Tuesday 31 July 1666

Good friends in the morning and up to the office, where sitting all the morning, and while at table we were mightily joyed with newes brought by Sir J. Minnes and Sir W. Batten of the death of De Ruyter, but when Sir W. Coventry come, he told us there was no such thing, which quite dashed me again, though, God forgive me! I was a little sorry in my heart before lest it might give occasion of too much glory to the Duke of Albemarle. Great bandying this day between Sir W. Coventry and my Lord Bruncker about Captain Cocke, which I am well pleased with, while I keepe from any open relyance on either side, but rather on Sir W. Coventry’s. At noon had a haunch of venison boiled and a very good dinner besides, there dining with me on a sudden invitation the two mayden sisters, Bateliers, and their elder brother, a pretty man, understanding and well discoursed, much pleased with his company. Having dined myself I rose to go to a Committee of Tangier, and did come thither time enough to meet Povy and Creed and none else. The Court being empty, the King being gone to Tunbridge, and the Duke of Yorke a-hunting. I had some discourse with Povy, who is mightily discontented, I find, about his disappointments at Court; and says, of all places, if there be hell, it is here. No faith, no truth, no love, nor any agreement between man and wife, nor friends. He would have spoke broader, but I put it off to another time; and so parted. Then with Creed and read over with him the narrative of the late [fight], which he makes a very poor thing of, as it is indeed, and speaks most slightingly of the whole matter. Povy discoursed with me about my Lord Peterborough’s 50l. which his man did give me from him, the last year’s salary I paid him, which he would have Povy pay him again; but I have not taken it to myself yet, and therefore will most heartily return him, and mark him out for a coxcomb. Povy went down to Mr. Williamson’s, and brought me up this extract out of the Flanders’ letters to-day come: That Admiral Everson, and the Admiral and Vice-Admiral of Freezeland, with many captains and men, are slain; that De Ruyter is safe, but lost 250 men out of his own ship; but that he is in great disgrace, and Trump in better favour; that Bankert’s ship is burned, himself hardly escaping with a few men on board De Haes; that fifteen captains are to be tried the seventh of August; and that the hangman was sent from Flushing to assist the Council of Warr. How much of this is true, time will shew. Thence to Westminster Hall and walked an hour with Creed talking of the late fight, and observing the ridiculous management thereof and success of the Duke of Albemarle. Thence parted and to Mrs. Martin’s lodgings, and sat with her a while, and then by water home, all the way reading the Narrative of the late fight in order, it may be, to the making some marginal notes upon it. At the Old Swan found my Betty Michell at the doore, where I staid talking with her a pretty while, it being dusky, and kissed her and so away home and writ my letters, and then home to supper, where the, brother and Mary Batelier are still and Mercer’s two sisters. They have spent the time dancing this afternoon, and we were very merry, and then after supper into the garden and there walked, and then home with them and then back again, my wife and I and the girle, and sang in the garden and then to bed. Colville was with me this morning, and to my great joy I could now have all my money in, that I have in the world. But the times being open again, I thinke it is best to keepe some of it abroad. Mighty well, and end this month in content of mind and body. The publique matters looking more safe for the present than they did, and we having a victory over the Dutch just such as I could have wished, and as the kingdom was fit to bear, enough to give us the name of conquerors, and leave us masters of the sea, but without any such great matters done as should give the Duke of Albemarle any honour at all, or give him cause to rise to his former insolence.

5 Annotations

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Thence parted and to Mrs. Martin’s lodgings, and sat with her a while..."

Monk Pepys apparently finds a few pleasures besides the music he mentioned yesterday.

Perhaps Bess' good-natured mood at dawn was based on the reflection that if Sam is overfond of "singing" with Mercer, she herself perhaps has enjoyed "painting" an awful lot with Mr. Browne...

Not to mention "dancing" with Capt. Ferrers and Lord Sandwich.

At least we who love Bess as much as Sam can hope...

***
Heaven...

"What the devil does he mean 'painting' and 'dancing'?"

"Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar, that nice Dr. Freud I've been seeing says." Bess notes. "And you notice I'd not asked as to the fondl...I mean, 'singing'."

"It really was singing."

"Well...It really was dancing with Pembleton."

"Oh?" Pleased tone...

Wait...She said nothing about the others... "Bess!"

And this being Heaven, where does that Freud fellow get off sending me bills for her 'sessions'?

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"I had some discourse with Povy, who is mightily discontented, I find, about his disappointments at Court; and says, of all places, if there be hell, it is here. No faith, no truth, no love, nor any agreement between man and wife, nor friends."

"disappointments" is an understatement -- recall 3 July when Pepys was told of: "Mr. Povy, whose vanity, prodigality, neglect of his business, and committing it to unfit hands hath undone him and outed him of all his publique employments, and the thing set on foot by an accidental revivall of a business, wherein he had three or fours years ago, by surprize, got the Duke of Yorke to sign to the having a sum of money paid out of the Excise, before some that was due to him, and now the money is fallen short, and the Duke never likely to be paid. This being revived hath undone Povy." http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1666/07/03/

It may be that Mr. Povey tells the truth about the court.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"But the times being open again, I thinke it is best to keepe some of it abroad"

"open" = unsettled (L&M Select Glossary)

"abroad" = away (L&M Select Glossary)

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"the brother" transcribe L&M: the comma in the text above seems to be a scanning error.

Nix   Link to this

"No faith, no truth, no love, nor any agreement between man and wife, nor friends." --

300 years later Harry Truman will observe: "If you want a friend in Washington, get a dog."

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