Monday 6 July 1668

Up, and to St. James’s, and there attended the Duke of York, and was there by himself told how angry he was, and did declare to my Lord Anglesey, about his late complaining of things of the Navy to the King in Council, and not to him; and I perceive he is mightily concerned at it, and resolved to reform things therein.

Thence with W. Coventry walked in the Park together a good while, he mighty kind to me. And hear many pretty stories of my Lord Chancellor’s being heretofore made sport of by Peter Talbot the priest, in his story of the death of Cardinall Bleau;1 by Lord Cottington, in his ‘Dolor de las Tyipas’;2 and Tom Killigrew, in his being bred in Ram Ally, and now bound prentice to Lord Cottington, going to Spain with 1000l., and two suits of clothes. Thence home to dinner, and thence to Mr. Cooper’s, and there met my wife and W. Hewer and Deb.; and there my wife first sat for her picture: but he is a most admirable workman, and good company. Here comes Harris, and first told us how Betterton is come again upon the stage: whereupon my wife and company to the [Duke’s] house to see “Henry the Fifth;” while I to attend the Duke of York at the Committee of the Navy, at the Council, where some high dispute between him and W. Coventry about settling pensions upon all Flag-Officers, while unemployed: W. Coventry against it, and, I think, with reason. Thence I to the playhouse, and saw a piece of the play, and glad to see Betterton; and so with wife and Deb. to Spring-garden, and eat a lobster, and so home in the evening and to bed. Great doings at Paris, I hear, with their triumphs for their late conquests! The Duchesse of Richmond sworn last week of the queen’s Bedchamber, and the King minding little else but what he used to do — about his women.


11 Annotations

Terry Foreman  •  Link

L&M note, like Clarendon, Cardinal Balue had been hated for his wealth and power; the two had been accused, but not convicted, of treason. Talbot was probably referring not to the death of Balue, but to his imprisonment (1469-1480) -- as rumor had it, in a cage in which he could neither stand nor sit.

Jesse  •  Link

"resolved to reform things therein"

Reform what, going over the DoY's head to complain or the issues behind the complaint?

Robert Gertz  •  Link

Rejoicing in Paris over conquests and a version of Henry V on stage in London...Hmmn...

Paris...

"So...The English challenge us with a bad version of Henry V, eh? Well, we shall counter with a marginally better 'William the Conqueror'...After all, their Henri may have captured most of France for a time but our William never lost England...Ha, ha, ha..."

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"Cardinal Jean Balue was the minister of Louis XI. of France. The reader will remember him in Sir W. Scott’s “Quentin Durward.” "

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quentin_Durward + links to the text.

L&M say authority for the story of his prison cage is dubious.

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"I to attend the Duke of York at the Committee of the Navy, at the Council, where some high dispute between him and W. Coventry about settling pensions upon all Flag-Officers, while unemployed: W. Coventry against it, and, I think, with reason."

The issue apparently is whether naval officers -- like army officers -- should be continuously employed, so pension-worthy when "unemployed," i.e., in peacetime.

L&M note the Duke of York's view prevailed, the navy was gradually professionalized from the Flag-officers down by the time of the Third Dutch War (1672-4), and Pepys would regard this as an essental reform. (Why he and Coventry opposed this now is unknown.)

***

Bryan M  •  Link

(Why he and Coventry opposed this now is unknown.)

Coventry was Treasury's man and Sam was the navy's bean counter. I suspect the reason was the perennial problem: "the want of money in the Navy".

In his biography of Sam's chum Robert Holmes, Ollard argues that a major advantage that the Dutch had over the English was their superior financial administration.

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"And hear many pretty stories of my Lord Chancellor's being heretofore made sport of...by Lord Cottington, in his Dolor de las Tripas ["Pain in the gut"] ; and Tom Killigrew, in his being bred in Ram Ally, and now bound 'prentice to Lord Cottington, going to Spain with 1,000, and two suits of clothes. "

Ram Alley was a debtors' sanctuary off Fleet St. Presumably Killigrew was taken into Cottington's service in te autumn of 1629 when the latter went on a mission to Spain. He would then have been 17. (L&M note)

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

'Charles II: July 1668', in Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1667-8, ed. Mary Anne Everett Green (London, 1893), pp. 469-516.
https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-paper…

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July 6. 1668
Chatham.
Sir John Mennes to the Navy Commissioners.

Mr. Slaughter brought 5,000/. on the 5th instant,
of which 1,300/. is paid on the remaining tickets for the Charles and Defiance,
and the last 20 days’ board wages of the dock and ropeyard.

The 3,700/. remaining with 2,500/. more, will pay the Old James and 4 other ships named, and supply the chest-money and clothes stopped;

but 5,500/. more must be sent down, with all convenient speed, or the clamors of the seamen and workmen will be great, and a greater charge will accrue;
they grow seditious when any demur is made about payment.

I cannot but mind you of the growing charge in the yard and of the small materials there have long been to employ the men Mr. Deane has assisted in the Royal Oak.
I apprehend the breaking of her up necessary, and her planks would be useful in the repair of the dock now in hand.
It is time to resolve about the frame of the new ship, or her timber will decay as winter comes on.

We have one Bowyer here, who was called to account for the mast he stole.
Thefts of late have been so encouraged by non-punishment that more are daily committed, and if he be not punished, if will be in vain to hope for amendment; that he may be brought to speedy trial, he should be sent for by a messenger, as it will be long before he can be tried here.
It is suspected that on examination others will be found to have had a hand in the theft,

Mr. Mason will not take less than his demand for his timber;
it is good, and fit for the new ship.

[2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 242, No. 147.]
Encloses,

Tender by [John] Mason
of 555 loads of timber, at 50s. to 60s. a load, for 500/. in hand, and ready money on the delivery of every load;
the 500/. to be deducted out of the last money due when the contract shall be completed.
[Copy. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 242, No. 147i.]

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July 6. 1668
Pendennis.
Fras. Bellott to Williamson.

Capt. Collier of the Constant Katherine, and Capt. Rand, and 6 or 7 small outward-bound vessels have arrived;
the Berwick vessel is still here, laden with salt.

The town of Falmouth was in great danger of burning by an accident in drying malt, but by the diligence of the town and neighbours, it was soon quenched, and only a malthouse or two, and a dwelling-house with some woodstacks, were brunt down.

Asks whether to continue his correspondence, having received no news for 4 weeks.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 242, No. 152.]

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July 6. 1668
Falmouth.
Thos. Holden to Hickes.

The Constant Katherine bound for Barbados,
the Prudent Mary for Leghorn,
and 2 ketches for Calais and Bilbao are here.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 242, No. 153.]

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

July 6. 1668
Weymouth.
John Pocock to Hickes.

There are in Portland road 25 sail of Dutchmen, with their convoy, bound for France,
and 18 sail of English and Frenchmen waiting for a fair wind.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 242, No. 154.]

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July 6. 1668
Swansea.
Capt. John Man to Williamson.

Why is the weekly news discontinued?
Is it laid aside because of the peaceable times, or have I given any cause of offence?
I have had no news lately.

I hear from Falmouth that several vessels drust not put out for fear of some Turkish men-of-war upon the coast, which report, although not confirmed by a vessel from the Isle of Wight,
Puts terror upon the small colliers.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 242, No. 155.]

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July 6. 1668
Lyme.
Anth Thorold to. Hickes.

The rest of the vessels have arrived from Rotterdam, and say the people there are well satisfied, and reckon themselves much strengthened by the alliance with England, as well as defended from the threats of the French.

Several ships have sailed for Morlaix and St. Malo with drapery,
and for Jersey and Guernsey with provisions.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 242, No. 156.]

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July 6. 1668
Blickling [Norfolk].
Russell to Rob. Francis.

Thanks for your forwarding my letters.
I wish this were a place where I could do you some services;
I may call it my exile, after the enjoyment of Paris and London; although I lived here a good while formerly.
I shall now hardly frame my mind to it.

Let me be supplied with the news.
When does Sir John Trevor ascend to what you know?
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 242, No. 157.]

Sir John Trevor was the Envoy Extraordinary for the Peace negotiations at Aix. It sounds as if "Russell" was an aide.

Blickling Hall in Norfolk is fabulous ... but unless "Russell" is a member of the Hobart family, he's just a guest.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blickling_Hall

Tonyel  •  Link

Tender by [John] Mason
of 555 loads of timber, at 50s. to 60s. a load, for 500/. in hand, and ready money on the delivery of every load;
the 500/. to be deducted out of the last money due when the contract shall be completed.

There's a man who knows whom he is dealing with! It would be interesting to know if the Navy Office accepted such terms - or even if they were able to.

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