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Bill has posted 2,770 annotations/comments since 9 March 2013.

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About Saturday 29 October 1664

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"it being my Lord Mayor’s show, my boy and three mayds went out"

The King and Queen were present at the banquet. The Intelligencer, 31st Oct., 1664.
---Diary and correspondence of Samuel Pepys, the diary deciphered by J. Smith. 1854.

About Robert Foley

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Thomas Foley, afterwards of Witley Court. He was the grandfather of the first Lord Foley, and died on the 1st October, 1677, aged 59. His portrait is engraved in Nash's History of Worchestershire.
Thomas Foley, afterwards of Witley Court. He was the grandfather of the first Lord Foley, and died on the 1st October, 1677, aged 59. His portrait is engraved in Nash's History of Worchestershire.

---Diary and correspondence of Samuel Pepys, the diary deciphered by J. Smith. 1854

An update to the URL above for the Foley family: https://htt.herefordshire.gov.uk/herefordshires-p…
---Diary and correspondence of Samuel Pepys, the diary deciphered by J. Smith. 1854.

About Katherine Boynton

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Daughter of Matthew, second son to Sir Matthew Boynton, Bart., of Barnston, Yorkshire. She became the first wife of Richard Talbot, afterwards Duke of Tyrconnel.

---Diary and correspondence of Samuel Pepys, the diary deciphered by J. Smith. 1854.

About Sir John Duncombe (MP Bury St Edmunds)

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Sir John Duncombe was the son of Sir Edward Duncombe of Battlesden. He was knighted by Charles I. while the king was a prisoner at Carisbrooke Castle. He was M.P. for Bury St. Edmunds in the parliaments of 166o and 1661, and was appointed a Commissioner of the Treasury in 1667. In 1672 he became, on the resignation of Ashley, Chancellor of the Exchequer. Burnet describes him as "a judicious man, but very haughty, and apt to raise enemies. He was an able Parliament man, but could not go into all the designs of the Court; for he had a sense of religion and a zeal for the liberty of his country" ("Own Time," vol. i., p. 437, ed. 1833).
--- Wheatley. Diary, 1904.

About Saturday 5 November 1664

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"so with my wife to the Duke’s house to a play, “Macbeth,” a pretty good play"

This was Sir William Davenant's alteration of Shakespeare's play, which was described by Downes "as being in the nature of an opera." Malone says that it was first acted in 1663. It was not printed until 1673
--- Wheatley. Diary, 1904.

About Philip Herbert (5th Earl of Pembroke)

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HERBERT, PHILIP, fifth Earl Of Pembroke (1619-1669), eldest surviving son of Philip Herbert, fourth earl of Pembroke; M.P., Glamorgan, in Long parliament; succeeded to his father's seat for Berkshire, 1650; president of council of state (June, July), 1652; councillor for trade and navigation, 1660; sold Wilton collections.
---Dictionary of National Biography: Index and Epitome, 1903

About Thomas Fuller (a)

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FULLER or FULWAR, THOMAS (1593-1667), archbishop of Cashel, related to Thomas Fuller (1608-1661); disinherited 'for a prodigal'; went to Ireland; bishop of Ardfert, 1641; D.D. Oxford, 1645; archbishop of Cashel, 1661-7.
---Dictionary of National Biography: Index and Epitome, 1903

About Edward Cocker

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COCKER, EDWARD (1631-1675), arithmetician; taught writing and arithmetic in London from before 1657 to 1665; a book-collector; published twenty-three manuals of penmanship, 1657-75; published his arithmetic, 1664, which afterwards went through more than a hundred editions; published verses, 1670,1675.
---Dictionary of National Biography: Index and Epitome, 1903

About Wednesday 26 October 1664

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"Here I staid above with them while the ship was launched"

On this day there was a meeting of the Royal Society, but the "greatest part of the members were absent, being gone to Woolwich, together with the King and Council and most of the Court, to see the great ship St. Catharine launched" (Birch's "History of the Royal Society," vol. i., p. 477, note).
--- Wheatley. Diary, 1904.

About William Cecil (2nd Earl of Salisbury)

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William Cecil, second Earl of Salisbury, K.G., who took the side of the Parliament during the Civil Wars. He died December 3rd, 1668, aged seventy-seven. See his character, "despicable to all men," drawn by Lord Clarendon, "History of the Rebellion," book vi., ed. Macray, 1888, vol. ii., p. 542.
--- Wheatley. Diary, 1904.

About Monday 3 October 1664

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many bodies else = many bodies before/already

ELSE. otherwise; before, already.
---N. Bailey. An universal etymological English dictionary, 1734

About Jeremiah White

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WHITE, JEREMIAH (1629-1707), chaplain to Cromwell; B.A. Trinity College, Cambridge, 1649; M.A., 1653; domestic chaplain and preacher to council of state; left religious writings, published posthumously; wrote account of sufferings of dissenters after Restoration, not known to be extant.
---Dictionary of National Biography: Index and Epitome, 1903

About Sir Thomas Clifford (MP Totnes, Devon, Comptroller and Treasurer of the Household, Treasury Commissioner)

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CLIFFORD, THOMAS, first Baron Clifford Of Chudleigh (1630-1673), of Ugbrooke, Devonshire; a concealed Romanist entered Exeter College, Oxford, 1647, and the Middle Temple, 1648; travelled; M.P., Totnes, 1660-72; joined court party, 1663; a commissioner for the care of the sick and wounded, 1664; a trustee for the Duke of Monmouth, 1665; knighted; a confidant of Arlington; envoy to Denmark, 1665; served at sea, 1665-6; comptroller (1666), and treasurer (1668) of the household; cognisant of Charles II's wishes to establish Roman Catholicism in England, 1669; intrigued in France against the triple alliance, 1669; privy to secret clauses of treaty of Dover, December, 1670; granted estates by Charles II, 1671; acting secretary of state, 1672; advised the suspension of exchequer payments, and the Declaration of Indulgence, 1672; created Baron Clifford, 1672; lord high treasurer, 1672; resigned under the Test Act, 1673.
---Dictionary of National Biography: Index and Epitome, 1903

About Sir Thomas Clifford (MP Totnes, Devon, Comptroller and Treasurer of the Household, Treasury Commissioner)

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Thomas Clifford, born at Ugbrooke, Devon, August 1st, 1630, and educated at Exeter College, Oxford. He attended Charles II. in exile, and represented Totnes in the Convention Parliament and in that of 1661. He was knighted as a reward for the delivery of several speeches on behalf of the royal prerogative. After having distinguished himself at sea and acting as Envoy Extraordinary to the courts of Denmark and Sweden, he was, on November 8th, 1666, made Comptroller of the Household, and on December 5th he was sworn of the Privy Council. In 1672 he was made Secretary of State, on April 22nd created Baron Clifford, and in November raised to the post of Lord High Treasurer, which he held till June, 1673. Died September, 1673, in the forty-fourth year of his age.
--- Wheatley. Diary, 1904.

About All Hallows Church, Barking

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Allhallows Barking, a church at the east end of Great Tower Street, in the ward of that name, dedicated to Allhallows and St. Mary, said to be "the most complete mediaeval church remaining in London." The distinguishing title of Barking was appended thereto by the Abbess and Convent of Barking, in Essex, to whom the vicarage originally belonged. Richard I. added a chapel to the building, and Edward I. a statute of "Our Lady of Barking" to the treasures of the church. Richard III. rebuilt the chapel, and founded a college of priests, suppressed and pulled down in the 2d of Edward VI. It is 180 feet long, 67 wide, and 35 high; the tower (rebuilt 1659) rises about 80 feet from the ground. The whole building had a narrow escape at the Great Fire, for, as Pepys records, the dial and porch were burnt, and the fire there quenched. This church, from its near neighbourhood to the Tower, was a ready receptacle for the remains of those who fell on the scaffold on Tower Hill. The headless bodies of Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey (the poet), Bishop Fisher, and Archbishop Laud were buried here, but have been long since removed. The body of Fisher was carried on the halberds of the attendants and buried in the churchyard. Laud's body was removed after the Restoration to the chapel of St. John's College, Oxford.
---Wheatley. London, Past and Present, 1891.

About Henry Oldenburg

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OLDENBURG, HENRY (1615?-1677), first secretary of the Royal Society; born and educated at Bremen; lived in England, 1640-8; agent of Bremen in England, 1653; made the acquaintance of Milton, 1654, and of Robert Boyle while studying at Oxford, 1656-7; travelled as tutor to Richard Jones (Lord Ranelagh), 1657-60; first secretary of the Royal Society, 1663-77; published and edited the 'Transactions' of the society, 1664-77 ; corresponded with Spinoza; imprisoned on account of political correspondence, 1667; undertook many translations; Huyghens's watch patent assigned to him.
---Dictionary of National Biography: Index and Epitome, 1903