Tuesday 17 November 1663

Up, and while I am dressing myself, Mr. Deane of Woolwich came to me, and I did tell him what had happened to him last Saturday in the office, but did encourage him to make no matter of it, for that I did not fear but he would in a little time be master of his enemies as much as they think to master him, and so he did tell me many instances of the abominable dealings of Mr. Pett of Woolwich towards him. So we broke up, and I to the office, where we sat all the forenoon doing several businesses, and at noon I to the ‘Change where Mr. Moore came to me, and by and by Tom Trice and my uncle Wight, and so we out to a taverne (the New Exchange taverne over against the ‘Change where I never was before, and I found my old playfellow Ben Stanley master of it), and thence to a scrivener to draw up a bond, and to another tavern (the King’s Head) we went, and calling on my cozen Angier at the India House there we eat a bit of pork from a cookes together, and after dinner did seal the bond, and I did take up the old bond of my uncle’s to my aunt, and here T. Trice before them do own all matters in difference between us is clear as to this business, and that he will in six days give me it under the hand of his attorney that there is no judgment against the bond that may give me any future trouble, and also a copy of their letters of his Administration to Godfrey, as much of it as concerns me to have. All this being done towards night we broke up, and so I home and with Mr. Moore to my office, and there I read to him the letter I have wrote to send to my Lord to give him an account how the world, both city and court, do talk of him and his living as he do there in such a poor and bad house so much to his disgrace. Which Mr. Moore do conclude so well drawn: that he would not have me by any means to neglect sending it, assuring me in the best of his judgment that it cannot but endear me to my Lord instead of what I fear of getting his offence, and did offer to take the same words and send them as from, him with his hand to him, which I am not unwilling should come (if they are at all fit to go) from any body but myself, and so, he being gone, I did take a copy of it to keep by me in shorthand, and sealed them up to send to-morrow by my Will. So home, Mr. Hollyard being come to my wife, and there she being in bed, he and I alone to look again upon her …, and there he do find that, though it would not be much pain, yet she is so fearful, and the thing will be somewhat painful in the tending, which I shall not be able to look after, but must require a nurse and people about her; so that upon second thoughts he believes that a fomentation will do as well, and though it will be troublesome yet no pain, and what her mayd will be able to do without knowing directly what it is for, but only that it may be for the piles. For though it be nothing but what is fiery honest, yet my wife is loth to give occasion of discourse concerning it. By this my mind and my wife’s is much eased, for I confess I should have been troubled to have had my wife cut before my face, I could not have borne to have seen it. I had great discourse with him about my disease. He tells me again that I must eat in a morning some loosening gruel, and at night roasted apples, that I must drink now and then ale with my wine, and eat bread and butter and honey, and rye bread if I can endure it, it being loosening. I must also take once a week a clyster of his last prescription, only honey now and then instead of butter, which things I am now resolved to apply myself to. He being gone I to my office again to a little business, and then home to supper and to bed, being in, a little pain by drinking of cold small beer to-day and being in a cold room at the Taverne I believe.

22 Annotations

Terry F   Link to this

*L&M* provides what Wheatley elides

"So home, Mr. Hollyard being come to my wife. And there, she being in bed, he and I alone to look again upon her parts, and there he do find that though it would not be much pain, yet she is so fearful...." Here Pepys writes in the margin > "so that upon second thoughts he believes that a fomentation will do as well,..."

Methinks Wheatley avoids "her parts" as suggesting her anatomy's anterior.

fo·men·ta·tion
n.
1. A substance or material used as a warm, moist medicinal compress; a poultice.
2. The therapeutic application of warmth and moisture, as to relieve pain.
http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com...

Terry F   Link to this

Here Pepys writes in the margin - Physique > >

Bradford   Link to this

Mr. Moore "did offer to take the same words and send them as from, him with his hand to him, which I am not unwilling should come (if they are at all fit to go) from any body but myself,"

This seems to mean that Moore thinks so well of Pepys's letter to Sandwich that he is willing to send it as his own, if Pepys shies off; but if it to be sent, Sam would rather own it as his own? So I read it; how about you? The sentence is rather tangled, and that apostrophe between "from, him" doesn't help.

"For though it be nothing but what is fiery honest,"---grand expression.

Gruel, apples, rye bread: get ye some fibre inside ye, man, it'll do you a wonder.

Terry F   Link to this

"I did take a copy of it...in shorthand"

This the first time Pepys uses this term in the Diary. Is this an early use of what was, at that time, normally called "cipher" or "cypher"?

Mary House   Link to this

Although the plan was changed, Hollyard originally planned to perform an invasive medical procedure. Why would he not have done this early in the day when there was more natural light?

Paul Chapin   Link to this

"rye bread if I can endure it"
Wonder what was so hard to endure about rye bread at that time. Maybe it was like today's Rye-Krisp?

ellen   Link to this

Shorthand...perhaps he means the kind of code writing he uses for the diary

Paul Chapin   Link to this

Mr. Moore and Sam's letter to Sandwich
Bradford, I read the passage pretty much the same way you did, except there is that pesky "I am not unwilling", which would seem to suggest that Sam was willing for Moore to act as author. But then Sam makes himself a file copy, and seals his letter for delivery tomorrow, so he's taking it on himself.

The whole thread about the admonitory letter to Sandwich over the past week or two has reminded me of the old story of "Who will bell the cat?"

Nate   Link to this

Wonder what was so hard to endure about rye bread at that time.

A few years ago I came across a scathing reference to rye bread from a few hundred years ago. Apparently it didn't taste good and caused great flatulence. Isn't modern rye made with both rye and wheat flour?

aqua   Link to this

messenger oh! messenger, whose neck will be hung ? 'Tis an age old delemma of all of whom want to help a friend from making an idiot of himself.
and Sam wants to put a halt to the maliciousness of the fusci nasi.
Virgil doth say in Aeneid,1v,174
"Fama malum quo non aliud velocius ullu."

Patricia   Link to this

In Louisbourg, Isle Royale, in 1745, only the soldiers ate brown bread. It wasn't fit for persons of any status: they ate white bread. Wasn't there some kind of trouble in the American Colonies over the Brits' control of white flour? or taxing it? Perhaps the problem with rye bread is partly its colour and social associations. (Historic Louisbourg is near Sydney, Nova Scotia.)

Terry F   Link to this

Shorthand

Clear what he meant by it; he has not used the *word* before.
He learned how to write it from *A Tutor to Tachygraphy, Or, Short-Writing; Tachygraphy* by Thomas Shelton

According to this source "There were many names for shorthand over the years - brachygraphy, tachygraphy and stenography are just a few. The word shorthand first appeared in an epitaph to be found in Westminster Abbey. It concerns William Laurence who died on December 28, 1661:
'Shorthand he wrote, his flowre in prime did fade,
And hasty death shorthand of him hath made.'"
http://www.ncraonline.org/about/history/shortha...

The OED might show it attested earlier.

Andrew Hamilton   Link to this

"not unwilling"

There's another reading possible, and that is that Sam has agreed with Moore's plan. Sam, "not unwilling" that Moore send the letter as his own, makes a copy for himself, and "sealed them up to send tomorrow by my Will." He doesn't say to whom he is sending "them" (whose meaning is obscure). But the language as readily suggests "to Moore" as "to Sandwich."

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Pepys, dear fellow...Now, as to your kind letter."

Arrggh...Sam drops groaning to Sandwich's quick sword thrust.

"I did appreciate your candor, my friend, truly, and I want you to know I shall be guided by your honest concern for my honor and family. Creed?"

Creed moves to remove the remains... "My Lord...Seeing as the position of Clerk of the Acts is now vacant...And knowing...Mind the blood, my lord...You would want a man of your own in such an important post..."

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"For though it be nothing but what is fiery honest, yet my wife is loth to give occasion of discourse concerning it."

Hmmn...Wonder what Sam bases that on? Hollier's opinion? Or when the sores first appeared was Bess his sole and only sexual partner?

"Ummn...Mr. Pepys?"

"Miss Crisp? Mrs. Lane?" Sam a bit perturbed to find both his indiscreet amours at his front door.

"Sir...We, uh..." Diana hesistates. Betty a bit more forthright...

"We heard bout Mrs. Pepys, poor lass, sir, from a boy of Mr. Hollier's, sir. Whilst Diana here was in me stall for linen, you know. And we were a mite bothered at it, Mr. Pepys. And me noticing Diana here was troubled as I was...Well, we set to talkin', sir and we realized we both...Well, Mr. Pepys..." coy smile...

"I see..."

"Yes, and we wanted to know, sir." Diana still a bit nervous about hitting the mark.

"Sir, we both got a few sores ourselves...Begging yor pardon at the mention of such things to a gentleman, sir...And we was wondering if Mr. Hollier might have a look, sir."

"Sores? Both?" choking sound from Sam...

"Not meaning to spread any blame round, sir. All knowing what we was doing, eh sir?" Betty kindly notes.

"I don't wants to die of a pox!!" Diana howls.

"Now, lass..." Betty patting...

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Pepys." the newly arrived Dr. Pierce eyes him...And the two ladies, Betty smiling at an old...linen...customer, waiting patiently in the Pepys' parlor.

"Pierce?"

"I...Ummn...Heard as to Mrs. Pepys, Pepys from the apothecary Hollier and I use. Dreadful thing, eh?"

Does everyone know? Sam blinks.

Wait? Why is he looking at me like that?

"Pepys. First, God knows, I want you to know I'm not a jealous man. But you see the thing is..."

"Exactly where are hers, sir?" Betty asks politely.

Bradford   Link to this

Picard, if I don't mistake myself (a phrase that's much better in French), says something to the point about dark vs. white breads. Who has their copy to hand?

"The Shorter Pepys" punctuates this part of that tortuous sentence thus:

"and send them, as from him with his hand, to him---"

"unwilling" is the trouble word, where "willing" would make all clear.
It is no spoiler to say that tomorrow we will find out about sending the letter, and settle all doubt as to who claimed authorship.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...and there he do find that, though it would not be much pain, yet she is so fearful, and the thing will be somewhat painful in the tending, which I shall not be able to look after, but must require a nurse and people about her; so that upon second thoughts he believes that a fomentation will do as well, and though it will be troublesome yet no pain, and what her mayd will be able to do without knowing directly what it is for, but only that it may be for the piles. For though it be nothing but what is fiery honest, yet my wife is loth to give occasion of discourse concerning it. By this my mind and my wife's is much eased, for I confess I should have been troubled to have had my wife cut before my face, I could not have borne to have seen it."

"Sam? Who are these men?" Bess stares from her bed.

"Nothing to worry yourself about, darling. I've called in the Gresham College team to help with our problem. May I introduce...Dr. Robert Hooke..."

Gnarled little Hooke bows... "Ma'am."

"Mr. John Evelyn."

"Mrs. Pepys. I wish you better health, ma'am."

"Our good friend Greatorex. Greatorex?"

Greatorex pauses in his measurement of the wound's size. "Yes, rest assured Mrs. Pepys...All our skills shall be bent to resolve this difficulty."

"Pepys? So where is our poor patient...Ah..."

"Your Majesty?!" Bess stares.

"I hope you don't mind that I brought my Lady along." Charles leads Castlemaine forward. "I thought as a woman she might bring a unique insight to the case."

aqua   Link to this

Bread be 1d per 10 oz loaf, fresh flower [flour] had to be dried before using, bread be made from wheat or rye.
The purifying of bread or making it white is an interesting Question.
Picard, on Bread, limited to the above.

aqua   Link to this

Breads of the Day, Wheat, Rye and Barly,
White bread be modern. snippets from OED:
OED: f. White bread; a white loaf. colloq.
1960 WENTWORTH & FLEXNER Dict. Amer. Slang 576/1 White, white bread.
1549-62 STERNHOLD & H. Ps. cxxvii. 2 Feeding full hardly with *browne bread.
1863 WATTS Dict. Chem. I. 657 The coarser kinds of bread, such as the..*black bread of Germany.
2. a. A well-known article of food prepared by moistening, kneading, and baking meal or flour, generally with the addition of yeast or leaven.

Bergie   Link to this

Why Sam balks at rye bread--
Because rye flour has less gluten than wheat flour, dough made with a high proportion of rye flour doesn't rise as much as wheat bread. Bread made wholly from rye flour would be dense and unpalatable to one used to light, fluffy breads.

language hat   Link to this

"I am not unwilling"

I suspect this is a simple slip for "not willing" -- an extremely common sort of error. We have a hard time with negatives.

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