

5. a. Ornamental braid used for trimming men's coats, etc.; a trimming of this. Now only in gold lace, silver lace, a braid formerly made of gold or silver
wire, now of silk or thread with a thin wrapping of gold or silver.

6. A slender open-work fabric of linen, cotton, silk, woollen, or metal threads, usually ornamented with inwrought or applied patterns. Often called after the place where it is manufactured, e.g. Brussels lace. For bobbin-, chain-, pillow-, point-, etc. lace, see the first member. Also BONE-LACE, BRIDE-LACE.
1555
lady's laces
a1548
Now hist. and rare.

Any of various variegated grasses; esp. a striped variety of reed canary grass, Phalaris arundinacea, grown as an ornamental. Occas. also in sing.
1597

Bryan M   Link to this

“…so the ladies for this one day do wear laces, but to put them off again to-morrow.”

I think the comment relates to the king's new (plainer) fashion first mentioned on 8 October. Lace collars are out (except for the queen's birthday).

See: 17th Century- The Golden Age of Lace. (link below) There are a couple of images at the bottom of the page that show a woman and man wearing lace collars.

http://www.suite101.com/article.cfm/lace_making...

Mary   Link to this

"the ladies ... do wear laces"
As CGS indicates, this almost certainly refers to laced 'bodies' (what we should later call corsets).

In the 17th century the corset was not primarily intended to restrict the waist, but more to push up and exaggerate the swell of the breasts. There was then achieved an attractive contrast between the flat, almost rigid, front aspect of the bodice and the soft curve of the breasts.

Lawrence   Link to this

“…so the ladies for this one day do wear laces, but to put them off again to-morrow.”
The court is still in mourning for the Queen’s mother, so all back into black tomorrow!

Michael Robinson   Link to this

" ... and libells have been found ... and so a great many other sums to other persons. So home to supper and to bed."

So the heat is off the Navy board and the accounting shortfalls.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Her daughter Betty grows mighty pretty."

"Sam...Dear Sam Pepys..." Betty holds out hand. "And dear Bess Pepys..." hand to Bess. "Sam, a word?"

Takes aside... "Pretty girl, my Betty...I saw you noticing her."

"Indeed, Mrs. Pierce. Sure to be a beaut...Mrs. Pierce?"

"Yes, Sam...That is one of James' scapels I'm holding in back of your thigh right now...Just above the femoral artery, I believe. If I, by accidental mischance...Say, a startle, caused by my daughter informing me of some ridiculously innocent flirtation on your part, should press just a bit too hard...You'd bleed to death in ten minutes."

Ummn...

"I would be very distressed but being a simple woman and James not being about, I'd be so flustered by this tragic accident I'd not have the slightest memory of how to apply a tourniquet and stop the bleeding...Do we understand each other, Sam?"

"Uh...Ha, ha...Uh...Oh, yes."

"It's such a joy to have you about, Samuel."

***
So poor Knipp's been demoted to "jade"?

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Then to Sir W. Batten’s, who tells me that the House of Parliament makes mighty little haste in settling the money, and that he knows not when it will be done; but they fall into faction, and libells have been found in the House."

(From "1776")

Lewis Morris: Mr. President, have you ever been present at a meeting of the New York legislature?

[John Hancock shakes his head "No"]

Lewis Morris: They speak very fast and very loud, and nobody listens to anybody else, with the result that nothing ever gets done.

[turns to the Congress as he returns to his seat]

Lewis Morris: I beg the Congress's pardon.

John Hancock: [grimly] My sympathies, Mr. Morris.

Our sympathies in dealing with the Mother of Parliaments, Mr. Pepys.

CGS   Link to this

were monies be, the erosion be.

Humans have always found ways to get their uncounted percentage, in some arenas it be called shrinkage.

"So the heat is off the Navy board and the accounting shortfalls."

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