Annotations and comments

Bill has posted 2,770 annotations/comments since 9 March 2013.

Comments

About Saturday 4 June 1664

Bill  •  Link

Martin, I guess the 1684 dictionary quoted above was a little ahead of its time. And, of course, Sam might not have wanted to use a circumflex in his encoding.

About Sunday 5 June 1664

Bill  •  Link

“she is taken with great gripings”

The GRIPES, a wringing or twisting of the Bowels
---An universal etymological English dictionary. N. Bailey, 1724.

About Gen. Robert Blake

Bill  •  Link

BLAKE, ROBERT (1599-1657), admiral and general at sea; entered St. Alban Hall, Oxford, 1615; removed to Wadham College; graduated; engaged in business of merchant; M.P. for Bridgwater, 1640 and 1645; took part in defence of Bristol against royalists, 1643; lieutenant-colonel of Popham's regiment; held Lyme against royalists, 1643-4; took, and held, Taunton, 1644-5; governor of Taunton, 1645; appointed admiral and general at sea, 1649; unsuccessfully blockaded Prince Rupert at Kinsale, 1649, and pursued him to Portugal, 1650; blockaded mouth of Tagus, 1650, and subsequently followed Rupert to Mediterranean and destroyed many of his ships; commanded squadron in Irish Sea, and reduced Scilly Islands, which were held by royalist privateers, 1651; assisted in reduction of Jersey, 1651; member of council of state, 1651-2; with Rear-admiral Bourne, defeated Dutch under Tromp in Downs. 1652; defeated De Witt and De Ruyter off mouth of Thames, and, later, was defeated by Tromp off Dungeness, 1652; in company with Deane, Monck, and Penn, fought indecisive battle with Tromp off Portsmouth, 1653, the advantage being slightly with the English; took part in battle of 3 June, 1653; engaged in admiralty business at London, and executive duties at Portsmouth; destroyed Turkish pirate fleet at Porto Farina, 1655; destroyed Spanish West Indian fleet at Santa Cruz, 1657; died of fever while returning to England. His body was buried in Westminster Abbey, but removed after Restoration.
---Dictionary of National Biography: Index and Epitome. S. Lee, 1906.

About Friday 3 June 1664

Bill  •  Link

"At the Committee for Tangier all the afternoon, where a sad consideration to see things of so great weight managed in so confused a manner as it is, so as I would not have the buying of an acre of land bought by the Duke of York and Mr. Coventry, for ought I see, being the only two that do anything like men."

Here's my take. The Duke and Coventry are members of the Committee for Tangier, so this sentence is NOT a compare and contrast of them with the Committee. What SP is saying is that he "would not have the buying of an acre of land" even if recommended by these two otherwise competent men. (Note that as a member of the Committee the Duke can indeed buy land, just not for himself.)

About Friday 3 June 1664

Bill  •  Link

Terry F on 4 Jun 2007:

"for aught I see" have L&M

Pepys's spell-Czech is working, getting copy ready for Dr. Johnson.
--------

Not quite:

AUGHT, anything.
OUGHT, somewhat.
---An universal etymological English dictionary. N. Bailey, 1724.

AUGHT, Any thing.
OUGHT, Any thing, not nothing.
---A Dictionary Of The English Language. Samuel Johnson, 1756.

Definition of aught
1. anything
2. all, everything, for aught I care, for aught we know.

ought, archaic spelling of aught.
---Merriam-Webster. 2017.

About Giacomo Carissimi

Bill  •  Link

Giacomo Carissimi, maestro di capella of St. Apollinare, in the German College at Rome, one of the most excellent of the Italian musicians. He lived to be ninety years old, composed much, and died very rich.—Hawkins's Hist. of Music.
---Diary and correspondence of Samuel Pepys, the diary deciphered by J. Smith. 1854.

About Friday 15 July 1664

Bill  •  Link

“he hath given my Lord a character”

A cipher.
---Diary and correspondence of Samuel Pepys, the diary deciphered by J. Smith. 1854.

About Clarendon Park, Wiltshire

Bill  •  Link

Near Salisbury, granted by Edward VI. to Sir W. Herbert, Earl of Pembroke, for two lives, which lease determined in 1601, when it reverted to the Crown, and was conferred on the Duke of Albemarle, whose family got the estate after Lord Clarendon's fall; for, according to Britton, Clarendon Park was alienated by Christopher Monk, second Duke of Albemarle, to the Earl of Bath, from whom it passed, by purchase, to the ancestor of Sir Frederick Hervey Bathurst, Bart., the present possessor.
---Diary and correspondence of Samuel Pepys, the diary deciphered by J. Smith. 1854.

About Sunday 10 July 1664

Bill  •  Link

In returning to the large music- or ballroom, for it is used for both these purposes, we must again quote our friend Master Samuel Pepys, who so constantly, all through his Diary, alludes to the beautiful Lady Castlemaine, Barbara Villiers, afterwards Duchess of Cleveland, whose charms evidently exercised a wonderful fascination on the devout Samuel. On July 10th, 1664, he writes: "My Lady Sandwich showed us my Lady Castlemaine's picture, finely done; given my Lord; and a most beautiful picture it is." The portrait, a full length one, is by Sir Peter Lely, and is taken in a sitting position with one arm raised, the head resting on the hand. It is a delicate oval face, with dark hair and eyes, no trace, in the mild and rather dreamy expression, of the imperious and ambitious nature which ruled a king and gave years of anxiety to courtiers.
---The English Illustrated Magazine. vol.5, 1888.

About Thursday 26 May 1664

Bill  •  Link

“what a pitiful rout of people there was of them”

ROUT, a Multitude or Throng of People, Company or Flock, Squabble, Noise, Defeat of an Army.
---An universal etymological English dictionary. N. Bailey, 1724.

About Monday 30 May 1664

Bill  •  Link

I hope no one minds if we don't neglect the bells of Wales. "In addition to Rhymney, the poem also refers to the bells of a number of other places in South Wales, including Merthyr, Rhondda, Blaina, Caerphilly, Neath, Brecon, Swansea, Newport, Cardiff, and the Wye Valley."

Pete Seeger - The Bells Of Rhymney
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vK_eVaLeiQ0

About Wednesday 22 June 1664

Bill  •  Link

“The plague grows mightily among them, both at sea and land.”

"There dyed this last weeke at Amsterdam 730, but they feare an increase this weeke; and the plague is scattered generally over the whole country, even to Little Dorps and Villages; and it is gott to Antwerp and Bruxells, so that they will not suffer any ships or vessells of Holland or Zeland to come to Antwerp; and 2 severall shipps are returned out of Spaine for that they would not suffer them to have any trade at all there" (Sir George Downing's letter to Lord Clarendon, July 29th, 1664). — Lister's Life of Clarendon, vol. iii., p. 331.
---Wheatley, 1904.

About Friday 6 May 1664

Bill  •  Link

“ Sympson my joyner came to work upon altering my closet”

CARPENTRY, The Art of working in Wood, commonly applied to Building, whether it be of Houses or Ships.
JOINERY, The Art of performing the curious Part of Wood-Work, such as the Wainscoting of Rooms, Pewing Churches, making Pulpits, &c.
---A new general English dictionary. T. Dyche, 1735.

About Mulberry Garden (Hyde Park)

Bill  •  Link

Mulberry Garden (The), a place of public entertainment, temp. Charles I. and Charles II. The subject of a comedy by Sir Charles Sedley, and constantly referred to by the Charles II. dramatists. It occupied the site of the present Buckingham Palace and gardens, and derived its name from a garden of mulberry trees planted by King James I. in 1609, in which year £935 was expended by the King for "embanking a piece of ground and for planting of mulberry trees, near the palace of Westminster." James was anxious to introduce the mulberry into general cultivation for the sake of encouraging the manufacture of English silks. It was at this time that Shakespeare planted his mulberry tree at Stratford-on-Avon. Charles I., by letters patent, dated July 17, in the fourth year of his reign, granted to Walter, Lord Aston, on surrender of Jasper Hallenge, "the custody and keeping of the Mulberry Garden near St. James's, in the county of Middlesex, and of the mulberries and silkworms there, and of all the houses and buildings to the same garden belonging, for his own and his son's life, or the life of the longest liver." The name occurs for the first time in 1627 in the rate-books of the parish of St . Martin's-in-the-Fields. Before 1632 Lord Goring purchased the post from Lord Aston for £800, and gave his own name to the residence. The house was then occupied for a time by Speaker Lenthal, while the garden sank into a place of public entertainment . At the Restoration Goring returned to it; and, dying within two years, it was sold by his son and successor to Bennet, the newly created Baron Arlington, who was living here in March 1665, when Evelyn went there and described it as "ill-built, but capable of being made a very pretty villa." In 1671 the second and last Lord Goring died, and the grounds were demised by Charles II. (September 28, 1673) to Bennet, Earl of Arlington, at a rent of £1 per annum. Goring House, with all its valuable contents, was destroyed by fire September 20, 1674, whilst the family were at Bath. The Mulberry Garden, as a place of entertainment, was closed about the same time.
---London, Past and Present. H.B. Wheatley, 1891.

About Sir John Coke

Bill  •  Link

Sir John Coke (1563-1644) in 1618 was one of a special commission appointed for the examination of the state of the navy. He was rewarded for his work in the reform of the naval administration by a grant of £300 a year, charged on the funds of the navy, and expressly stated to be given "for his service in several marine causes, and for the office of ordnance, which he had long attended far remote from his family and to his great charge" (November, 1621). — Dictionary of National Biography.
---Wheatley, 1904.

About Saturday 4 June 1664

Bill  •  Link

"Opinastrement"

Maybe SP was having trouble with his French?

opiniâtrement, obstinately, stubbornly, wilfully.
---A short dictionary English and French. G. Miège, 1684.

About Thomas Neale

Bill  •  Link

NEALE, THOMAS (d.1699?), master of the royal mint and groom-porter; master and worker of the royal mint, 1678-99; groom-porter to Charles II, c. 1684; as master of the transfer office conducted public lotteries; engaged in banking and building and mining schemes, and in East India trade.
---Dictionary of National Biography: Index and Epitome. S. Lee, 1906.