Wednesday 11 November 1668

Up, and my wife with me as before, and so to the Office, where, by a speciall desire, the new Treasurers come, and there did shew their Patent, and the Great Seal for the suspension of my Lord Anglesey: and here did sit and discourse of the business of the Office: and brought Mr. Hutchinson with them, who, I hear, is to be their Paymaster, in the room of Mr. Waith. For it seems they do turn out every servant that belongs to the present Treasurer: and so for Fenn, do bring in Mr. Littleton, Sir Thomas’s brother, and oust all the rest. But Mr. Hutchinson do already see that his work now will be another kind of thing than before, as to the trouble of it. They gone, and, indeed, they appear, both of them, very intelligent men, I home to dinner, and there with my people dined, and so to my wife, who would not dine with [me] that she might not have the girle come in sight, and there sat and talked a while with her and pretty quiet, I giving no occasion of offence, and so to the office [and then by coach to my cozen Roger Pepys, who did, at my last being with him this day se’nnight, move me as to the supplying him with 500l. this term, and 500l. the next, for two years, upon a mortgage, he having that sum to pay, a debt left him by his father, which I did agree to, trusting to his honesty and ability, and am resolved to do it for him, that I may not have all I have lie in the King’s hands. Having promised him this I returned home again, where to the office], and there having done, I home and to supper and to bed, where, after lying a little while, my wife starts up, and with expressions of affright and madness, as one frantick, would rise, and I would not let her, but burst out in tears myself, and so continued almost half the night, the moon shining so that it was light, and after much sorrow and reproaches and little ravings (though I am apt to think they were counterfeit from her), and my promise again to discharge the girle myself, all was quiet again, and so to sleep.


26 Annotations

CGS  •  Link

Maybe for those that need to have insight to life of the female in a bad relationship in 1660-90 should read a book by a man born in Jan 1660 one Daniel DeFoe , who created a novel new to the world, from experience found by spending time in a famous goal for ne'redowells , the book be Moll Flanders.

Robert Gertz  •  Link

"...after much sorrow and reproaches and little ravings #though I am apt to think they were counterfeit from her#..."

So even Bess unable to maintain quite that level of ferocity indefinitely, although determined to try...Also, by the same token, one might question the sincerity of all your tears, Samuel. It's possible Bess on reflection has considered the fact that the worst so far has not equalled what she likely feared, Sam having behaved insultingly, foolishly, and badly but not gone all the way...With Deb. It's interesting she doesn't seem to be pressing him for info as to other women he might have been involved with, or if she is, he doesn't choose to mention it. Since Deb's testimony was doubtless sincere, unless some new disaster...Say a friend relating dangerous info to Bess on hearing of the Willet affair...Occurs, our boy may yet escape utter marital destruction. Fortunately it's unlikely Bagwell will speak up unless William decides it's the right time to put the screws to one Pepys...Or Mrs. Martin or her sister Doll likewise chooses to advance her husband's interests...Or Mrs. Burroughs decides her widow's mite needs serious enlargement...Or Diana Crisp decides on hearing of Bess' sorrow that she must unburden herself, being actually better than San thought she should be...Or that foolish maid Sam encountered once should decide...

"Diana Crisp?..."

"Bess, you must have read that entry...Didn't you? Bess?"

languagehat  •  Link

"who, I hear, is to be their Paymaster, in the room of Mr. Waith."

Just to be clear, this is not "room" in the modern sense; we would say "in place of Mr. Waith."

Terry Foreman  •  Link

The very elements are in sympathy with the turmoil in the Pepys household

John Gadbury’s London Diary

Great winds and rain at night

FJA  •  Link

Great winds and rain at night, but "the moon shining so that it was light".

Terry Foreman  •  Link

" so to the Office, where, by a speciall desire, the new Treasurers come, and there did shew their Patent, and the Great Seal for the suspension of my Lord Anglesey: and here did sit and discourse of the business of the Office: and brought Mr. Hutchinson with them, who, I hear, is to be their Paymaster, in the room of Mr. Waith."

L&M: Richard Hutchinson had been Treasurer of the Navy, 1651-60. Waith continued in office jointly with him: CSPD 1668-9, p. 605.

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"and so for Fenn, do bring in Mr. Littleton, Sir Thomas’s brother,"

L&M: James Littleton replaced John Fenn as cashier to the Treasurer.

Timo  •  Link

It has occurred to me over recent weeks that it is a very long time since Sam last reckoned his accounts and thanked God for his good fortune. During the past year he has been so embroiled in political intrigue, domestic infidelities, an effectively bankrupt Admiralty offering little scope for any shady side deals, and not to forget behind put over a barrel to the tune of an eye watering 500 quid by his returning cousin, that it does make one wonder how his income has suffered during ‘68. I got the impression from earlier entries that he and his colleagues were effectively ‘self employed’ and lived off whatever income they could generate through the navy’s activities. Or, has he been receiving a regular income from the office? Interesting to note that he is now considering loaning out his wealth as a means to spread his risk.

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

You're right, Timo. Pepys stopped telling us what he was worth at the end of May 1667. But I don't think the "gratuities" ended, as he couldn't afford a coach then, and he can now, plus the new fireplace, etc.
You might find this interesting:
https://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/9548/

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

"I got the impression from earlier entries that he and his colleagues were effectively ‘self employed’ and lived off whatever income they could generate through the navy’s activities. Or, has he been receiving a regular income from the office?"

Pepys did receive some fixed incomes, and at the beginning of the Diary he lives on the one from being the Clerk of the Acts while he 'learned the ropes', so to speak:

"During the period of the Diary his salary as Clerk of the Acts was £350 a year; while in 1665 he was appointed Treasurer of the Tangier Commission, and from 1665 to 1667 he was Surveyor-General of Victualling with an additional £300 a year ..."

https://www.gutenberg.org/files/48353/48353-h/483…
Title: Samuel Pepys and the Royal Navy
Author: J. R. (Joseph Robson) Tanner
Release Date: February 24, 2015 [eBook #48353]
Page 28

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

Welcome John Gadbury to our annotations ... see the box top right, "ALSO ON THIS DAY".

Mr. Gadbury was quite a character, wrote lots of pamphlets and almanacs, and changed religions as the wind blows. He will tell us about the weather today.

Phil has given him a page https://www.pepysdiary.com/news/2011/11/12/13067/…

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

War profiteering in the time of the plague, JB. The bosses and MPs were off at Oxford, Pepys was running the show alone, no one was watching the store very closely, and as we are experiencing, plagues create inflation and shortages. He could wheel and deal, and so long as the invoices in equalled the money out, who knew the details?

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

More about Pepys' 'good fortune' of 1665:

The practical breakdown of the victualling system during the spring and summer of 1665 led to the establishment, at Pepys' suggestion, of new machinery for keeping the Victualer up to the mark — a Surveyor of Victuals appointed at the King's charge in each port, with power to examine the Victualer's books; and a central officer in London to whom they were to report weekly[218].
[218] Calendar of State Papers, Domestic, 1665-6, p. 7; see also p. 11, and Diary, 14 October, 1665.

As soon as Pepys' plan was adopted, he wrote to suggest that he himself should be the new Surveyor-General of Victualling[219], and on 27 October, 1665 he accepted office[220] at a salary of £300 a year[221].
[219] Diary, 19 October, 1665.
[220] Diary, 27 October, 1665.
[221] Diary, 31 October, 1665.

The appointment was only temporary and came to an end at the conclusion of the peace.

While it lasted it effected a slight improvement. Pepys was pleased with the success of his arrangements, and he was complimented upon them by the Duke of York[222].
[222] Diary, 26 July, 1666.

As he had £500 a year from Gauden as well as the £300 from the King[223], he managed to do well out of the war.
[223] Diary, 4 June, 1667.

The experience of the war had shewn the weak points of the one-man system, and in subsequent contracts several Victualers were associated in a kind of partnership[224], but the fundamental difficulty was one of finance, and thus merely multiplying the people did little to solve the problem.
[224] See Catalogue of Pepysian MSS., i. 155.

Thus there are complaints in 1671[225], and the difficulties were greatly increased when the Third Anglo-Dutch War broke out in the spring of 1672.
[225] See Catalogue of Pepysian MSS., i. 156-7.

The Victualers received such scanty payments from the Government that they had to carry on the service with their own money and credit[226], and eventually their condition in respect of funds became 'so exceeding strait' that they could not make proper deliveries[227].
[226] Calendar of State Papers, Domestic, 1671-2, pp. 66, 498.
[227] Calendar of State Papers, Domestic, 1672, p. 484. For other references see pp. 31, 98, 106, 124, 453; and ib. 1673, p. 72.

https://www.gutenberg.org/files/48353/48353-h/483…
Title: Samuel Pepys and the Royal Navy
Author: J. R. (Joseph Robson) Tanner
Release Date: February 24, 2015 [eBook #48353]
Pages 50 and 51

Stephane Chenard  •  Link

The Treasury's minutes (at www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-treasury-books/vol2…), while not recording all these staff changes, mention today that "Sir Ste. Fox is to see Mr. Pepys' warrant (for 17,500L. for Tangier for the quarter ended the 4th inst.) to say if he have any exceptions to it and to examine when the reduction [of the garrison] of Tangier is to begin".

Sandwich on his inspection there had heard many complaints of the military lording it over Tangiers' civilians and merchants like it owned the place, and downsizing the garrison had been part of his recommendations, which are perhaps making their way after all. If so, Sam could be making some enemies, as Sandwich's man and if his fingerprints are on the downsize.

Separately the minutes also note that "Mr. Montague moves for a fund for money for plate for him. The Privy Council to be moved concerning the plate for Ambassadors". Could this be about My Lord Sandwich, an Ambassador currently in some need of plate? But surely they wouldn't write of him as just "Mr. Montague"?

Vincent Telford  •  Link

'that I may not have all I have lie in the King’s hands'

Sam is shrewd enough to realise that his now huge portfolio of wealth needs to be well diversified.

[he's now a roughly a self made sterling pound millionaire at 35 - that is by today's standards according to SDS's link, https://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/9548/]

In these hugely uncertain times he is living in he'd do well to buy some gold - which I believe he has done having 2350l in gold which he move to Woolwich during the fire of London on the 5th September 66 https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1666/09/05/

As pointed out above the chaos caused by the fire of London and the plague provides extra opportunities for Sam.. taking bribes and sexual favours re: 'He could wheel and deal, and so long as the invoices in equalled the money out, who knew the details?' works out extremely well financially for Sam.

Indeed if Sam gets his horses and carriage does that not advertise to the world that Sam is living well above his official salary and so draw suspicion? May be no one who matters real cares - everyone in Sam's new circle is on the make.

Our Sam is in modern terms an extroverted wheeler dealer - interesting that he persists so well with recording the details in this diary - even in the middle of his current huge relationship difficulties with his wife - a real quite introverted activity.

Sam has a very wide ranging personality - he is interested in the detail of reading and diary keeping and his work (I guess no distracting internet and TV then so more time) as well as being a highly sociable animal keen to enjoy a party to the full and engage and sustain a huge circle of friends.

I think Sam, ironically, is actually naturally a very honest person - intelligently wheeler dealing his best in the very uncertain turbulent time and place he happens to have been born within - he is wheeler dealing corrupt - perhaps everyone is around him - but simultaneously genuinely concerned about the state of the nation and in his particular area with the Navy's finances and the Navy's dwindling ability to pay the sailors and supply the ships.

Life was often short and brutish in the past - Sam is keen to experience it to the full while he can.

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

"Mr. Montague moves for a fund for money for plate for him. The Privy Council to be moved concerning the plate for Ambassadors."

Stephane, since these two sentences appear to be looking to the future, I suspect this was Ralph Montagu petitioning for funds to be collected, as he will serve as our Ambassador to the Court of Louis XIV between 1669 and 1678.
https://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/…

Clark Kent  •  Link

Great winds and rain at night, but "the moon shining so bright that it was light." I had until now wondered why Lytton Strachey had felt it necessary to clarify that the stormy night was in fact dark.

john  •  Link

"For it seems they do turn out every servant that belongs to the present Treasurer"
Actions that I have experienced a few times after our small company was acquired.

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

"If Sam gets his horses and carriage does that not advertise to the world that Sam is living well above his official salary and so draw suspicion? May be no one who matters real cares - everyone in Sam's new circle is on the make."

Oh, yes, they did care. I have the impression it was a matter of the degree of influence peddling / excessive gratuities / purchased contracts that mattered. When the elite were ready to impeach someone, all the details would surface. But until then, go forth and do your damndest.

Pepys has been Clerk of the Acts for 8 years now, and while it was good to be humble and ill-dressed at the beginning, when he started needing to be influential in the King's business, he had to dress for success or no one would have taken him seriously.
He is now the longest-serving member of the Navy Board, and an authority on the business end of the war effort. The coach tells his peers that he is ready to take his seat at the "big table".
If he was still slouching around in his 1662 outfits and taking off his hat when addressed by Downing, he couldn't address Parliament.

In our day of billionaires wearing jeans and black turtleneck shirts, this seems ridiculous ... but how else could someone identify who to take seriously?
Queen Elizabeth and other monarchs made rules about what color and types of clothes certain classes of people could wear. There were too many ruffians dressed like noblemen, and the confusion got in the way of the order of things.

I think we can agree Pepys has earned his coach;
if he was paid the correct salary, he'd be getting top pay, and I think he'd welcome not having to do the double bookkeeping to remind himself of an agreement made months before the gratuity rolls in.

I still wonder why the Navy Board didn't have their own stables and a couple of office coaches, just as they had their own rivermen.

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

The volume of Domestic State Papers covering correspondence from Oct. 1668 to Dec. 1669 is at
https://play.google.com/books/reader?id=vik5AQAAM…

@@@
Nov. 11 1668.
Bristol
James Baskerville to Williamson.

I hope the Edgar has arrived at Portsmouth, the winds promising fair.
Part of the fleet that set sail some days after her has put back again.

George Bishop, a captain in the late rebellion, the ringleader or archbishop of the Quakers, was buried at the Quakers' burying ground near Revielitte Church, attended by a more numerous company than I ever saw at a funeral before, most of them of that sect.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 249, No. 61.]

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Nov. 11 1668.
Falmouth
Thos. Holden to Hickes.

The Brothers' Adventure has come from London for Virginia,
the Dartmouth and 2 victuallers for Tangier,
and the Industry of Falmouth from Alicant, laden with fruit; she was chased by 2 or 3 Turkish men-of-war.

I beg for a land waiter's place void in this port.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 249, No. 62.]
===
A landwaiter -- noun
A British customs officer who enforces import-export regulations, collects import duties, etc. -- Dictionary.com

@@@
Nov. 11 1668.
J. Evelyn [Commissioner for sick and wounded mariners] to Williamson.

I have promised you 40 times to do Mr. Smith all the right in my power, but Smith is never satisfied unless he can be his own carver, which cannot be without injury to the other officer.

Smith was employed by a surgeon at Margate, and was to receive his recompense from him, and not from the Commissioners, who could not constitute a new and independent officer, being bound up to certain numbers and places by their instructions.

Smith, not being satisfied with what the surgeon allowed him, appealed to the Commissioners;
as they could not satisfy him, they advised him to submit it to arbitration, which was consented to;
on the determination being sent, the Commissioners gave his former antagonist two orders on the Exchequer, with an injunction to allow Smith to the full of his agreement.

I cannot make out how he now comes to trouble you or clamour against me, who am only one of the Commissioners, after the great pains that have been taken, and the lapse of time that has occurred;
the only thing I can do is to stop the orders in the Exchequer, until our surgeon
at Dover has given him new satisfaction.

This is really hard, after arbitration and a silence of many months about it till now; but as I said, this I will do:
si violandum in jus, violandum est amici causâ, or if you please imperii; for qui
amicum habet, habet imperatorem.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 249, No. 65.]

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

Nov. 11 1668.
The King to the President of the College [of Physicians].

We have chosen Tim. Clarke to succeed the late Dr. Quatremaine as second physician to the royal person, and give you notice thereof, that he may be received into the same place in the college as enjoyed by Dr. Quatremaine.
[S.P. Dom., Entry Book 31, f. 12.]

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

Nov. 11 1668.
Warrant to the Treasury Commissioners
to order the officers of works to open the ground, dig brick, earth, and sand in Richmond Park, and cut stake, furze, and fern to burn the bricks, erecting kilns, &c., that the lodges, walls, and bridges there may be sufficiently repaired.
[S.P. Dom., Entry Book 30, f. 88.]

@@@
Nov. 11 1668.
Warrant to the Duke of Buckingham, Master of the Horse,
to swear in Wm. Legg as page of honour, in place of Sidney Godolphin.
Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 30, f. 88.]

@@@
Nov. 11 1668.
Dublin
Sir George Carteret to the Navy Commissioners.

Though my son James gave his hand to the purser of the Oxford for the whole sum,
the purser only charged him with 142/., and acknowledges by his account that all the rest was employed by himself in victualling the frigate at Gottenburg.

Providing care be taken to discharge my son, I am realy, on the first notice, to pay the money either here or in London.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 249, No. 66.]

@@@
Nov. 11 1668.
Certificate by Wm. Sheldon
that John Bateman of Woolwich, seaman, is fit to officiate in the absence of the purser of the Centurion.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 249, No. 67.]

@@@
Nov. 11 1668.
Harwich
Certificate by Commissioner John Taylor,
that John Gregory, late clerk of the cheque at the yard at Harwich,
had the same rooms in which Mr. Homewood executed the office,
and that he had no other all the time he was in that service.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 249, No. 68.]

Annexing,
Memorandum that John Gregory served as clerk of the cheque from 15 May 1666, to 31 March 1668,
for which time he prays an allowance of 8/. a year for house rent, according to his Royal Highness' order, upon appointing the execution of the clerk of the cheque and the clerk of the survey's duties by two distinct persons, with the allowance of 50/. a year, and 8/. for house rent, to the former, and 40/., with 8/. house rent, to the latter;

but Gregory lodged in his office in the yard, undergoing many inconveniences by the straitness of the office, to save the allowance of house rent, so as to make his salary better able to support him;
he had no more office room than his predecessors, except one room ordered to be built, but not yet finished.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 249, No. 681.]

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

Nov. 11 1668.
M. Wren to the Navy Commissioners.

I shall know certainly in a day or two the time when the Earl of Carlisle must go;
if it happens that he must make haste, the paying of the Mary Rose's company would perhaps be a cause that he might stay for the ship;
this his Royal Highness desires to prevent, and thinks the continuation of the growing charge must be submitted to, till there be a certainty of the Earl's voyage.

The King having resolved to send a ship to fetch the Prince of Tuscany from Spain, his Royal Highness believes that Portsmouth will be the most convenient place for her to sail from,
but does not think fit to send one bigger than a fourth-rate.

Which of 3 named do you judge most proper for the voyage??
I have notice that the Elgar has arrived safe at Spithead.
There will be money requisite for paying her off there.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 249, No. 69.]

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