Friday 15 July 1664

Up, and to my Lord Sandwich’s; where he sent for me up, and I did give my Lord an account of what had passed with my Lord Chancellor yesterday; with which he was well pleased, and advised me by all means to study in the best manner I could to serve him in this business. After this discourse ended, he begun to tell me that he had now pitched upon his day of going to sea upon Monday next, and that he would now give me an account how matters are with him. He told me that his work now in the world is only to keep up his interest at Court, having little hopes to get more considerably, he saying that he hath now about 8,000l. per annum. It is true, he says, he oweth about 10,000l.; but he hath been at great charges in getting things to this pass in his estate; besides his building and good goods that he hath bought. He says he hath now evened his reckonings at the Wardrobe till Michaelmas last, and hopes to finish it to Ladyday before he goes. He says now there is due, too, 7,000l. to him there, if he knew how to get it paid, besides 2000l. that Mr. Montagu do owe him. As to his interest, he says that he hath had all the injury done him that ever man could have by another bosom friend that knows all his secrets, by Mr. Montagu; but he says that the worst of it all is past, and he gone out and hated, his very person by the King, and he believes the more upon the score of his carriage to him; nay, that the Duke of Yorke did say a little while since in his closett, that he did hate him because of his ungratefull carriage to my Lord of Sandwich. He says that he is as great with the Chancellor, or greater, than ever in his life. That with the King he is the like; and told me an instance, that whereas he formerly was of the private council to the King before he was last sicke, and that by the sickness an interruption was made in his attendance upon him; the King did not constantly call him, as he used to do, to his private council, only in businesses of the sea and the like; but of late the King did send a message to him by Sir Harry Bennet, to excuse the King to my Lord that he had not of late sent for him as he used to do to his private council, for it was not out of any distaste, but to avoid giving offence to some others whom he did not name; but my Lord supposes it might be Prince Rupert, or it may be only that the King would rather pass it by an excuse, than be thought unkind: but that now he did desire him to attend him constantly, which of late he hath done, and the King never more kind to him in his life than now. The Duke of Yorke, as much as is possible; and in the business of late, when I was to speak to my Lord about his going to sea, he says that he finds the Duke did it with the greatest ingenuity and love in the world; “and whereas,” says my Lord, “here is a wise man hard by that thinks himself so, and would be thought so, and it may be is in a degree so (naming by and by my Lord Crew), would have had me condition with him that neither Prince Rupert nor any body should come over his head, and I know not what.” The Duke himself hath caused in his commission, that he be made Admirall of this and what other ships or fleets shall hereafter be put out after these; which is very noble. He tells me in these cases, and that of Mr. Montagu’s, and all others, he finds that bearing of them patiently is his best way, without noise or trouble, and things wear out of themselves and come fair again. But, says he, take it from me, never to trust too much to any man in the world, for you put yourself into his power; and the best seeming friend and real friend as to the present may have or take occasion to fall out with you, and then out comes all. Then he told me of Sir Harry Bennet, though they were always kind, yet now it is become to an acquaintance and familiarity above ordinary, that for these months he hath done no business but with my Lord’s advice in his chamber, and promises all faithfull love to him and service upon all occasions. My Lord says, that he hath the advantage of being able by his experience to helpe and advise him; and he believes that that chiefly do invite Sir Harry to this manner of treating him. “Now,” says my Lord,” the only and the greatest embarras that I have in the world is, how to behave myself to Sir H. Bennet and my Lord Chancellor, in case that there do lie any thing under the embers about my Lord Bristoll, which nobody can tell; for then,” says he, “I must appear for one or other, and I will lose all I have in the world rather than desert my Lord Chancellor: so that,” says he, “I know not for my life what to do in that case.” For Sir H. Bennet’s love is come to the height, and his confidence, that he hath given my Lord a character, and will oblige my Lord to correspond with him. “This,” says he, “is the whole condition of my estate and interest; which I tell you, because I know not whether I shall see you again or no.” Then as to the voyage, he thinks it will be of charge to him, and no profit; but that he must not now look after nor think to encrease, but study to make good what he hath, that what is due to him from the Wardrobe or elsewhere may be paid, which otherwise would fail, and all a man hath be but small content to him. So we seemed to take leave one of another; my Lord of me, desiring me that I would write to him and give him information upon all occasions in matters that concern him; which, put together with what he preambled with yesterday, makes me think that my Lord do truly esteem me still, and desires to preserve my service to him; which I do bless God for. In the middle of our discourse my Lady Crew came in to bring my Lord word that he hath another son, my Lady being brought to bed just now, I did not think her time had been so nigh, but she’s well brought to bed, for which God be praised! and send my Lord to study the laying up of something the more! Then with Creed to St. James’s, and missing Mr. Coventry, to White Hall; where, staying for him in one of the galleries, there comes out of the chayre-room Mrs. Stewart, in a most lovely form, with her hair all about her eares, having her picture taking there. There was the King and twenty more, I think, standing by all the while, and a lovely creature she in this dress seemed to be. Thence to the ‘Change by coach, and so home to dinner and then to my office. In the evening Mr. Hill, Andrews and I to my chamber to sing, which we did very pleasantly, and then to my office again, where very late and so home, with my mind I bless God in good state of ease and body of health, only my head at this juncture very full of business, how to get something. Among others what this rogue Creed will do before he goes to sea, for I would fain be rid of him and see what he means to do, for I will then declare myself his firm friend or enemy.

22 Annotations

Terry F   Link to this

"-- besides his building and goods that he hath bought."

L&M have this in the Diary text, noting that the MS has "good goods".

Terry F   Link to this

Lots of pronouns. Here's what I propose:

"As to his interest, he [Sandwich] says that he hath had all the injury done him that ever man could have by another bosom friend that knows all his secrets, by Mr. Montagu; but he says that the worst of it all is past, and he [Mr. Montagu has] gone out [of Court] and hated, his [Mr. Montagu's] very person by the King, and he [Sandwich] believes the more upon the score of his [Mr. Montagu] carriage to him [Sandwich]; nay, that the Duke of Yorke did say a little while since in his closett, that he [York] did hate him [Nr. Montagu] because of his ungratefull carriage to my Lord of Sandwich."

Sandwich reports the King's hatred of Edward (Ned) Mountagu, believed to have flirted with the Queen, as Jeannine explains is this annotation on 20 May http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1664/05/20/#c12...

cape henry   Link to this

Nicely done, TF.

cape henry   Link to this

"...makes me think that my Lord do truly esteem me still, and desires to preserve my service to him..." With Sandwich's eyes fixed on the future, he turns to the one whom he knows he can rely on implicitly. Pepys, of course, takes it as a compliment - which it is - but it is also Sandwich doing what is best for Sandwich.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Sounds a little like whistling in the dark, all Sandwich's anxious attempts to convince Sam that he remains in highest favor. Increasingly isolated, sinking into debt...Of course success in the coming sea campaign could turn everything around.

Neat bit of surprise from our Lady Jem... Lets hope her husband will have the tact not to require her to meet his mistress' family anytime again soon.

***

Nothing like yesterday's near-death experience (career-wise) and a little pick-up in business and a few confidences and head-pats today to banish melancholy, eh Samuel?

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Deer Husband,

Once agan i writ ye frm this Hell that is Brampton. I do hop this dos find ye well and that all our affairs go well. I pray God ye be not troobled with ye wind and pains of the stomuck. Tell me if Father Jon Peeps be truely informed and ye wer told of dr. Burnet ye had an ulce sore on ye kidnys? Ye did not spk of that to me and this do leave me gravious frighted. Ye must take care, my Deer One, who is bothe Lover and Protecter to mee. Are ye keepin warm?

All is as beefor here. Yor father do be a most Unfaire man and compain mightily of me for my walks to the Greet house at Hinchinbroke and that what he do call "me Frenchie aires". Which is Most Unkinde. Yor mother do remain pretty crazy and Pall little bettor than she was Which is Most Cros and Curst. Stile, it is bettor than the yr last. A lessor degre of Hell as Mr. Dant wud say. I am beenin Civil as I can.

Did ye spk to me Lrd Sandwitch about our moneys? He shud return it to you. It be most Unkinde of him to abuse His Lessors so.

The garten here is quite pretty. The weader is warm. I do wish ye were here to walk with me by moons' lite. I miss ye and wud clap ye in me arms. Do writ me in me lonely condishon. Do take good care.

Your fond and loving wretch,

Bess

Michael Robinson   Link to this

"... Mrs. Stewart, in a most lovely form, with her hair all about her eares, having her picture taking there. ..."

For the Lely portrait see:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Frances_Tere...

This is one of the series of twelve 'Windsor Beauties' painted for the Dutches of York, circa 1662-5, and now hanging at Hampton Court. Oliver Millar, who thought on stylistic grounds that the Francis Stewart dated from the beginning rather than the end of the series, in L&M, notes that this could also be a sitting to Jacob Huysmans, who painted the alter piece in Catherine's chapel and was being promoted in the Queen's circle as an alternative to Lely. However in Hyusmans portrait of Frances Stewart she is dressed in a soldiers attire. Even on a day as busy as this I think SP would have found her clothing rather than than her hair remarkable - he was most impressed by the the legs of the stage actresses dressed in male attire, some time back!

Terry F   Link to this

MichaeR, Do you think her dewlaps might gave drawm Pepys's gaze down?

Michael Robinson   Link to this

"... and a lovely creature she in this dress ..."

If it had been the sitting to Huysmans, in male attire, I think SP would certainly have noted the legs!

" ... being most pleased to see the little girl dance in boy's apparel, she having very fine legs, ...."
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1663/02/23/

Australian Susan   Link to this

What an erotic and voluptuous portrait! If she really looked like this and was dressed like this, it is a wonder Sam could concentrate on anything.......

JWB   Link to this

Dewlaps?

If those are dewlaps
Da dewlap lap, da dewlap lap...

Perhaps you're aging her with your eyes.

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

"my mind I bless God in good state of ease and body of health"

What a difference a good Sandwich can make!

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Off me, ye louts!" a crash at which Pepys and Clarendon turn.

"Pepys. Good to see you've taken things in hand with this...gentleman." Deane frowns at the fuming Clarendon.

"Deane? What the devil...?" Sam's new-found secure content vanishing like the morning mist...

"Now see hear, your Earlship. You've no call, none at all to trouble honest men doing labor in the King's rightful business. Why Pepys and I are two such are as good as any man and we're not to be harassed and rounded by some fellow seeking to keep his own from the Nation's service in time of war. For shame, sir, for shame..."

Clarendon now brick red, unable to make reply...Yet...

"Deane...For God's sake..." Sam tries.

"Indeed for the Lord's sake, right ye are Pepys to invoke His name in such a matter. Why back when Mr. Pepys and I were faithful servants of the Commonwealth, sir...Such as your behavior would have landed a man in the Tower to face the upright judgment of..."

"Dear God, Deane!!"

"True, Brother Samuel, true...Dear God's judgment person personified in our gracious Lord Protector, Cromwell. Now there was an honest man who would stand for no man to place himself above the Nation's need. And you, sir...In time of war, when the Nation needs every ship we can build...And when only a few of us as left from the glorious days of Cromwell like Pepys and me standing to our duty...How can a man in your position dishonor himself so as to..."

If I impale myself on the gates now, Lord Sandwich might be able to save something of mine for Bess, Sam thinks.

"...Place King's Navy and Country in peril? Ah, look, Pepys..." Deane waves at the guards pouring in now. "Thugs come to do their master's bidding. Honest men to be silenced, the Nation to be left in..."

"And...You...Are...?" Clarendon chokes out.

"Anthony Deane, sir. Loyal servant of the Nation and its current leader, the King as it pleases God and the people. Have no fear, Pepys. Honest men acting in the way of truth need fear not steel nor..."

"My God, sir. You can say these things to me?" the Earl gasps.

"Magnificent, sir..." he beams. "Such as you are rare indeed. Guards! Release Mr. Deane, he has the King's business to do. My God, Deane, I shall recommend you for promotion and a knighthood."

Hmmn...Sam breathes again...

"Rather a contrast there, Mr. Pepys. I'm sorry to say I was not quite so impressed with you. However as long as the future Sir Anthony vouches for your diligence...I suppose we can keep you on."

"Ummn...Thanks to your Earlship."

"Yes...You may go. Come along, Deane." turns to Deane. "Thought the little fellow had a bit more spirit from Sandwich's account."

"He's been ill, sir." Deane notes kindly...

Bradford   Link to this

Re Mrs. Stewart's portrait: it's hard to tell---what's she holding in her left hand? A hand-mirror, or a sickle? She's hardly garbed as Ceres, goddess of grains &c., though the gown's color would suit.

Terry F   Link to this

""Now," says my Lord," the only and the greatest embarras that I have in the world is, how to behave myself to Sir H. Bennet and my Lord Chancellor, in case that there do lie any thing under the embers about my Lord Bristoll, which nobody can tell; for then," says he, 'I must appear for one or other, and I will lose all I have in the world rather than desert my Lord Chancellor: so that,' says he, 'I know not for my life what to do in that case.' For Sir H. Bennet's love is come to the height, and his confidence, that he hath given my Lord a character, and will oblige my Lord to correspond with him."

Sorry for the long citation. Bristol (George Digby) is still in disgrace after having attempted last July with Bennet's support and failed to impeach Edward Hyde the Earl of Clarendon, Lord High Chancellor.
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1663/07/07/

I can only imagine Sandwich hopes no secret about Bristol emerges that would further compromise Bennet, who's courting his confidence, and potentially aggravate Hyde Who Instills Fear against Sandwich.

---
Yes, JWB, I'm aging Frances Stewart's dewlaps with my eyes.

jeannine   Link to this

Terry, Thanks for your translation of above regarding Edward Moutagu-it makes sense to me. I was trying to determine if we ever figured out what exactly Edward Mountagu and Sandwich were at odds about. I went through both of the bios of Sandwich that I had and a book with a section on Mountagu but didn't see anything. What I did find was rather interesting about the overall politics of what we have seen regarding Sandwich going back to sea, so I thought I'd add that.

When Coventry sent Sam to ask Sandwich about going back to sea, Coventry was hoping that Sandwich would say no. Harris, in his bio, explains this and the last few weeks of activity surrounding Sandwich, which Sam may not be seeing. This is from F.R. Harris' "Life of Edward Mountagu: Earl of Sandwich" (slight spoilers):

" But though Sandwich was rightly piqued, because he had not been consulted as to the war, he determined to offer his services. He decided that it was wholly inconsistent with his honour, and with his reputation at Court, not to go with the fleet; so he sent Pepys to tell Coventry that he was most willing to receive any commands from the Duke, and to take charge of a small squadron.

His offer was none too well received, and Coventry inquired whether Pepys had told Sandwich that the Duke had not expected him to go, a fact of which Sandwich was aware. The rebuff rendered Pepys doubtful, and set him wondering whether the Duke looked upon the proposed squadron as too small and unworthy a command, or whether he really desired Sandwich out of the way. In reality the intrigues and jealousies were woven around a future question, that of the command of the whole fleet. James was himself extremely anxious to go to sea, but was inexperienced in naval matters. In addition, he was heir to the throne, and that stood in the way of his going. Other men had claims: Prince Rupert was experienced in a piratical kind of way; and there was Albemarle, who had been General-at-Sea in the Commonwealth navy, and had won a glorious victory over the Dutch. But Charles could not spare him nor risk so valuable a life. Two men, however, had sufficient experience -Sandwich and Penn. Though the former had never been in an actual battle, he had commanded off Mardky and Dunkirk, chased Turks in the Mediterranean, and bombarded Algiers. William Penn was a sailor by profession; he had served under Blake during the first Dutch War, and had fought in three important and successful engagements. In addition, such men had infinitely the greatest interest with the seamen, numbers of whom had been in the fleet during the Commonwealth, and who looked up to Albemarle, Sandwich, and Penn, as survivors of a great period. Of the last two named, Sandwich held the higher rank, and it was a natural that he should be called upon for service.

It is possible that his actual appointment owed something to the King, Charles was a good judge of naval matters; though he had not of late called Sandwich consistently to his private council; he had done so 'in business of sea and the like,' and when war was possible he paid him great attention; indeed, Sandwich thought "the King never more kind to him in his life than now". James, when once assured of the chief command, acted in a more friendly manner, and Sandwich was made Vice-Admiral. He received his commission to hold courts-martial, and was instructed to take into the Downs whatever ships could be collected, and keep the Duke of York informed of the size, strength and motions of the Dutch fleet, and preserve his majesty's honour. (pp. 266-267)

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

Jeannine, I think you'll find the cause of the Montagus' falling out here:
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1663/04/29/

Michael Robinson   Link to this

Mrs. Stewart's portrait: ---what's she holding in her left hand?

She is holding an ornamental bow by its center, you can make out the bow string; in this image the lower half of the bow is blending in with the foliage in the lower right corner of the canvas, the tip of the bow passing behind the dress.

So she might be chaste Diana, with the (male) viewer as the chased Acteon. (Charles would be familiar with the iconography from his time in exile at Fontainebleau where Henri II had includes numerous similar references to his mistress, Diane de Poitiers in the decoration)
http://www.wga.hu/art/m/master/fontaine/huntres...
[And for Terry F. to age with his eyes:-
http://www.wga.hu/frames-e.html?/html/m/master/... ]

jeannine   Link to this

Portraits of Frances Stuart

According to her biographer, Hartmann, who wrote "La Belle Stuart" in 1924, the link that Michael provided, which is a beautiful portrait (thanks Michael!) is most likely the link that Sam is referring to today. The 3 that appear in his book include the Lely one referred to above, another by Huysman (can not find a link anywhere on the web, but in the actual picture alas there aren't any legs showing) and one by Wissing and Van der Vaart http://images.npg.org.uk/OCimg/weblg/3/5/mw5963...

Frances was incredibly popular among the painters of the time which caused a great deal of irritation to a certain Lady Castlemaine, who was feeling somewhat ignored as the sun was now shining on the favor of La Belle Stuart. Hartmann devotes 9 pages of the appendix tracing the known portraits and miniatures and those that are named after Frances, but not necessarily confirmed to be her. Apparently the naming of paintings (as we've seen recently in the last auction of the Castelmaine vs. Nell Gwyn painting) was not exact. Also, several that sold to private owners, that were confirmed paintings are now sadly nowhere to be found from a public point of view, so now perhaps only descriptions still exist, at best.

language hat   Link to this

"I think you'll find the cause of the Montagus' falling out here"

That's a very long and confusing entry, so I may have missed something, but as far as I can tell Pepys describes the quarrel but does not give a cause:

"From ordinary discourse my Lord fell to talk of other matters to me, of which chiefly the second part of the fray, which he told me a little while since of, between Mr. Edward Montagu and himself, which is that after that he had since been with him three times and no notice taken at all of any difference between them, and yet since that he hath forborn coming to him almost two months, and do speak not only slightly of my Lord every where, but hath complained to my Lord Chancellor of him, and arrogated all that ever my Lord hath done to be only by his direction and persuasion."

jeannine   Link to this

Language Hat

I agree and that's exactly how I read it too. I understood THAT they argued, but not WHAT they argued about. I've never been able to figure that the cause of the intitial dispute. Nothing about the cause appears in any of the books that I have about Sandwich or Mountagu.

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

Right you (both) are. From what I read, and presumed, it was also a mystery to Sandwich and Sam -- perhaps only Edward knew? Maybe it has something to do with the "2000l. that Mr. Montagu do owe him" [Sandwich] ... after all, one of the reasons to neither a borrower nor a lender be is that "borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry" and sometimes causes resentment on the part of the borrower (which Mr. Montagu could be expressing toward Sandwich).

Log in to post an annotation.

If you don't have an account, then register here.