Wednesday 9 September 1668

Up, and to the office, and thence to the Duke of Richmond’s lodgings by his desire, by letter, yesterday. I find him at his lodgings in the little building in the bowling-green, at White Hall, that was begun to be built by Captain Rolt. They are fine rooms. I did hope to see his lady, the beautiful Mrs. Stuart, but she, I hear, is in the country. His business was about his yacht, and he seems a mighty good-natured man, and did presently write me a warrant for a doe from Cobham, when the season comes, bucks season being past. I shall make much of this acquaintance, that I may live to see his lady near. Thence to Westminster, to Sir R. Longs Office: and, going, met Mr. George Montagu, who talked and complimented me mightily; and long discourse I had with him, who, for news, tells me for certain that Trevor do come to be Secretary at Michaelmas, and that Morrice goes out, and he believes, without any compensation. He tells me that now Buckingham does rule all; and the other day, in the King’s journey he is now on, at Bagshot, and that way, he caused Prince Rupert’s horses to be turned out of an inne, and caused his own to be kept there, which the Prince complained of to the King, and the Duke of York seconded the complaint; but the King did over-rule it for Buckingham, by which there are high displeasures among them; and Buckingham and Arlington rule all. Thence by water home and to dinner, and after dinner by water again to White Hall, where Brouncker, W. Pen, and I attended the Commissioners of the Treasury about the victualling-contract, where high words between Sir Thomas Clifford and us, and myself more particularly, who told him that something, that he said was told him about this business, was a flat untruth. However, we went on to our business in, the examination of the draught, and so parted, and I vexed at what happened, and Brouncker and W. Pen and I home in a hackney coach. And I all that night so vexed that I did not sleep almost all night, which shows how unfit I am for trouble. So, after a little supper, vexed, and spending a little time melancholy in making a base to the Lark’s song, I to bed.


16 Annotations

Paul Chapin  •  Link

"how unfit I am for trouble"
This surprises me. Sam reports arguments with colleagues and others all the time, and doesn't seem to lose any sleep over them. Wonder why this spat with Clifford affected him so strongly.

Mary  •  Link

We have also seen several recent instances of Pepys seriously contemplating retirement from official service and retreat to the country. This may be just another one of those moments in which he shows us himself making mental preparations for such a move.

(But not, perhaps, before he has had a chance to see La Belle Stuart at closer quarters.)

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Cobham

Where might be the prospect for a passel of venison pasties for the Pepys's?!

--

Phil Gyford  •  Link

Thanks Mary - I've fixed the 'Cobham' link.

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Thomas Clifford died by his own hand (perhaps "strangled with his cravatt upon the bed-tester") a few months after his retirement. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Clifford,_1s…

The dramatic description of how he died is Evelyn's report: https://books.google.com/books?id=7mcLAAAAYAAJ&pg…

A tester is a canopy, and tester beds, or 'testers' A are popularly known as four-posters. despite having only two free-standing posts, the head posts being the headboard uprights. A development of earlier couch and wainscot beds, and of medieval half-testers, these were the most impressive beds of the 16th and 17thC, challenged only by 'French beds' (fashionable about I 650.1700) which were completely covered in rich upholstery (and hardly any of which have survived). http://www.cilss.org/antique-furniture/tester-bed…

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"the other day, in the King’s journey"

L&M explain: The King, the Duke of York, Rupert and others of the court had been away since Septermber 3 hunting in Windsor Forest and the New Gorest. They returned on the 10th. London Gazette, 7 September....

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"we went on to our business in, the examination of the draught, and so parted, and I vexed at what happened"

L&M report this from the Treasury minute: 'My Lords [of the Treasury] say to the Commissioners [of the Navy] that they did not give notice to the proposers [the contractors about to make tenders]. Mr. Pepys says that they [the proposers] desires themselves that the matters should be drawn up by the Navy Commissioners. Mr. Child says that the matters are drawn up worse than before [i.e. worse tha in the first draft of the contract] and wholly impracticable. The victualing debate adjourned until tomorrow.' CTB, ii.435.

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"Mr. George Montagu...tells me for certain that Trevor do come to be Secretary at Michaelmas, and that Morrice goes out, and he believes, without any compensation."

Not quite, L&M say: John Trevor, appointed on 22 September, did in fact pay £8000 to Motice for the office: CSPD 1667-8, p. 595; Bulstrode Papers, i.61.

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"Up, and to the office, and thence to the Duke of Richmond’s lodgings by his desire, by letter, yesterday. I find him at his lodgings in the little building in the bowling-green, at White Hall, that was begun to be built by Captain Rolt."

L&M: Edward Rolt had been a Gentleman of the Bedchamber to Oliver Cromwell. The building has not been identified.

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

The volume covering correspondence from November 1667 through September 1668, is at
https://play.google.com/books/reader?id=gCk5AQAAM…
PAGE 624-625

There is a lot of correspondence today.

If you're into the Levant Company, they sent instructions to a number of their North African agents ... they were all different, but incorporated versions of the following:

Levant Company to Rich. Langley (treasurer at Smyrna).

We complain of the infrequency of your accounts, and of a charge of 3,600 dollars on the company not explained;
you must send accounts every 6 months, and oftener if you require to draw
money.
We approve of your care of Consul Cave's chamber and warehouse on his
decease, and the frugality of your disbursements, but refuse to allow the charge for feasting, or half the rent of the Consul's house;
we wish your accounts to be audited in future.

The factors are to sell only for weighty money, to prevent the inundation of false money sent home.
All consulage is paid except Capt. Woodgreen's in 1663.
Consul Cave's funeral is to be charge: l on his own estate, and also 1,163 dollars excepted against in his accounts.
Mr. Mowse's executors say that part of this money was extorted from him by the late Consul, in which case it must be repaid.
We will not admit the Ambassador's claim to an interest in the consulage of goods on strangers' ships coming under English protection; and we shall not allow in future foreign ships to come under English protection.
The loss of the Leghorn vessel in the Turks' service must be compensated for by yourself or the Consul, who encouraged her to wear English colours, if mischief should happen.
Your manifest about the Ann and Christopher should have given the marks of the goods, so as to distinguish whether she has paid consulage.
Orders about duties to be levied on particular factors;
2 dollars per cloth is to be levied on the company's goods, and 20 per cent. on those of interlopers or other unfree men.
Benj. Whetcombe, a member of the company, is allowed to send 40 per petuanies to Smyrna if they remain unsold, provided consulage has been paid.
[S.P. Foreign, Levant Co. 5, pp. 194-8.]

@@@
Sept. 8. 1668
Capt. John Wettwang to Col. Middleton, Navy Surveyor.
Bristol.

Particulars of the fitting of (the Edgar).
Has taken the guns into the hold instead of ballast, and discharged the ship that brought them.
Is much straitened for men, and wishes those from Portsmouth were come;
Has much trouble to get things done, having to give brandy and strong beer, and sometimes drinking money, and if he has not allowance for it, shall be a great loser; is 80/. out already;
hopes he may be thought on.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 246, No. 1.]

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

Sept. 8. 1668
Will. Hannam, master attendant, to the Navy Commissioners
Woolwich.

I mustered with Mr. Sheldon, and found but 2 boys aboard the Foresight,
one aboard the Centurion,
and upon the Jersey there was neither man nor boy.
This bad attendance of officers and ordinary gives opportunity to steal;

on the Jersey the gunner's servant broke open the carpenter's storeroom and stole 2 cwt of iron, but the boatswain of the Falcon meeting with it, took it again, and the man ran away and hides himself.
I desire your order in case I meet with him.

There are 60 men in ordinary, but I never receive help from them, although there is a great deal to do in setting and taking out masts.

The purser of the Dover makes no way to clear the ship of empty casks, so as to come at the ballast to lighten her;
she grounds every spring (tide), and yet only draws 14 feet of water.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 246, No. 2.]

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Sept. 8. 1668
Joshua Child and Thos. Papillon to Sam. Pepys.

Ask leave for the bearer to take a copy of the contract for victualling the Navy,
and for some of the clerks to direct him in the amendments, to put
everything in its right place.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 246, No. 3.]

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Sept. 8. 1668
Duke of Richmond and Lenox to Sam. Pepys.
Whitehall

Thanks for giving Captain Holmes despatch;
I wish to speak with you at my lodgings tomorrow at 9 o'clock.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 246, No. 4.]
---
Charles Stewart, Duke of Richmond and Lenox was the person sent to arrange James, Duke of York's recent investature as Lord of the Cinque Ports at Dover. I wonder what "observations" he has for Pepys.

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

OOOOppps. Sorry, these should have all gone yesterday ... whis is why Pepys didn't miss his 9 a.m. meeting this morning.

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

For Sept. 9, 1668 correspondence:
The volume covering correspondence from November 1667 through September 1668, is at
https://play.google.com/books/reader?id=gCk5AQAAM…
PAGES 626-627

Sept. 9. 1668
Capt. John Wettwang to the Navy Commissioners.
Bristol

Mr. Baylie goes on pretty well with his work, so I hope the Edgar will be in a condition to go into King Road in 14 days.

I shall have all the guns out of the flyboat today, and discharge her.

I wish the 100 men from Portsmouth were here;
I could do well with 20 more, and hope you will send good men, as in the other 5 there were but 2 seamen.
I have 83 upon the ship, but besides the officers, there are but 10 able seamen.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 246, No. 12.]

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Sept. 9. 1668
Daniel Furzer to the Navy Commissioners.
Beachey

Sends account of work to be performed on the Edgar.
Has not had time to transcribe it, so sends it as taken aboard;
it might as well have been sent by the same hand that sent the complaint.

Knows no reason for backwardness except that the builder was dubious whether some things were his work or not;
this should be judged by the contract.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 246, No. 13.]

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

"... Brouncker and W. Pen and I home in a hackney coach."

I'm amazed nothing vexed Pepys in this ride home. Or was it a stoney silence all the way?

Pepys is getting vexed a lot these days.

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