Monday 2 November 1668

Up, and a cold morning, by water through bridge without a cloak, and there to Mr. Wren at his chamber at White Hall, the first time of his coming thither this year, the Duchess coming thither tonight, and there he and I did read over my paper that I have with so much labour drawn up about the several answers of the officers of this Office to the Duke of York’s reflections, and did debate a little what advice to give the Duke of York when he comes to town upon it. Here come in Lord Anglesy, and I perceive he makes nothing of this order for his suspension, resolving to contend and to bring it to the Council on Wednesday when the King is come to town to-morrow, and Mr. Wren do join with him mightily in it, and do look upon the Duke of York as concerned more in it than he. So to visit Creed at his chamber, but his wife not come thither yet, nor do he tell me where she is, though she be in town, at Stepney, at Atkins’s. So to Mr. Povy’s to talk about a coach, but there I find my Lord Sandwich, and Peterborough, and Hinchingbroke, Charles Harbord, and Sidney Montagu; and there I was stopped, and dined mighty nobly at a good table, with one little dish at a time upon it, but mighty merry. I was glad to see it: but sorry, methought, to see my Lord have so little reason to be merry, and yet glad, for his sake, to have him cheerful. After dinner up, and looked up and down the house, and so to the cellar; and thence I slipt away, without taking leave, and so to a few places about business, and among others to my bookseller’s in Duck Lane, and so home, where the house still full of dirt by painters and others, and will not be clean a good while. So to read and talk with my wife till by and by called to the office about Sir W. Warren’s business, where we met a little, and then home to supper and to bed. This day I went, by Mr. Povy’s direction, to a coachmaker near him, for a coach just like his, but it was sold this very morning.

13 Annotations

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"So to Mr. Povy’s to talk about a coach, but there I find my Lord Sandwich, and Peterborough, and Hinchingbroke, Charles Harbord, and Sidney Montagu;..." Hmmn...Peterborough, Povy, Sandwich all share a history over Tangier. I wonder if the ex-Tangierites have something in mind or if it's just enjoying Povy's famed hospitality.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

The coach near Povey

L&M remind that Povey lived in Lincoln's Inn Fields http://goo.gl/kJrNd , and notes that nearby Long Acre [ to the WSW ] was celebrated both now and later for its coach-makers. http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/7287/#c9...

Clement   Link to this

"... and there he and I did read over my paper that I have with so much labour drawn up about the several answers of the officers of this Office to the Duke of York’s reflections..."

The text of Sam's notes are mentioned and cited here:

"As soon as these replies came in to the duke they were passed over to Pepys, the organiser of the whole transaction. He proceeded to digest them into a short form for the convenience of the duke, and on 2 Nov. forwarded this summary to Mr. Wren, the duke's secretary, with a letter, in which he gives his own opinion of the state of the navy office. 'The Pest of this Office,' he writes,

"has all along been an indifference in some of the principal members of it in seeing their worke done, provided they found themselves furnished with any tollerable pretence for their personal failures in the doeing it; whereas the value of the Naval Action has been such as to render every branch of it considerable, and every remiss performance thereof more chargeable to his Majesty then the wages of such an Officer many times told."

I'd say others on the Navy Board may assign a differnt identity to the "Pest of this Office."

From The English Historical Review, Vol. 12, (edited by Creighton et al.) p. 44. Accessed 2 November, 2011, from this link. http://books.google.com/books?id=TRopAAAAYAAJ&p...

The article contains an excellent account of this whole affair.

martinb   Link to this

"dined mighty nobly at a good table, with one little dish at a time upon it"

Tapas for Sandwich?

#He's just back from Spain, after all.#

Chris Faulkner   Link to this

Dining in the Russian rather than the French style? Or is it a bit early for this? I'm not sure when dining in courses rather than everyting on the table at once came in.

Dorothy   Link to this

I think Russian style came in about the middle of the 19th century. I don't know what is going on here, but I like the idea that Sandwich brought tapas back from Spain!

Terry Foreman   Link to this

This Wikipedia article seems to corroborate what Dorothy thinks about the timing.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Service_%C3%A0_la_...

A. De Araujo   Link to this

"with one little dish at a time upon it"
Tapas is like an appetizer,then comes the entree that is not necessarily a little dish.

Andrew Hamilton   Link to this

A la russe is the way I was raised, though usually without the clutter of miscellaneous specialized utensils. But when we lived in France my mother discovered that it was considered polite to eat when served, rather than waiting for the head of the table to begin (and letting things get colder). I have followed that practice ever since.

languagehat   Link to this

"Tapas is like an appetizer,then comes the entree that is not necessarily a little dish."

I think of tapas as something to be consumed at bars, without any entree to follow. But I have never been in Spain; my experience is pure NYC.

Australian Susan   Link to this

Dining Fashions

Mrs Beeton (writing mid-19th c) describes the a la Russe style in her cook books, but in her biography (Kathryn Hughes, 2006), the author points out that a lot of what she wrote was aspirational for the middle classes. Eating a la Russe required far more crockery and cutlery than the old style (a lot of dishes put out at once, eaten from and then cleared and a second service of dishes put out) so she does describe and give table layouts for the old style in the older editions of her cook books. I have 1890s and 1907 editions (passed down from relatives) and these solely refer to the a la Russe fashion, so it must have become the common practice sometime between the 1860s and the 1890s. By then a formal dinner had crystallised into the haut-bourgeois style of : hors d'oeuvre, soup, fish, entree, remove [a roast], roti [a luxury such a rare game], vegetables, pudding, savoury, dessert [cheese and fruits]
Maybe this was a fancy way of serving up meals which Sandwich had picked up in Spain? I have no knowledge of dining habits in high society in Spain in the 17th century. Apropos of these fashions in serving food - Jane Austen would have been used to the old style of serving up dinners and it produces teeth-grinding irritation in me to see anything else being done in tv adaptations.

Ivan   Link to this

I just wondered why Mr Pepys, after exploring the house and going down to the cellar, felt it necessary to slip away "without taking leave". I take it he hadn't been helping himself to Mr Povy's wine!!

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