Friday 9 June 1665

Lay long in bed, my head akeing with too much thoughts I think last night. Up and to White Hall, and my Lord Treasurer’s to Sir Ph. Warwicke, about Tangier business, and in my way met with Mr. Moore, who eases me in one point wherein I was troubled; which was, that I heard of nothing said or done by my Lord Sandwich: but he tells me that Mr. Cowling, my Lord Chamberlain’s secretary, did hear the King say that my Lord Sandwich had done nobly and worthily. The King, it seems, is much troubled at the fall of my Lord of Falmouth; but I do not meet with any man else that so much as wishes him alive again, the world conceiving him a man of too much pleasure to do the King any good, or offer any good office to him. But I hear of all hands he is confessed to have been a man of great honour, that did show it in this his going with the Duke, the most that ever any man did. Home, where my people busy to make ready a supper against night for some guests, in lieu of my stonefeast. At noon eat a small dinner at home, and so abroad to buy several things, and among others with my taylor to buy a silke suit, which though I had one lately, yet I do, for joy of the good newes we have lately had of our victory over the Dutch, which makes me willing to spare myself something extraordinary in clothes; and after long resolution of having nothing but black, I did buy a coloured silk ferrandin. So to the Old Exchange, and there at my pretty seamstresses bought a pair of stockings of her husband, and so home, where by and by comes Mr. Honiwood and Mrs. Wilde, and Roger Pepys and, after long time spent, Mrs. Turner, The. and Joyce. We had a very good venison pasty, this being instead of my stone-feast the last March, and very merry we were, and the more I know the more I like Mr. Honiwood’s conversation. So after a good supper they parted, walking to the ‘Change for a coach, and I with them to see them there. So home and to bed, glad it was over.

12 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"ferrandin"

"ferrandin, farrandin, farandine
cloth of silk mixed with wool or hair" (L&M Select Glossary)

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"But I hear of all hands he is confessed to have been a man of great honour, that did show it in this his going with the Duke, the most that ever any man did."

Tis a far, far better thing...

But one can respectfully mourn a hearty, if pleasure-loving young man who in the end did his duty and paid the ultimate price. And all the other nameless carefree young men and women in all wars loved and mourned, one hopes, by someone.

Was it worth it, Charlie?
***
"...which though I had one lately, yet I do, for joy of the good newes we have lately had of our victory over the Dutch, which makes me willing to spare myself something extraordinary in clothes..."

"It is my only weakness..."-Dr. Praetorius, "The Bride of Frankenstein".

Martin   Link to this

"stonefeast"
To this day, this coinage of Sam's is pretty much his own -- Google it and you'll find only 46 references, most of them Pepysian.

Last March 26, the anniversary of Sam's being "cut of the stone", was Easter, and Mrs. Turner, for one, begged off an invitation extended for that day. So, as Sam noted on March 26, he put the celebration off for another time.

Patricia   Link to this

"So home and to bed, glad it was over." Yes, I'm sure we all know the feeling of bidding a welcome goodbye to guests, no matter how much they are loved.

dirk   Link to this

Evelyn's diary:

"Next day I had instant orders to repaire to the Downes; so as I got to Rochester this evening, dined next day at Canterbury,"

CGS   Link to this

ferrandin, farrandin, farandine
OED:
a. A kind of cloth used in the seventeenth century, made partly of silk and partly of wool or hair. b. A dress made of this material. Also attrib.
1663 PEPYS Diary 28 Jan., Her new ferrandin waiste~coate.

1672 WYCHERLEY Love in Wood v, I know a great Lady that cannot follow her husband abroad..because her Farrandine is so ragged.

connection????
farandman Sc. Law. Obs.

[f. FARANDINE + -ICAL.]

Of the nature of farandine; hence, second-rate, worthless. Cf. the use of bombast, fustian, linsey-woolsey.

[f. farand, obs. pr. pple. of FARE to travel + MAN.]

A stranger, a traveller.
The law of farandman provided that a pedlar, not residing within the shrievalty, should have the right of bringing to trial, ‘within the third flowing and ebbing of the sea’, any person who had committed theft or felony against him.
[c1205

A. De Araujo   Link to this

"Lay long in bed, my head akeing with too much thought I think last night"
Tension Headache most likely;muscular.

jeannine   Link to this

"The King, it seems, is much troubled at the fall of my Lord of Falmouth; but I do not meet with any man else that so much as wishes him alive again, the world conceiving him a man of too much pleasure to do the King any good, or offer any good office to him. But I hear of all hands he is confessed to have been a man of great honour, that did show it in this his going with the Duke, the most that ever any man did."

After having read his biography I can understand the popular masses opinion on this one. Falmouth (Charles Berkeley) had collected a few titles in the short time he was in the Diary, which annoyed those who actually did things to ‘earn’ their titles. He first started out as a "servant"/friend of the DOY and then Charles picked him up in his entourage. He was the friend of the DOY who tried to get him off the hook from his marriage to Anne Hyde by lying and saying that he (and others) had “been with her” which was a totally false accusation to discredit her with hopes to dissolve the marriage. He also was part of the little cabal group at Lady Castlemaine’s so he was in tight with the nasty political crowd and their activities. The book about him “The King’s Friend” by Hartmann takes the lame stance that Berkeley’s actions in support of the DOY were only done due to his devoted loyalty to the Stuart’s and uses this as an ‘excuse’ for his pathetic behavior. Apparently Sam and others didn’t see things that way.

JWB   Link to this

Honiwood etymology:

That's hunt wood, from A/S huntnath; not honey wood.

http://books.google.com/books?id=HeUIAAAAQAAJ&p...

cgs   Link to this

ferrandin, farrandin, farandine ref:buy a silke suit??
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1663/01/28/

http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/5881/

Australian Susan   Link to this

Coloured

We've discussed this before - it probably means red in this context - isn't Sam being fine!

dirk   Link to this

The Carte Papers at the Bodleian Library confirm that Sandwich received a letter from the King, dated 9 June, which (although we don't know the contents) seems to have been praising Sandwich for his action during the Lowestoft battle.

Sandwich's answer:

"
Sandwich to the King
Date: 12 June 1665

Thanks his Majesty for the gracious letter of June 9th.

Hopes that His Majesty's undertakings will continue to be attended by such glorious successes as those which the writer has lived to see. Is sure that his own service will be faithful, but begs the King's pardon for its faults.
"

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