Monday 26 January 1662/63

Up and by water with Sir W. Batten to White Hall, drinking a glass of wormewood wine at the Stillyard, and so up to the Duke, and with the rest of the officers did our common service; thence to my Lord Sandwich’s, but he was in bed, and had a bad fit last night, and so I went to, Westminster Hall, it being Term time, it troubling me to think that I should have any business there to trouble myself and thoughts with. Here I met with Monsieur Raby, who is lately come from France. [He] tells me that my Lord Hinchingbroke and his brother do little improve there, and are much neglected in their habits and other things; but I do believe he hath a mind to go over as their tutour, and so I am not apt to believe what he says therein. But I had a great deal of very good discourse with him, concerning the difference between the French and the Pope, and the occasion, which he told me very particularly, and to my great content; and of most of the chief affairs of France, which I did enquire: and that the King is a most excellent Prince, doing all business himself; and that it is true he hath a mistress, Mademoiselle La Valiere, one of the Princess Henriette’s women, that he courts for his pleasure every other day, but not so as to make him neglect his publique affairs. He tells me how the King do carry himself nobly to the relations of the dead Cardinall,1 and will not suffer one pasquill to come forth against him; and that he acts by what directions he received from him before his death. Having discoursed long with him, I took him by coach and set him down at my Lord Crew’s, and myself went and dined at Mr. Povy’s, where Orlando Massam, Mr. Wilks, a Wardrobe man, myself and Mr. Gawden, and had just such another dinner as I had the other day there. But above all things I do the most admire his piece of perspective especially, he opening me the closett door, and there I saw that there is nothing but only a plain picture hung upon the wall. After dinner Mr. Gauden and I to settle the business of the Tangier victualling, which I perceive none of them yet have hitherto understood but myself. Thence by coach to White Hall, and met upon the Tangier Commission, our greatest business the discoursing of getting things ready for my Lord Rutherford to go about the middle of March next, and a proposal of Sir J. Lawson’s and Mr. Cholmely’s concerning undertaking the Mole, which is referred to another time. So by coach home, being melancholy, overcharged with business, and methinks I fear that I have some ill offices done to Mr. Coventry, or else he observes that of late I have not despatched business so as I did use to do, which I confess I do acknowledge. But it may be it is but my fear only, he is not so fond as he used to be of me. But I do believe that Sir W. Batten has made him believe that I do too much crow upon having his kindness, and so he may on purpose to countenance him seem a little more strange to me, but I will study hard to bring him back again to the same degree of kindness. So home, and after a little talk with my wife, to the office, and did a great deal of business there till very late, and then home to supper and to bed.

  1. Cardinal Mazarin died March 9th, 1661.

36 Annotations

Terry F   Link to this

pasquill

lampoons, satires, later known as mazarinades (so L&M and others) had been issued about the Cardinal -- as though this were a new genre in the 19th century and beyond.

Terry F   Link to this

"Mazarinades are the name given to the numerous pamphlets that were printed in France before and during the Fronde (1648-1653). They take their name from Cardinal Jules Mazarin (1602-1661), who is the subject of most these tracts, and they represent the first mass use of the press for the purposes of political propaganda." For a facsimile cover of one from 1649 and Transcriptions thereof (in French) see http://www.babelstone.co.uk/Mazarinades/

Terry F   Link to this

"Term time"

The beginning of the term of Parliament's sitting at Westminster Hall.

(Though this is the fourth time Sam has attended it and called it so, it is not in either L&M's Select or Greater Glosssaries, and there was as yet no remark on the, ah, term -- so I thought I'd make one.)

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

"and methinks I fear that I have some ill offices done to Mr. Coventry, or else he observes that of late I have not despatched business so as I did use to do, which I confess I do acknowledge"

Hey Sam, maybe it was that business of "guiding Mr. Coventry to sign a bill to Mr. Creed for his pay as Deputy Treasurer to this day, though the service ended 5 or 6 months ago"?

http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1663/01/17/

Australian Susan   Link to this

Povey's perspective picture

Sam's note today makes it clear that Mr P had the picture hung as a trompe d'oeil painting as it is today at Dyrham Park.

Term Time

Sam is gloomy about the pending start up again of his legal business: it has dragged on, hasn't it. rather like Bleak House.

jeannine   Link to this

"The King (Louis XIV)..that he courts for his pleasure every other day, but not so as to make him neglect his publique affairs"... what an interesting comment, perhaps a little comparison to a certain other King who is often accused of neglecting his public affairs while in the pursuit of women??? I wish I could really understand the tone/intent here -not sure if this is just an innocent observation or perhaps a little sarcasm on what is a sore spot to many in the circle of Charles II. Also, of note Sam did detail his disgust about Charles II's activities during his end of year wrap up on Dec 31, 1662 (second section-link below).
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1662/12/31/#ann...

dirk   Link to this

Remember the Rev. Josselin?

Today is his birthday...

"Jan: 26. 1662. my 47. year enters. 46 ended -- When I look back I find I may set up my Eben-ezer hitherto god, has helped me, and when I look forward, this promise is mine. I will never fail thee nor forsake thee. I am now settled in a habitation of my own on Colne green which god has given me."

dirk   Link to this

"I do the most admire his piece of perspective especially, he opening me the closett door, and there I saw that there is nothing but only a plain picture hung upon the wall."

As suspected, this is clearly some kind of "trompe l'oeuil" -- "deceive the eye" painting: an image, usually "grisaille" that suggests the depth of sculpture work (shadows and all) so skilfully that it really does deceive the eye.

This kind of thing was very popular in the 17th c., and the best makers of it were to be found in Flanders. Of course the illusion of depth is helped by hiding the edges of the image. It seems that this is the case here, presumably by a specially made closet which shows the image through a central opening in the closet door, while hiding the edges. But Sam is allowed a look inside...

dirk   Link to this

Some may consider this a slight **spoiler** -- as it refers to Sam's visit to Verelst's studio on April 11th 1669 !!!

Here is a "trompe l'oeuil" painting, contemporary to Pepys, by the Dutch artist Verelst -- with a discussion of Sam's admiration for this artist.

http://www.historicalportraits.com/p_view.asp?I...

Bradford   Link to this

Superb find, Dirk---and while the flowers &c. might not fool our eye today, the marble shelf that the vase rests on qualifies.

"Sir W. Batten has made [Mr. Coventry] believe that I do too much crow upon having his kindness . . . I will study hard to bring him back again to the same degree of kindness."
Such moment-by-moment temperature-taking of any relationship tends to cause worry even when none is justified: perhaps not everyone else around you is examining you quite as closely as you suppose, since most people think most often of themselves.

Terry F   Link to this

It may be OT to observe that the tradition of trompe l’oeuil continued in Holland for over 300 years, influenced and was visually analyzed by Maurits C. Escher (1898-1972) (made more famous by *Gödel, Escher, Bach* by Douglas Hofstadter). Here is Escher's Gallery 1946
http://www.mcescher.com/Gallery/back-bmp/LW346.jpg

(not as pertinent as Dirk's contributions!)

in Aqua Scripto   Link to this

"...and so I went to, Westminster Hall, it being Term time, it troubling me to think that I should have any business there to trouble myself..." There be no entry of the House of Commons sitting until 18th of Feb.
and one of the issues be :
"Protections.
Resolved, upon the Question, That no Member of this House do grant any Protection to any, but such only as are their menial Servants: And that all Protections, already granted to any other Persons besides menial Servants, be forthwith withdrawn, and called in."
along with proper attendance to Church Prayer.
From: 'House of Commons Journal Volume 8: 18 February 1663', Journal of the House of Commons: volume 8: 1660-1667 (1802), pp. 436-37. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?com.... Date accessed: 27 January 2006.

in Aqua Scripto   Link to this

"...and after a little talk with my wife, to the office, and did a great deal of business there till very late, and then home to supper and to bed...."
of course, there she[Eliza] be, stuck twiddling thumbs.

in Aqua Scripto   Link to this

The difference between the Sun King and Charles, be that Charles has neglected Parliament, Money is not be used for the original intention, and he is flaunting his Affaires while His Advisors be twiddling their thumbs too. Meanwhile Sam gets the impression that State Business in Paris be normal. Of course that be good public propaganda put out by Vesailles. As Sam hasn't any alternative views to make sound judgements, he should get out the shaker of salt.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Why just the other day our boy flew so high none could touch him. What a difference a day or two...And a slight coolness from the Boss...Makes.

Ah, don't worry Sam...Coventry was probably just sleeping with Bess the night you stayed with Creed and feels a tad diffident with you now.

***

For fun, a link to a memoir of the court of Louis XIV by the Duke of Saint-Simon. Interesting to get an eyewitness view from the other side...http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/3/8/7/3875/3875-h/3875-h.htm#image-0001

Jesse   Link to this

"I do the most admire his piece of perspective"

Some modern "perspective" on pavement (sorry 'bout the long link) http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://w...

Mary   Link to this

Westminster Hall/term time.

Legal term, surely. Sam's troubling thoughts concern his ongoing legal problems with Uncle Robert's estate.

Alastair   Link to this

One of the best trompe l'oeil paintings (as Sam would say) I have ever seen in my life is in Chatsworth House in Derbyshire and is of a violin & bow hanging on a door. http://www.chatsworth-house.co.uk/learning/artc...

Wim van der Meij   Link to this

Here two trompe l'oeils from the Rijksmuseum; one is an example of a grisaille Dirk spoke about: http://www.cultuurwijzer.nl/cultuurwijzer.nl/cu...

A. Hamilton   Link to this

Mr. Coventry

Makes Sam reflect "I have not despatched business so as I did use to do" (drinking with Batten again may be one reason) and there is the shadow of the misdated invoice for Creed, but Sam also notes a comment suggesting Coventry may feel he has gotten the Navy office to perform as he wants, and by inference has less time to spend on that project and is beginning to turn his attention elsewhere,a development that could make Sam's eagerness for his company and appprobation burdensome to him:

"But by the way Mr. Coventry was saying that there remained nothing now in our office to be amended but what would do of itself every day better and better, for as much as he that was slowest, Sir W. Batten, do now begin to look about him and to mind business. At which, God forgive me! I was a little moved with envy..." Jan. 19

A. Hamilton   Link to this

"Westminster Hall, it being Term time, it troubling me to think that I should have any business there to trouble myself"

I think the reference here is to the law courts, not parliament, in which case Sam's apprehension is explained by the on-going contests over Robert Pepys's will.

JohnT   Link to this

Pasquill. The reference to a " pasquill" is fascinating. There is some evolution from the italian and french terms pasquino and pasquillo. There is a statue in the piazza Pasquino (next to the much more famous Piazza Navona ) in Rome of a battered soldier, it is claimed originally depicting a character from the Iliad. Apparently a cobbler in about 1500 started attaching satires and lampoons to the statue at night to avoid censorship. Others followed suit and have been doing so ever since. Even today you can see the latest crop. ( For those tempted to visit and have a look there is a very good wine bar , " Cul de Sac", from where you can admire the ancient statue). http://palazzolivia.it/eng/maps_of_rome/pasquin...

JohnT   Link to this

A better link on "pasquinades" - http://www.nerone.cc/newslett/pasquino.html

A. Hamilton   Link to this

Pasquill

Thank you, John T.

OED confirms this with a colorful tale. Pasquil[l] is an obsolete form of

"Pasquin, n.

("p&skwIn) [ult. ad. It. Pasquino, in L. PasquWnus, F. Pasquin.
Pasquino or Pasquillo was the name popularly given to a mutilated statue, or piece of ancient statuary, disinterred at Rome in the year 1501, and set up by Cardinal Caraffa at the corner of his palace near the Piazza Navona. Under his patronage, it became the annual custom on St. Mark's Day to ‘restore’ temporarily and dress up this torso to represent some historical or mythological personage of antiquity; on which occasion professors and students of the newly restored Ancient Learning were wont to salute Pasquin in Latin verses which were usually posted or placed on the statue. In process of time these pasquinate or pasquinades tended to become satirical, and the term began to be applied, not only in Rome, but in other countries, to satirical compositions and lampoons, political, ecclesiastical, or personal, the anonymous authors of which often sheltered themselves under the conventional name of Pasquin. According to Mazocchi, in the preface to the printed collection of the pasquinate of 1509, the name Pasquino or Pasquillo originated in that of a schoolmaster (‘literator seu magister ludi’) who lived opposite the spot where the statue was found; a later tradition given by Castelvetro, 1558–9, made Pasquino a caustic tailor or shoemaker; another of 1544 calls him a barber. See L. Morandi in Nuova Antologia 1889 I. 271, 755, D. Gnoli ibid. 1890 I. 51, 275, Storia di Pasquino. The latinized form Pasquillus was already a1544 applied both to the author and the pasquinade, in which extended application it was subseq. followed also by Pasquin.]

1. The Roman Pasquino (man or statue), on whom pasquinades were fathered; hence, the imaginary personage to whom anonymous lampoons were conventionally ascribed."

slangist   Link to this

great discussion of "pasquill, pasquinade"
a term long since admired in a favorite sentence (not inapplicable to sam's oeuvre) from lawrence sterne's "tristram shandy" (1759) vol. 1, chapter xiv:

Could a historiographer drive on his history, as a muleteer drives on his mule,-- straight forward;--for instance, from Rome all the way to Loretto, without ever once turning his head aside, either to the right hand or to the left,- -he might venture to foretell you to an hour when he should get to his journey's end;--but the thing is, morally speaking, impossible: For, if he is a man of the least spirit, he will have fifty deviations from a straight line to make with this or that party as he goes along, which he can no ways avoid. He will have views and prospects to himself perpetually soliciting his eye, which he can no more help standing still to look at than he can fly; he will moreover have various Accounts to reconcile: Anecdotes to pick up: Inscriptions to make out: Stories to weave in: Traditions to sift: Personages to call upon: Panegyricks to paste up at this door; Pasquinades at that:--All which both the man and his mule are quite exempt from.

A. Hamilton   Link to this

Westminster Hall/term time.

Just noticed your entry, Mary. I apologize for my redundancy.

Terry F   Link to this

"Term time"

is always used by Sam when he visits Westminster Hall. http://www.gyford.com/cgi-sys/cgiwrap/gyford/gy...
3 February 1659/60:
About noon Mrs. Turner came to speak with me, and Joyce, and I took them and shewed them the manner of the Houses sitting, the doorkeeper very civilly opening the door for us. Thence with my cozen Roger Pepys, it being term time

A. Hamilton   Link to this

“Term time” is always used by Sam when he visits Westminster Hall.

An ambiguity in the 1660 citation lies in the fact that Roger Pepys was both a Member of Parliament and a barrister. On the present occasion, since as IAS notes Parliament is not in session, term time surely only refers to the law courts.

Bradford   Link to this

Holbein's "Ambassadors" is the famous example of anamorphic distortion.

Jesse, here's a shorter URL for that site:

http://www.rense.com/general67/street.htm

Truly dementing.

Terry F   Link to this

Hans Holbein’s dizzying “The Ambassadors" 1533, National Gallery, London, UK”

http://www.abcgallery.com/H/holbein/holbein16.html

Terry F   Link to this

Per Robert Gertz, "For fun, a link to a memoir of the court of Louis XIV by the Duke of Saint-Simon. Interesting to get an eyewitness view from the other side…" http://pglaf.org/~widger/folder/cm38b10h/cm38b1... Madame Maintenon in Conferance—painted by Sir John Gilbert

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Always liked the good Madame, thanks Terry.

Paul Chapin   Link to this

Many thanks for all the info on "pasquill"
I spent over an hour yesterday trying to find out what it meant, with no success. Got so frustrated I ordered a copy of the OED on CD-ROM. Might have known our learned colleagues would come to the rescue.

in Aqua Scripto   Link to this

OED: big dark secret: the OED, be on line from thy Library, using your tax payers solution .

language hat   Link to this

It's also free online for anyone through the end of the month:
http://oed.com/bbcwords/

Terry Foreman   Link to this

dirk's "spoiler" of Pepys's visit to the studio of Simon Pietersz Verelst 11 April 1669

"But by accident [ 'Jan Looten, the landscape-drawer, a Dutchman, living in St. James’s Market' ] did direct us to a painter that was then in the house with him, a Dutchman, newly come over, one Evarelst, who took us to his lodging close by, and did shew us a little flower-pot of his doing, the finest thing that ever, I think, I saw in my life; the drops of dew hanging on the leaves, so as I was forced, again and again, to put my finger to it, to feel whether my eyes were deceived or no. He do ask 70l. for it: I had the vanity to bid him 20l.; but a better picture I never saw in my whole life; and it is worth going twenty miles to see it. " http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1669/04/11/

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