Annotations and comments

john has posted 259 annotations/comments since 14 March 2013.

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About Tuesday 22 October 1667

john  •  Link

"None of my brethren said anything but me there" -- It appears that Pepys was the correct choice as spokesman, as Robert observed, assuming no "back blows".

About Thursday 10 October 1667

john  •  Link

I wonder if Pepys ever saw the humour of this. Certainly, I can understand his consternation at the time. It is also surprising that the bags were not dug up by a dog or somesuch.

About Friday 27 September 1667

john  •  Link

"my wife sends for me to come home" -- summons obeyed; their marriage was more egalitarian than some would believe.

About Thursday 26 September 1667

john  •  Link

L&M offer the following: "Pepys's 'varnished things' were papers marked out with arithmetic tables"

About Monday 23 September 1667

john  •  Link

I confess to being unclear why drinking to the Duke of York's health was to be kept quiet. The brothers drank and made up. Why was the king bothered afterwards?

About Thursday 19 September 1667

john  •  Link

I think that L.K. inadvertantly proves Paul Chapin's point. Pepys is an excellent administrator who has reached his standing by hard and diligent work. Yet L.K. denigrates him by calling him an "upstart". For all his naval knowledge and administrative skill, he is employed at pleasure and being seen with the "wrong" people would jeopardise that.

About Monday 16 September 1667

john  •  Link

A belated note to the "painted lady". L&M note that "Mrs Pearse was described in 1678 as having a complexion 'florid and pure red without paint'." Whether a birthmark of a bad case of rosacea is unknown but seems to explain the heavy make-up.

About Monday 16 September 1667

john  •  Link

"sluttish dinner"
Meanings change over time, Nicolas.

From the OED:
sluttish, a.
2. Of things: Unclean, dirty, grimy; untidy.
   1549 Coverdale, etc. Erasm. Par. 2 Tim. 23 In sluttishe clothes, with a countrefaicte grauitie of countenaunce,‥they conueye them selues in to other mens houses.    1553 Respublica iii. vi. 853 Suche hongrye doggs will slabbe vp sluttishe puddinges.    1599 Davies Immort. Soul Introd. xxxiii. (1714) 9 The Man loves least at Home to be, That hath a sluttish House.    1617 Moryson Itin. iii. 180 Their wives‥are attired in a sluttish gowne.    1665 Sir T. Herbert Trav. (1677) 311 Some boil the cream in a raw skin, so as it is commonly very sluttish, full of hairs and unsalted. [...]

About Monday 9 September 1667

john  •  Link

"where I stood a good while all alone among the bulls, and was afeard I was among the bears, too"

Well, unless the bulls were tied up in stalls, I would not care to stand amongst the bulls, either.

About Sunday 8 September 1667

john  •  Link

From the OED:

compound, v.
II. To compose differences, settle claims.
(intr.)
10. to agree, make terms, bargain, contract (with, for). Also with indirect passive. Obs.

[A slew of similar meanings, all marked obsolete.]

About Saturday 7 September 1667

john  •  Link

L&M saw fit to include "trill" in the diary volume's local vocabulary (with the same meaning as today). I would not have thought trill to be uncommon.

About Sunday 1 September 1667

john  •  Link

Elizabeth bought the cuffs and expected Pepys to pay for them. She knows him more than he realizes.

About Sunday 1 September 1667

john  •  Link

Methinks that "little Michell" was used as a term of endearment (below from the OED) and not to belittle. Until recently, the phrase "the little woman" was used to denote a wife without belittlement.

3. Used to convey an implication of endearment or depreciation, or of tender feeling on the part of the speaker. Also coupled with an epithet expressing such feelings, e.g. pretty, sweet little.
1567 Satir. Poems Reform. iii. 154 The wois that Ouid in Ibin Into his pretty lytill buik did wryte.    1590 Shakes. Mids. N. iii. i. 204 And when she weepes, weepe euerie little flower.    1596 ― Merch. V. v. i. 21 In such a night Did pretty Iessica (like a little shrow) Slander her Loue.    1597 ― 2 Hen. IV, ii. iv. 225, I prethee Iack be quiet, the Rascall is gone: ah, you whorson little valiant Villaine, you.    1694 Wood Life 23 June, I returned from London in the company of a little poore thing, Sir Lacy Osbaldeston.    1819 Shelley Cyclops 246 My dear sweet master, My darling little Cyclops. [...]

About Thursday 29 August 1667

john  •  Link

"find how the mistake arose, by the ill copying of it out"
One wonders how often this happened.

About Thursday 22 August 1667

john  •  Link

"so that we are forced only to make a show of severity by keeping them in prison, but are unable to punish them."

The good side of Pepys here. I presume that punishment here refers to corporal punishment.