Wednesday 23 December 1663

Up betimes and my wife; and being in as mourning a dress as we could, at present, without cost, put ourselves into, we by Sir W. Pen’s coach to Mrs. Turner’s, at Salisbury Court, where I find my Lord’s coach and six horses. We staid till almost eleven o’clock, and much company came, and anon, the corps being put into the hearse, and the scutcheons set upon it, we all took coach, and I and my wife and Auditor Beale in my Lord Sandwich’s coach, and went next to Mrs. Turner’s mourning coach, and so through all the City and Shoreditch, I believe about twenty coaches, and four or five with six and four horses. Being come thither, I made up to the mourners, and bidding them a good journey, I took leave and back again, and setting my wife into a hackney out of Bishopsgate Street, I sent her home, and I to the ‘Change and Auditor Beale about his business. Did much business at the ‘Change, and so home to dinner, and then to my office, and there late doing business also to my great content to see God bless me in my place and opening honest ways, I hope to get a little money to lay up and yet to live handsomely. So to supper and to bed. My wife having strange fits of the toothache, some times on this, and by and by on that side of her tooth, which is not common.

24 Annotations

Pedro   Link to this

Shoreditch...Brewers Phrase and Fable

according to tradition, is so called from Jane Shore, who, it is said, died there in a ditch. This tale comes from a ballad in Pepys' collection; but the truth is, it receives its name from Sir John de Soerdich, lord of the manor in the reign of Edward III. 1
"I could not get one bit of bread
Whereby my hunger might be fed... .
So, weary of my life, at length
I yielded up my vital strength
Within a ditch ... which since that day
Is Shoreditch called, as writers say."


Duke of Shoreditch. The most successful of the London archers received this playful title. 2
"Good king, make not good Lord of Lincoln Duke of Shoreditch!"--The Poore Man's Peticion to the Kinge. (1603.)

Bradford   Link to this

This very night, Sam, you must sit down and write My Lord a nice thank you note, and send it by special messenger, or next time he'll make you take the hackney.

Paul Chapin   Link to this

So when did he return the coach and six?
He presumably didn't take them to the 'Change. Wish he'd told us, I feel a lack of closure.

Paul Chapin   Link to this

Thinking it through a little further,
I guess when he was through with the funeral procession he simply left the coach, and the driver took it back.

Linda   Link to this

Isn't it interesting that Sam isn't talking about getting a Christmas tree or buying a Christmas gift for his wife. There is no frantic cooking of Christmas cookies or buying a goose for Christmas day. Was all of this outlawed in this time of religious oppresion?

Michael Robinson   Link to this

much company came, ... the scutcheons set upon it, we all took coach, ... through all the City and Shoreditch, I believe about twenty coaches, and four or five with six and four horses.

To the greater glory of Pepys's dead and living ... "Si monumentum requiris circumspice."

Ruben   Link to this

Linda:
in the background info there are excellent annotations about Christmas as seen by Pepys.

jeannine   Link to this

Linda

Per Ruben's great comment above, the link is here
http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/314/

Rob   Link to this

Linda - the custom of Christmas trees was introduced to England by Prince Albert, not during Pepys' lifetime....

Bob T   Link to this

Sam is a person who lived in the seventeenth century, and does the same things as we do in the twenty-first. For the funeral he bums the use of a posh coach for himself and his wife, and he finds enough bits and pieces in his house to dress them in mourning. In other words, he did it on the cheap. Sound familiar?

Mary   Link to this

Elizabeth's toothache.

The L&M text reads:" sometimes on this, and by and by on that side of her mouth; which is not common."

This makes better sense. It is scarcely possible to tell which SIDE of a tooth is aching, though the appearance of a cavity could lead one to determine the cause of the toothache.

JWB   Link to this

"...and opening honest ways, I hope to get a little money to lay up and yet to live handsomely."

And so say all of us. Merry Christmas.

Ruben   Link to this

funeral
I think that Pepys has a ready set on his wardrobe for mourning. I retrieved this information from my memory, something not accurate as a written memo, but it did not take time from me.

Paul Dyson   Link to this

Being come thither, I made up to the mourners, and bidding them a good journey, I took leave and back again,

Sam's attendance at the funeral doesn't seem to involve participation in the service or burial, just being there for a time and putting on some show.

Terry F   Link to this

Peace, goodwill to all at Christmas!

no military, "the corps being put into the hearse"....

cumgranosalis   Link to this

Samuell wanted to make an impression "...we all took coach, and I and my wife and Auditor Beale in my Lord Sandwich's coach,..." 'Tis a way to emphasise his status in publick opinion.
Sam be thinking imprimo, imprimere, impressi, impressum: stamp of approval,
as long he not be an impresario.
A grand display all that clatter thru the City 20 coaches with all the citizens a wondering who be the dead one.
[see Beale for context]

A. De Araujo   Link to this

I understand the tradition of the Nativity Display at Christmas time was started by St Francis of Assisi in the 13th century; was it ever a tradition in England?

A. De Araujo   Link to this

Make it 14th century

Ruben   Link to this

Nativity Display at Christmas
From a Spanish site (translated and resumed by me):
After the first Nativity display in 1223 by Francis de Assisi the idea extended all over Italy.
But the oldest testimony with images instead of actors comes from the German monastery of Füsen (1252). In Spain the tradition was introduced by the Franciscan order in the XV century, but there is an old display (from 1300) that belonged to Barcelona's cathedral.
It was King Carlos III, in the XVIII century, who really introduced the Belen display to the general public, when he abandoned Naples throne to become King of Spain. He asked three Spanish artists to create 200 figures for his son Carlos IV. Many are still kept in the Royal Palace. They are of different sizes, to give an impression of perspective, once combined in the Nativity display.
see (in Spanish):
http://www.hispagenda.com/articulos/2006/12/07/...

Pedro   Link to this

I nominate Sam to appear as a Caganer in the Catalonian Nativity Scene!

Sorry to lower the tone of your annotation Ruben.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caganer

A. De Araujo   Link to this

Thanks Ruben and Pedro
Make it 13th century again.
I read that this year in Naples there is a figurine of a shepperd holding a tray with the head and the testicles of Berlusconi.

Ruben   Link to this

some 20 years ago, the best Christmas postcard of the year was one with a Santa in full dress hanging by his neck. I think it was published by the New Yorker.

cumgranosalis   Link to this

as a Caganer : my rumour: "to cag" ; dothe it come from Catalan?
slang to bum sumit:
"me old china [plate], got a fag that I can cag."
"not bludy likely,go and cag, sum ware else ........."

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Pepys!!!!!"

"My...My...My Lord?!"

"Where in the blazes of Hell is my coach and six?!!! They never came back!!!"

"Well?!!"

Uh...Ah...Ha...Ha...Ummn...Knew there was something I forgot last night.

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