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john has posted 211 annotations/comments since 14 March 2013.

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About Monday 27 May 1667

john  •  Link

"It was pleasant to see".
The following from the OED probably applies.

pleasant, a.
[...]
A. adj.
†4. Amusing, laughable, ridiculous, funny. Obs.

   1583 T. Stocker Civ. Warres Lowe C. i. 15 With such other like pleasant iestes.    1604 E. G[rimstone] D'Acosta's Hist. Indies i. xiv. 47 From our Peru‥they might well bring gold, silver, and pleasant monkies.    1688 S. Penton Guard. Instruct. (1897) 43 It was pleasant to see how my Son trembled to see the Proctour come in. [...]

Reading this, I recalled his anger at the maids letting in Watermen.

About Friday 24 May 1667

john  •  Link

With the help of the Devil? People would say the same 150y later of Paganini.

About Tuesday 21 May 1667

john  •  Link

Mrs Turner is probably a useful source of information, at least to know what "the street" is thinking.

Interesting that Carcasse's fraud did not seem to financially benefit Brouncker.

About Saturday 18 May 1667

john  •  Link

Luce seems to have had an alcohol problem. Back then, as now, alcohol problems tend to be dismissed and not regarded as a debilitating addiction.

About Luce (Pepys' cookmaid)

john  •  Link

Not actually dismissed but quit according to the entry of 18 May 1667: "and so put up some of her things and did go away of her accord, nobody pressing her to it"

About Tuesday 14 May 1667

john  •  Link

"there with Mr. Fist, Sir W. Batten’s clerk, who writes mighty well, writing over our report in Mr. Carcasses business,"

An interesting note here in the days when writing instruments were pens wielded by people. The report was substantial and took some time to write out (and Pepys still made corrections after all had signed it).

About Sunday 12 May 1667

john  •  Link

This business of white locks mystifies me (on which L&M are silent). Pepys reacted so strongly but Elizabeth did not foresee a problem, though certainly turned it to her advantage. (And note that his threats were not enough to preclude her using them as a bargaining tool.) What was the problem with white locks -- improper imitation, unsuitable hair adornment, something from his past?

About Sunday 5 May 1667

john  •  Link

"that there are some courtiers that have made a knot to buy them, in hopes of some ways to get money of the King to pay them"

A vicious cabal, indeed!

About Friday 3 May 1667

john  •  Link

Methinks that if Betty Mitchell was indeed missing nipples, it would have been noted earlier by Pepys. Without evidence, I wonder whether it is an expression meaning "without milk" (as some have guessed).

About Friday 12 April 1667

john  •  Link

Commentators so quick to condemn Pepys should note that being cuffed about the head for infractions was not so rare when some of us were children. (o mores)

About Monday 25 March 1667

john  •  Link

jeannine wrote: "There is nothing as difficult as being with someone you love as they pass on, [..,]"

Indeed, a friend is in palliative care (expected to be gone in 2 weeks); only his wife is allowed to see him and then only rarely.

About Monday 25 March 1667

john  •  Link

"[...] forsooth, neither of them being dressed, which I was almost ashamed of."

To see and not be seen. (My wife will never let me go out in my farm clothes, mind.)

About Wednesday 27 February 1666/67

john  •  Link

[...] and nothing said all dinner, but only his mother would say, “It’s good broth, son.” He would answer, “Yes, it is good broth.” Then, says his lady, Confirm all, and say, “Yes, very good broth.” By and by she would begin and say, “Good pork:” — “Yes,” says the mother, “good pork.” Then he cries, “Yes, very good pork.” And so they said of all things; to which nobody made any answer, [...]

A wonderful hilarious description, having supped thusly a few times at relatives, and so accurate.

About Monday 25 February 1666/67

john  •  Link

Every couple starting from poor or "mean" circumstances has such conversations during their lives. I can certainly identify with this.

About Saturday 23 February 1666/67

john  •  Link

Never a mention in the diary of celebrating the anniversary of anyone's birth (excepting the king). I found some (undocumented) assertions that celebrating "common" birthdates began in the 19th century.

About Wednesday 13 February 1666/67

john  •  Link

SDS: Well, they gave us (blunt) swords and told us to follow the others. (I could ride so at least that part was under control, though my first experience with military saddles.) Swords were held upright with the hilt resting on a leg, held upright by careful placement of the little finger that caused a callus to form over time. Riding in formation was the most difficult part, actually. I was very glad that the horses knew what to do.

About Wednesday 13 February 1666/67

john  •  Link

"I rid with my sword drawn in the coach."
Is there any record of Pepys having learnt swordplay? I wonder whether he had it on his lap or visibly upright and I wonder how sharp it was. (I am reminded of my stint in the GGHG Reserve, where I learnt to canter with drawn sword without lopping off my nose or the horse's ears.)