Annotations and comments

Timo has posted 35 annotations/comments since 15 September 2014.

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About Tuesday 9 July 1667

Timo  •  Link

Agreed Marquess. The Crown is really on the back foot here. Quivering as the Dutch fleet heaves in to Dover

About Friday 28 June 1667

Timo  •  Link

defluxions.
According to https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/deflux…
Definition of defluxion
1 : DOWNFLOW
2 obsolete
a : a flowing down of fluid matter (as a copious discharge from the nose in catarrh)
b : INFLAMMATION
c : sudden loss of hair

I’m surprised no one queried this. First time I’ve heard the word used. Presumably 2.a in this case.

About Wednesday 26 June 1667

Timo  •  Link

This is one of those entries where I feel Pepys is conscious of his role as a chronicler of his times. Not just reporting on touching up one of the maids...

About Saturday 15 June 1667

Timo  •  Link

Thanks as always for your insight Sarah. I must have been a very uncomfortable negotiating position for the English delegation when the magnitude of the disaster began filtering back to them. Sneaky Dutchies! ( I know that because I married one 😉)

About Saturday 15 June 1667

Timo  •  Link

Does anyone know the whereabouts of the delegation for the peace talks or the status of their negotiations during this moment of treachery (oportunism?) by de Ruyter? Was the Admiraal acting as a free agent?

About Thursday 23 May 1667

Timo  •  Link

When I began reading this diary I was expecting to get to grips with the political history of London. I had no idea we’d be getting so down and dirty with our randy little hero. It’s fascinating... Despite Roger Gertz’ frequent and stirring defences of Pepys’, frankly rather boring, wife, it seems abundantly clear to me that his marriage is lacking in something essential. I know many readers here find his activities unacceptable, but It really is no different from the way many people carry on in our world today. Except perhaps his candour.

About Thursday 23 May 1667

Timo  •  Link

Gerald, my first impression was that Mrs Daniels probably knew perfectly well what she was letting herself in for but was most likely resistant to being caught by his wife.

About Saturday 11 May 1667

Timo  •  Link

Ibiza Sarah. Sure the numbers are not the same as Pepys’ time, but the feelings have been very similar. Especially the uncertainty at the start - we have been effectively cut off from the rest of the world for 8 weeks with all ports closed and separated from close family. Luckily we have a greater understanding of pathogens nowadays and decent universal healthcare behind us. Well some of us at least...

About Saturday 11 May 1667

Timo  •  Link

When I first began to read this diary 7 years ago the part I most looked forward to was the Great Plague. To get an insight into what it might be like to live through a pandemic was fascinating to me, little knowing that we would one day live to experience anything similar. Yet here we are... Today marks an important turning point - after 8 weeks of solid lockdown in Spain (and I mean solid, unlike most other countries), constantly checking the local parish records of infections and deaths, we have finally been allowed out to enjoy a beer in the sunshine. Luckily I live on a small island, isolated from the worst effects of the coronavirus where the mortality rate has been low, due almost entirely to strict observance of social distancing regulations. Nevertheless, today was a good day. Let us all hope there are many more to come for all of our sakes and especially for my fellow followers of Pepys.

About Saturday 27 April 1667

Timo  •  Link

Terry, Pepys seems to only ever use doubt to mean suspect. If that was common usage at the time, do you remember if any of the linguists on here ever alluded to when a shift in meaning occurred?

About Friday 26 April 1667

Timo  •  Link

Very good point TW. Although whether Pepys’ words, at the moment of writing, were for a future audience is still open to debate.

Thanks for the tip Terry

About Friday 26 April 1667

Timo  •  Link

I cant believe you just wrote this Scube. I was about to write exactly the same. It must be the longest so far.

About Thursday 4 April 1667

Timo  •  Link

Besides the poor meal, I find the dinner with the Moncks to be one of the funniest scenes described so far in the diary. Amongst other gems: the nasty wife, tales of the hapless Du Pell shooting up his own ships, the arse-kisser-in- chief Colonel Howard comparing Albermarl’s exploits to those of Caesar, Monck playing down said feats as just the coincidence of being called back to station, but still managing to get a dig of sabre rattling in for the old Frenchies for good measure. You couldn’t make this stuff up, which is probably why Gertz was uncharacteristically taciturn today.

About Friday 29 March 1667

Timo  •  Link

Very funny D and J, you both echoed my own thoughts.

There is little point morally judging Pepys actions and character 350 years later - Just sit back and enjoy the entertainment. It’s far more interesting than any modern soap opera. Clearly Pepys relationship with Elizabeth fails to stimulate him at this stage of his life and yet he does seem genuinely to be in love with Betty Mitchell. It happens in many marriages then and now. (But luckily not mine Dorothy )

About Monday 25 February 1666/67

Timo  •  Link

Charles II silver "Peace of Breda" Medal currently changing hands for about £1100 on the coin market

About Sunday 23 December 1666

Timo  •  Link

In his defence, Sam does seem to have thrown in the towel on his sexless marriage. It seems like an age since he did anything more intimate with his wife than ‘lie long in bed catting’. Men in their prime have needs and he is clearly trying to get whatever he can, wherever he can. He does seem to be off the leash but I suppose divorce in those times was not really an option.

Happy Christmas to all the annotators who are keeping this second round alive. Especially Sarah for her excellent insights.

About Tuesday 27 November 1666

Timo  •  Link

Despite much discussion of the increasing tax burden, I cannot recall our tight-fisted hero having ever complained about how it affects him directly. Which begs the question, how much he personally contributes to the war effort?