Wednesday 11 March 1667/68

Up, and betimes to the office, where busy till 8 o’clock, and then went forth, and meeting Mr. Colvill, I walked with him to his building, where he is building a fine house, where he formerly lived, in Lumbard Street: and it will be a very fine street. Thence walked down to the Three Cranes and there took boat to White Hall, where by direction I waited on the Duke of York about office business, and so by water to Westminster, where walking in the Hall most of the morning, and up to my Lady Jem. in Lincoln’s Inn Fields to get her to appoint the day certain when she will come and dine with me, and she hath appointed Saturday next. So back to Westminster; and there still walked, till by and by comes Sir W. Coventry, and with him Mr. Chichly and Mr. Andrew Newport, I to dinner with them to Mr. Chichly’s, in Queene Street, in Covent Garden. A very fine house, and a man that lives in mighty great fashion, with all things in a most extraordinary manner noble and rich about him, and eats in the French fashion all; and mighty nobly served with his servants, and very civilly; that I was mighty pleased with it: and good discourse. He is a great defender of the Church of England, and against the Act for Comprehension, which is the work of this day, about which the House is like to sit till night. After dinner, away with them back to Westminster, where, about four o’clock, the House rises, and hath done nothing more in the business than to put off the debate to this day month. In the mean time the King hath put out his proclamations this day, as the House desired, for the putting in execution the Act against Nonconformists and Papists, but yet it is conceived that for all this some liberty must be given, and people will have it. Here I met with my cozen Roger Pepys, who is come to town, and hath been told of my performance before the House the other day, and is mighty proud of it, and Captain Cocke met me here to-day, and told me that the Speaker says he never heard such a defence made; in all his life, in the House; and that the Sollicitor-Generall do commend me even to envy. I carried cozen Roger as far as the Strand, where, spying out of the coach Colonel Charles George Cocke, formerly a very great man, and my father’s customer, whom I have carried clothes to, but now walks like a poor sorry sneake, he stopped, and I ‘light to him. This man knew me, which I would have willingly avoided, so much pride I had, he being a man of mighty height and authority in his time, but now signifies nothing. Thence home, where to the office a while and then home, where W. Batelier was and played at cards and supped with us, my eyes being out of order for working, and so to bed.

11 Annotations

Christopher Squire   Link to this

Re: ' . . walks like a poor sorry sneake . . ' OED has:

‘sneak, n. 1. a. A sneaking, mean-spirited, paltry, or despicable person; one who acts in a shifty, shabby, or underhand manner.
. . 1677    W. Hughes Man of Sin ii. x. 159   The Devil,‥being baffled, packs away, like a silly Sneak as he was.’

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Colonel Charles George Cocke, formerly a very great man, and my father’s customer, whom I have carried clothes to, but now walks like a poor sorry sneake, he stopped, and I ‘light to him. This man knew me, which I would have willingly avoided, so much pride I had, he being a man of mighty height and authority in his time, but now signifies nothing."

"You there, boy..." No doubt a painful memory...

Still, Fortuna's wheel turns without regard, Sam. I'd beware "so much pride" lest you might one day be "a man of mighty height and authority in his time, but now signifies nothing."

Ralph Berry   Link to this

".....and eats in the French fashion all;"

Any thoughts as to what "the French fashion" was when it came to eating?

Tony Eldridge   Link to this

The French fashion.
I believe this was the startling new idea of serving the courses one after another so that they arrived hot at the table. Normally everything was produced simultaneously and people grabbed any combination they felt like.

Mary   Link to this

The French fashion.

This was to have one's meal served course by course (as we do today) rather than with all the dishes laid upon the table at the same time, for people to pick and choose at what took their fancy and in what order or combination of dishes. This latter fashion persisted well into the 19th century before giving way to the French fashion entirely. (Except, I suppose, for buffet meals, but that's another matter).

Serving a formal meal course by course required the attention of more servants than the all-at-once style if everyone was to be served promptly and this fact alone probably limited its appeal to all but the very comfortably off (or pretentious).

Larry   Link to this

Sic transit gloria mundi, eh Sam? Nothing as sobering as a life lesson with the morning coffee!

JWB   Link to this

"...Colonel Charles George Cocke, formerly a very great man, and my father’s customer,..."

and Thomas Paine's ancestor.

Ralph Berry   Link to this

The French fashion.

Thank you Tony and Mary. Interesting that several asian countries (unless westernised) still serve food in the traditional fashion.

arby   Link to this

As they do sometimes in Kentucky too, Ralph. Shaker Village does, as do some "country" restaurants. And "dinner" at noon for laborers on a farm during harvest is served that way. I'm getting hungry..

Don O'Shea   Link to this

Durgin Park in Boston ("Established before you were born") serves meals "family style." (http://web.me.com/donoshea/DownEast/Wrapping_It...)

pepfie   Link to this

Another sneake.

OED citation for sneak, n. 1.a.: 1668 Pepys Diary 8 Mar., When all is done, he is a sneake; who owns his owing me £10‥and yet cannot provide to pay me.
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1668/03/08/
So, a Project Gutenberg misscan excepted, Sir Philip is either Wheatley's shirke or Latham & Matthews' sneake.

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