Friday 4 March 1663/64

Up, my eye being pretty well, and then by coach to my Lord Sandwich, with whom I spoke, walking a good while with him in his garden, which and the house is very fine, talking of my Lord Peterborough’s accounts, wherein he is concerned both for the foolery as also inconvenience which may happen upon my Lord Peterborough’s ill-stating of his matters, so as to have his gaine discovered unnecessarily. We did talk long and freely that I hope the worst is past and all will be well. There were several people by trying a new-fashion gun1 brought my Lord this morning, to shoot off often, one after another, without trouble or danger, very pretty. Thence to the Temple, and there taking White’s boat down to Woolwich, taking Mr. Shish at Deptford in my way, with whom I had some good discourse of the Navy business. At Woolwich discoursed with him and Mr. Pett about iron worke and other businesses, and then walked home, and at Greenwich did observe the foundation laying of a very great house for the King, which will cost a great deale of money.2 So home to dinner, and my uncle Wight coming in he along with my wife and I by coach, and setting him down by the way going to Mr. Maes we two to my Lord Sandwich’s to visit my Lady, with whom I left my wife discoursing, and I to White Hall, and there being met by the Duke of Yorke, he called me to him and discoursed a pretty while with me about the new ship’s dispatch building at Woolwich, and talking of the charge did say that he finds always the best the most cheape, instancing in French guns, which in France you may buy for 4 pistoles, as good to look to as others of 16, but not the service. I never had so much discourse with the Duke before, and till now did ever fear to meet him. He found me and Mr. Prin together talking of the Chest money, which we are to blame not to look after. Thence to my Lord’s, and took up my wife, whom my Lady hath received with her old good nature and kindnesse, and so homewards, and she home, I ‘lighting by the way, and upon the ‘Change met my uncle Wight and told him my discourse this afternoon with Sir G. Carteret in Maes’ business, but much to his discomfort, and after a dish of coffee home, and at my office a good while with Sir W. Warren talking with great pleasure of many businesses, and then home to supper, my wife and I had a good fowle to supper, and then I to the office again and so home, my mind in great ease to think of our coming to so good a respect with my Lord again, and my Lady, and that my Lady do so much cry up my father’s usage of her children, and the goodness of the ayre there, found in the young ladies’ faces at their return thence, as she says, as also my being put into the commission of the Fishery, for which I must give my Lord thanks, and so home to bed, having a great cold in my head and throat tonight from my late cutting my hair so close to my head, but I hope it will be soon gone again.

  1. Many attempts to produce a satisfactory revolver were made in former centuries, but it was not till the present one that Colt’s revolver was invented. On February 18th, 1661, Edward, Marquis of Worcester, obtained Letters Patent for “an invencon to make certeyne guns or pistolls which in the tenth parte of one minute of an houre may, with a flaske contrived to that purpose, be re-charged the fourth part of one turne of the barrell which remaines still fixt, fastening it as forceably and effectually as a dozen thrids of any scrue, which in the ordinary and usual way require as many turnes.” On March 3rd, 1664, Abraham Hill obtained Letters Patent for a “gun or pistoll for small shott, carrying seaven or eight charges of the same in the stocke of the gun.”
  2. Building by John Webb; now a part of Greenwich Hospital. Evelyn wrote in his Diary, October 19th, 1661: “I went to London to visite my Lord of Bristoll, having been with Sir John Denham (his Mates surveyor) to consult with him about the placing of his palace at Greenwich, which I would have had built between the river and the Queene’s house, so as a large cutt should have let in ye Thames like a bay; but Sir John was for setting it in piles at the very brink of the water, which I did not assent to and so came away, knowing Sir John to be a better poet than architect, tho’ he had Mr. Webb (Inigo Jones’s man) to assist him.”

21 Annotations

taotianone   Link to this

no matter what i do, in the new format the annotations are in a column down the left margin, and only one word wide. any suggestions beyond what has already been posted?

Alan Bedford   Link to this

I presume that you're using Firefox. Phil Gyford posted these instructions, which worked for me:

Go to this URL and then click the Refresh/Reload button in your browser: http://www.pepysdiary.com/style/default/global.css

Then try viewing the site again.

Alan Bedford   Link to this

"...a new-fashion gun1 brought my Lord this morning, to shoot off often, one after another, without trouble or danger, very pretty."

"Pretty" used here in the now-obsolete sense of "clever" or "ingenious" as has been previously discussed.

Terry F   Link to this

"On February 18th, 1661, Edward, Marquis of Worcester, &c."

A year ago were introduced to Edward Somerset, Marquis of Worcester, and his *Century of Inventions" of 1663, from which the quotation comes, by JWB http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1663/03/10/#c42911 . A month later, Nix quoted the DNB to the effect that, in multiple cases, Worcester was unable to give an account or show what he claimed to have invented or improved.
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1663/04/13/#c44293 .

The Letters are in Appendix B of the *Century* - http://www.archive.org/details/centuryofinventi...

Worcestor's pistol was an invention. L&M comment that the "new-fashion gun" brought Sandwich was probably by Abraham Hill.

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

A good day for Sam politically.

He seems to be back in his Lord's good graces, and the Duke call Sam to him for a "pretty while."

This bit about the Chest money seems troubling, though:
"which we are to blame not to look after"

Is it? Or am I reading it wrong?

cumsalisgrano   Link to this

Follow the money trail: the Chest was set up to take care of sick tars, this chest [vault]
snippets be in the tales of Parliament.
"...to inquire into Frauds in respect of Seamen's Rewards, &c. and what Moneys ought to have been set apart for the Chest since 24th June 1660,..."

Mony be like honey.....

From: 'Charles II, 1667 & 1668: An Act for taking the Accompts of the severall So[m]ms of Money therein menc[i]oned', Statutes of the Realm: volume 5: 1628-80 (1819), pp. 624-27. URL:
http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?com...

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...talking of my Lord Peterborough's accounts, wherein he is concerned both for the foolery as also inconvenience which may happen upon my Lord Peterborough's ill-stating of his matters, so as to have his gaine discovered unnecessarily."

Hmmn...

Gain? "Discovered unnecessarily", eh? That would be "inconvenient", wouldn't it boys? Especially if one were "helping" Lord P to draw up his accounts to allow for such "gain".

It's just so touching to see My Lord and our boy together again...United by this little matter. I can't help wondering if Creed's sudden drop in Sandwich's esteem is related.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Pepys...I must speak with you on a serious matter. my Lord Peterborough goes to the Tower this afternoon on charges of corruption regarding his Tangier accounts."

Ah...Ha, ha...ah... "To...The Tower, Mr. Coventry?"

"Yes. And I fear the matter may touch upon my Lord Sandwich. It seems his man Creed may have been involved in some manipulations of the Peterborough accounts to the benefit of his Lordship...I mean Lord Sandwich."

Ah...hha..Ah...

"You were...Close to Creed over the last year or two, weren't you, Pepys?"

"My Lord Sandwich requested I review some of his accounts, sir. Nothing to do with my Lord Peterborough's Tangier accounts of course, sir."

Gulp...

"A pity. I'm sure you could throw light on the matter. Still you may be summoned in the
case. Do try and remember anything you can, Pepys. It could be invaluable." Sighs. "I fear this may well take down one of England's finest commanders. Peterborough's no great loss but if Sandwich is implicated..."

No way out...No way out...Creed will sing like a canary...Why did I have to prove my usefulness to my Lord these last few?...I could have been openly cut by him, spurned...Safe. OH, God...My letter! It's sure to be...

"All of Creed's papers and correspondence have been seized...The Council will be reviewing everything tomorrow. I told them you would be happy to offer any information on Creed's activities you could."

Arrgh...Why did I have to insist on getting my proper cut now?!

***

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...the 'Change met my uncle Wight and told him my discourse this afternoon with Sir G. Carteret in Maes' business, but much to his discomfort,..."

I see Unc's infatuation with Bess hasn't affected his business sense.

I dunno Sam...I don't like l'affair Maes. There seems a whiff of something potentially very dangerous going on here somewhere.

"And did you not know, Mr. Pepys...This "sugar trader" Maes was in fact a top agent of the Bishop of Rome himself, that poisonous tyrant? And that your uncle was deeply involved in his espionage against this Island for the Papists?"

Ummn... "My Lord Shaftsbury, I...That was so long ago...My uncle just said he needed a little help with the irregularities in his sugar importing."

"Yes. I suppose as a Papist you were carefully rehearsed in what to say were you apprehended."

Patricia   Link to this

Help! since the renovation of the site, everyone's annotations are almost illegible to me, showing one word only per line. If you can advise me what to do (and I can decipher your advice) I would be so deeply grateful! I tried Alan Bedford's advice but it didn't help me, only confused me more.

Patricia   Link to this

Well! Posting a plea for help solved the problem for me! Nice new page and all.

Andrew Hamilton   Link to this

here being met by the Duke of Yorke, he called me to him and discoursed a pretty while with me about the new ship's dispatch building at Woolwich, and talking of the charge did say that he finds always the best the most cheape, instancing in French guns, which in France you may buy for 4 pistoles, as good to look to as others of 16, but not the service. I never had so much discourse with the Duke before,

What in the world is Jamie talking about? It must be very gratifying to Sam to be back in the good graces of Montague and Lady Sandwich; the attention from the Duke of York is icing -- what's going to be the effect on our man?

Mary   Link to this

the Chest money.

Sam and Prynne had both been appointed to the Commission that was charged with examining the (mal)administration of the Chatham Chest. The commission of enquiry had been set up in November 1662. It comprised 19 members, of whom Sam was to prove the most active.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Andrew, I think the Duke means as an example of his philsophy that the cheapest is often the best (Hmmn? A subtle attempt to urge economy on the Naval Office?) that you can buy a gun for 4 pistoles in France that's superior to one made for 16 pistoles by other countries' gunmakers. That's my guess, anyway.

"...and the same principle applies in many a field, Pepys." York continues. "For example, that fool brother of mine could have a fine mistress from either of our theatre houses for at least a quarter of what that viper Castlemaine is costing him."

Don't think I'll record that, Sam notes to himself.

***

Xjy   Link to this

After some days of confusion and e e cummings I worked out the flush cache advice. I'd rather be flush in cash like Sam, but at least it works again.

I think it looks good, and I'm looking forward to the extras to come in the right-hand column. As my first impression I'd say sleeker, cleaner, neater, faster. Not bad!

Well done, Phil, and thanks!

GrahamT   Link to this

"...best the most cheape, instancing in French guns, which in France you may buy for 4 pistoles, as good to look to as others of 16, but not the service."
I took this to mean that the best is cheapest in the long run. The French guns may look as good as ones costing 4 times the price, but they don't have the service life.

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

"and talking of the charge did say that he finds always the best the most cheape, instancing in French guns, which in France you may buy for 4 pistoles, as good to look to as others of 16, but not the service"

This threw me for a loop at first, too, but taking into account the possible double-meaning of the word "charge" (LH and others, was this true then?), I took it to mean that "the best [is] the most cheape" only when talking about the charge -- i.e., gunpowder. Certainly James couldn't be ignorant enough to think that the best-quality items are always the least expensive? (Although, that said, history does show that James was not a particularly intelligent man...)

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Graham, I think you're right on re-reading the quote.

Don McCahill   Link to this

I like the new format as well. The only suggestion I can make is that the diary itself also be moved to sans-serif type. Serif is harder to read online, and should be left for headings and the like.

Phil Gyford   Link to this

Thanks for your thoughts Don (and others), but it would be great if you could keep comments on the design to entries in the Site News section of the site, and keep the annotations relevant to the diary entries. Cheers.

Terry F   Link to this

The Royal Fishing Company - its logo

When organizing a company, the first order of business is a logo, in the 16th century, arms.

A little research reveals that they are "Barry wavy of six argent and azure; over all a fishing vessel of one mast sans sail or"
http://www.heraldsnet.org/saitou/parker/Jpgloss...

Now the enterprize can begin!

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