Wednesday 8 May 1667

Up pretty betimes and out of doors, and in Fen Church street met Mr. Lovett going with a picture to me, but I could not stand to discourse or see it, but on to the next hackney coach and so to Sir W. Coventry, where he and I alone a while discoursing of some businesses of the office, and then up to the Duke of York to his chamber with my fellow brethren who are come, and so did our usual weekly business, which was but little to-day, and I was glad that the business of Carcasse was not mentioned because our report was not ready, but I am resolved it shall against the next coming to the Duke of York. Here was discourse about a way of paying our old creditors which did please me, there being hopes of getting them comprehended within the 11 months Tax, and this did give occasion for Sir G. Carteret’s and my going to Sir Robert Long to discourse it, who do agree that now the King’s Council do say that they may be included in the Act, which do make me very glad, not so much for the sake of the poor men as for the King, for it would have been a ruin to him and his service not to have had a way to have paid the debt. There parted with Sir G. Carteret and into Westminster Hall, where I met with Sir H. Cholmly, and he and I to Sir Ph. Warwicke’s to speak a little about our Tangier business, but to little purpose, my Lord Treasurer being so ill that no business can be done. Thence with Sir H. Cholmly to find out Creed from one lodging to another, which he hath changed so often that there is no finding him, but at last do come to his lodging that he is entering into this day, and do find his goods unlading at the door, by Scotland Yard, and there I set down Sir H. Cholmly, and I away to the ‘Change, where spoke about several things, and then going home did meet Mr. Andrews our neighbour, and did speak with him to enquire about the ground behind our house, of which I have a mind to buy enough to make a stable and coach-house; for I do see that my condition do require it, as well as that it is more charge to my purse to live as I do than to keep one, and therefore I am resolved before winter to have one, unless some extraordinary thing happens to hinder me. He promises me to look after it for me, and so I home to dinner, where I find my wife’s flageolette master, and I am so pleased with her proceeding, though she hath lost time by not practising, that I am resolved for the encouragement of the man to learn myself a little for a month or so, for I do foresee if God send my wife and I to live, she will become very good company for me. He gone, comes Lovett with my little print of my dear Lady Castlemayne varnished, and the frame prettily done like gold, which pleases me well. He dined with me, but by his discourse I do still see that he is a man of good wit but most strange experience, and acquaintance with all manner of subtleties and tricks, that I do think him not fit for me to keep any acquaintance with him, lest he some time or other shew me a slippery trick. After dinner, he gone, I to the office, where all the afternoon very busy, and so in the evening to Sir R. Viner’s, thinking to finish my accounts there, but am prevented, and so back again home, and late at my office at business, and so home to supper and sing a little with my dear wife, and so to bed.

15 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"the 11 months Tax"

See the links to the statutory authority
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1667/05/06/#c29...

Terry Foreman   Link to this

John Evelyn's Diary

8th May, 1667. Made up accounts with our Receiver, which amounted to £33,93 1s. 4d. Dined at Lord Cornbury's [ Clarendon ] , with Don Francisco de Melos, Portugal Ambassador, and kindred to the Queen [ http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/2752/ ]; Of the party were Mr. Henry Jermyn [ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Jermyn,_1st_... ] and Sir Henry Capel
[ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Capell,_1st_... ]. Afterward I went to Arundel House, to salute Mr. Howard's sons, newly returned out of France.

http://bit.ly/9cjrV7

Bradford   Link to this

"he is a man of good wit but most strange experience, and acquaintance with all manner of subtleties and tricks": the Pot recognizes the Kettle?

"I do foresee if God send my wife and I to live, she will become very good company for me." If we should see what lies ahead as we now know what lurks behind. . . .

JWB   Link to this

"...as well as that it is more charge to my purse to live as I do than to keep one..."

One born every minute.

Eric Walla   Link to this

... and if I add but a small amount to the total, I find I would receive heated seats in the carriage, which would be most convenient, plus they would throw in mudguards for free ...

cum salis grano   Link to this

"...is more charge to my purse to live as I do than to keep one,..."
"cheaper to have one's own limo than to hire one"
Taxis be expensive and oats cheap, and the freedom to move as one wishes and it be on time every time and of course the prestige of having your first Roller with your own moniker on the doors , curtains down and no one can see the must not be seen, oh! the possibilities.

James ! round the park we must a go.

Mary   Link to this

"my dear wife"

A singular sign of affection from Sam. She's usually "my poor wife."

Michael Robinson   Link to this

" ... Lovett with my little print of my dear Lady Castlemayne varnished, and the frame prettily done like gold, ..."

Very probably one of the impressions purchased December 1st:

Barbara Palmer (née Villiers), Duchess of Cleveland
by William Faithorne, after Sir Peter Lely
line engraving, 1666. 14 in. x 11 in. (356 mm x 280 mm) plate size;
http://www.npg.org.uk/collections/search/portra...

” … calling at Faythorne’s, buying three of my Lady Castlemayne’s heads, printed this day, which indeed is, as to the head, I think, a very fine picture, and like her.” http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1666/12/01/
Delivered to Lovett on January 21st.:
At home find Lovett, to whom I did give my Lady Castlemayne’s head to do. http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1667/01/21/

JWB   Link to this

"...that they may be included in the Act, which do make me very glad, not so much for the sake of the poor men as for the King."

Kant, Kant...
Where art thou?
The political world hath need of thee.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Up pretty betimes and out of doors, and in Fen Church street met Mr. Lovett going with a picture to me, but I could not stand to discourse or see it, but on to the next hackney coach and so to Sir W. Coventry..."

"Lovett. Time, money...Wartime, exponentially so. Pray understand. Farewell."

JWB   Link to this

Kant: "The rights of men must be held sacred, however much sacrifice it may cost the ruling power. One cannot compromise here and seek the middle course of a pragmatic conditional law between the morally right and the expedient. All politics must bend its knee before the right. But by this it can hope slowly to reach the stage where it will shine with an immortal glory."
Appendix I, "Perpetual Peace".
http://www.constitution.org/kant/append1.htm

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"There you are, sir. The one copy of my portrait of our Lady Castlemaine. Signed by me, sir."

"Yes...Excellent, Lovett. I shall treasure its uniqueness. In private, you understand..."

"Certainly, Mr. Pepys." Bow. Shuts door.

"All right, that's another Castlemaine gone...How many to go?"

"500, Mr. Lovett."

"Lord... Hendricks, my note specified 50 only. Don't the words 'limited edition' mean anything to you?"

"Not really, sir. Can't read for beans, sir. Did rather recognize the numbers, sir as being like the last order, sir."

"Yes, but that was when Castlemaine was hot. Tis Stewart that's drawing them in now. Now, 500 Stewarts, we can use."

***
Tonight...

"Sam'l. Who is this?"

nangh...Lord almighty. Sam stares at incriminating minature.

"Jane found it on the floor of your closet while cleaning."

Possible responses:

1) "Creed must have dropped it when he was here. The silly rogue."

2) "Jane? What were you doing in my closet, girl? Are we letting the servants rummaging everywhere now?"

3)"What minature?" Grab and toss out window. "I saw no minature."

4)"Good God, woman! There's a war on and you would bother me with such nonsense?"

5)"I must be off to Deptford (Westminister, the Exchange, Whitehall, etc) immediately. There is an emergency only I can resolve."

6)"That fool Lovett. He sent the wrong minature!"

5)

Andrew Hamilton   Link to this

so home to supper and sing a little with my dear wife

A lovely matrimonial harmony.

Do they sing parts, I wonder?

martinb   Link to this

"I do foresee if God send my wife and I to live, she will become very good company for me."

Sad, this.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

You do get a sense of Sam trying to balance sincere love for his wife with his desperate desire to enjoy all life has to offer before time runs out. And the pain he will feel at finding Fate/God/Destiny has played a vicious joke on him.

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