Friday 12 February 1668/69

Up, and my wife with me to White Hall, and Tom, and there she sets us down, and there to wait on the Duke of York, with the rest of us, at the Robes, where the Duke of York did tell us that the King would have us prepare a draught of the present administration of the Navy, and what it was in the late times, in order to his being able to distinguish between the good and the bad, which I shall do, but to do it well will give me a great deal of trouble. Here we shewed him Sir J. Minnes’s propositions about balancing Storekeeper’s accounts; and I did shew him Hosier’s, which did please him mightily, and he will have it shewed the Council and King anon, to be put in practice. Thence to the Treasurer’s; and I and Sir J. Minnes and Mr. Tippets down to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury, and there had a hot debate from Sir Thomas Clifford and my Lord Ashly (the latter of which, I hear, is turning about as fast as he can to the Duke of Buckingham’s side, being in danger, it seems, of being otherwise out of play, which would not be convenient for him), against Sir W. Coventry and Sir J. Duncomb, who did uphold our Office against an accusation of our Treasurers, who told the Lords that they found that we had run the King in debt 50,000l. or more, more than the money appointed for the year would defray, which they declared like fools, and with design to hurt us, though the thing is in itself ridiculous. But my Lord Ashly and Clifford did most horribly cry out against the want of method in the Office. At last it come that it should be put in writing what they had to object; but I was devilish mad at it, to see us thus wounded by our own members, and so away vexed, and called my wife, and to Hercules Pillars, Tom and I, there dined; and here there coming a Frenchman by with his Shew, we did make him shew it us, which he did just as Lacy acts it, which made it mighty pleasant to me. So after dinner we away and to Dancre’s, and there saw our picture of Greenwich in doing, which is mighty pretty, and so to White Hall, my wife to Unthank’s, and I attended with Lord Brouncker the King and Council, about the proposition of balancing Storekeeper’s accounts and there presented Hosier’s book, and it was mighty well resented and approved of. So the Council being up, we to the Queen’s side with the King and Duke of York: and the Duke of York did take me out to talk of our Treasurers, whom he is mighty angry with: and I perceive he is mighty desirous to bring in as many good motions of profit and reformation in the Navy as he can, before the Treasurers do light upon them, they being desirous, it seems, to be thought the great reformers: and the Duke of York do well. But to my great joy he is mighty open to me in every thing; and by this means I know his whole mind, and shall be able to secure myself, if he stands. Here to-night I understand, by my Lord Brouncker, that at last it is concluded on by the King and Buckingham that my Lord of Ormond shall not hold his government of Ireland, which is a great stroke, to shew the power of Buckingham and the poor spirit of the King, and little hold that any man can have of him. Thence I homeward, and calling my wife called at my cozen Turner’s, and there met our new cozen Pepys (Mrs. Dickenson), and Bab. and Betty come yesterday to town, poor girls, whom we have reason to love, and mighty glad we are to see them; and there staid and talked a little, being also mightily pleased to see Betty Turner, who is now in town, and her brothers Charles and Will, being come from school to see their father, and there talked a while, and so home, and there Pelling hath got me W. Pen’s book against the Trinity. I got my wife to read it to me; and I find it so well writ as, I think, it is too good for him ever to have writ it; and it is a serious sort of book, and not fit for every body to read. So to supper and to bed.

8 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"Here we shewed him Sir J. Minnes’s propositions about balancing Storekeeper’s accounts; and I did shew him Hosier’s, which did please him mightily, and he will have it shewed the Council and King anon, to be put in practice. "

Pepys follows through: http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1668/11/24/#c38...
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Chris Squire   Link to this

‘ . . and there presented Hosier’s book, and it was mighty well resented and approved of.’

‘resent, v. Etym: < Anglo-Norman resenter
. . 5. trans. . . b. To take favourably, to approve of . . Obs. rare.
a1646 J. Gregory Posthuma (1649) 168 Mahomet having introduc'd a new Superstition, which the men of Mecha‥resented not, was forced to flie that place.
1650 Brief Descr. Future Hist. Europe To Rdr. 1 There are several passages in it, which (I know) will not resent with our Great Ones.’ [OED]

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"here there coming a Frenchman by with his Shew, we did make him shew it us, which he did just as Lacy acts it, which made it mighty pleasant to me."

L&M suggest a [ portable ] puppet-show featuring a part played in the manner of, mimicking one of the many played by John Lacy, the leading comedian of the King's Company. See http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/6368/#re...

Mary   Link to this

"that the King would have us prepare a draught of the present administration of the Navy, and what it was in the late times, in order to his being able to distinguish between the good and the bad, which I shall do, but to do it well will give me a great deal of trouble."

Won't it, just?

Ralph Berry   Link to this

"...balancing Storekeeper's accounts..."

Do we know what type of bookkeeping systems were being used in the Navy at this time or indeed for Sam's personal accounting? The Australian author Jane Gleeson-White in her book "Double Entry" sets out the history and that the double entry system was formulated by the arabs, recorded by the Italian Friar Pacioli in the late fifteenth century, adopted completely by the Venetians who also had a strong audit policy and afterwards by the Dutch. It was known as the "Venetian" or "Italian" method. She suggests that it was not universally used by the British until the nineteenth century and I know from my early accounting training even in the twentieth century some British firms were still using single entry accounting. Double Entry is now almost universally adopted.

On the 11 Feb Sam mentioned his Day Book, I assume this is similar to the first book of record prescribed by Pacioli which he called the "Memoriale"

Do any of Sam's accounting records survive and do we know the system he used? When he talks about balancing accounts was he referring to balancing his trial balance or balancing his bookkeeping to the cash and assets on hand? Do any commentators have any ideas??

Can we assume he was using Arabic and not Roman numerals?

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Pepys left us a sample of expenses ("Memorials"?) last June 5-17 while traveling. http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1668/06/05/

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Will Penn Jr. now truly embarked on his famed career...And Sam finding himself impressed, in spite of himself. Well, could be worse...Considering Will used to mildly flirt with Bess in French...

"...not fit for every body to read."

"This is quite a book, Sam'l." Bess notes. "Hard to believe it's by the same young (though like your Johnny, harmless) fellow who used to drop by, speaking to me."

"Indeed..."

"I feel so bad..."

"Bess?"

"I mean when we Catholics take over, we'll have to burn him if the Church hasn't already. Though it is so well done...Perhaps I'll join his Society."

"Are you just having fun with me? Or...?"

"Me to know, you to find out."

pepfie   Link to this

Update "well resented"

resent, v.

†II.8.b To take or receive in a certain way or with certain feelings; to take well or ill. Obs. (common c 1655–85).

... 1669 Pepys Diary 13 Feb., It was mighty well resented and approved of.  
[OED 2nd ed. 2009]

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