Monday 27 July 1663

Up in the morning about 7 o’clock, and after a little study, resolved of riding to the Wells to look for our dogg, which we did, but could hear nothing; but it being much a warmer day than yesterday there was great store of gallant company, more than then, to my greater pleasure. There was at a distance, under one of the trees on the common, a company got together that sung. I, at the distance, and so all the rest being a quarter of a mile off, took them for the Waytes, so I rode up to them, and found them only voices, some citizens met by chance, that sung four or five parts excellently. I have not been more pleased with a snapp of musique, considering the circumstances of the time and place,, in all my life anything so pleasant. We drank each of us, three cupps, and so, after riding up to the horsemen upon the hill, where they were making of matches to run, we went away and to Yowell, where we found our breakfast, the remains of our supper last night hashed, and by and by, after the smith had set on two new shoes to Creed’s horse, we mounted, and with little discourse, I being intent upon getting home in time, we rode hard home, observing Mr. Gauden’s house, but not calling there (it being too late for me to stay, and wanting their dog too). The house stands very finely, and has a graceful view to the highway. Set up our horses at Fox Hall, and I by water (observing the King’s barge attending his going to the House this day) home, it being about one o’clock. So got myself ready and shifting myself, and so by water to Westminster, and there came most luckily to the Lords’ House as the House of Commons were going into the Lord’s House, and there I crowded in along with the Speaker, and got to stand close behind him, where he made his speech to the King (who sat with his crown on and robes, and so all the Lords in their robes, a fine sight); wherein he told his Majesty what they have done this Parliament, and now offered for his royall consent. The greatest matters were a bill for the Lord’s day (which it seems the Lords have lost, and so cannot be passed, at which the Commons are displeased); the bills against Conventicles and Papists (but it seems the Lords have not passed them), and giving his Majesty four entire subsidys; which last, with about twenty smaller Acts, were passed with this form: The Clerk of the House reads the title of the bill, and then looks at the end and there finds (writ by the King I suppose) “Le Roy le veult,” and that he reads. And to others he reads, “Soit fait comme vous desirez.” And to the Subsidys, as well that for the Commons, I mean the layety, as for the Clergy, the King writes, “Le Roy remerciant les Seigneurs, &c., Prelats, &c., accepte leur benevolences.” The Speaker’s speech was far from any oratory, but was as plain (though good matter) as any thing could be, and void of elocution. After the bills passed, the King, sitting on his throne, with his speech writ in a paper which he held in his lap, and scarce looked off of it, I thought, all the time he made his speech to them, giving them thanks for their subsidys, of which, had he not need, he would not have asked or received them; and that need, not from any extravagancys of his, he was sure, in any thing, but the disorders of the times compelling him to be at greater charge than he hoped for the future, by their care in their country, he should be: and that for his family expenses and others, he would labour however to retrench in many things convenient, and would have all others to do so too. He desired that nothing of old faults should be remembered, or severity for the same used to any in the country, it being his desire to have all forgot as well as forgiven. But, however, to use all care in suppressing any tumults, &c.; assuring them that the restless spirits of his and their adversaries have great expectations of something to be done this summer. And promised that though the Acts about Conventicles and Papists were not ripe for passing this Session, yet he would take care himself that neither of them should in this intervall be encouraged to the endangering of the peace; and that at their next meeting he would himself prepare two bills for them concerning them. So he concluded, that for the better proceeding of justice he did think fit to make this a Session, and to prorogue them to the 16th of March next. His speech was very plain, nothing at all of spirit in it, nor spoke with any; but rather on the contrary imperfectly, repeating many times his words though he read all which I was sorry to see, it having not been hard for him to have got all the speech without book. So they all went away, the King out of the House at the upper end, he being by and by to go to Tunbridge to the Queen; and I in the Painted Chamber spoke with my Lord Sandwich while he was putting off his robes, who tells me he will now hasten down into the country, as soon as he can get some money settled on the Wardrobe. Here meeting Creed, he and I down to the Hall, and I having at Michell’s shop wrote a little letter to Mr. Gauden, to go with his horse, and excusing my not taking leave or so much as asking after the old lady the widow when we came away the other day from them, he and I over the water to Fox Hall, and there sent away the horse with my letter, and then to the new Spring Garden, walking up and down, but things being dear and little attendance to be had we went away, leaving much brave company there, and so to a less house hard by, where we liked very well their Codlin tarts, having not time, as we intended, to stay the getting ready of a dish of pease. And there came to us an idle boy to show us some tumbling tricks, which he did very well, and the greatest bending of his body that ever I observed in my life. Thence by water to White Hall, and walked over the Park to St. James’s; but missed Mr. Coventry, he not being within; and so out again, and there the Duke was coming along the Pell-Mell. It being a little darkish, I staid not to take notice of him, but we went directly back again. And in our walk over the Park, one of the Duke’s footmen came running behind us, and came looking just in our faces to see who we were, and went back again. What his meaning is I know not, but was fearful that I might not go far enough with my hat off, though methinks that should not be it, besides, there were others covered nearer than myself was, but only it was my fear. So to White Hall and by water to the Bridge, and so home to bed, weary and well pleased with my journey in all respects. Only it cost me about 20s., but it was for my health, and I hope will prove so, only I do find by my riding a little swelling to rise just by my anus. I had the same the last time I rode, and then it fell again, and now it is up again about the bigness of the bag of a silkworm, makes me fearful of a rupture. But I will speak to Mr. Hollyard about it, and I am glad to find it now, that I may prevent it before it goes too far.

45 Annotations

TerryF   Link to this

"a snapp of musique"

snap[p]. n. bite, snack, small meal; attack.
(Select Glossary)

TerryF   Link to this

In the House of Lords (much as Pepys recalled it)

Speaker of H. C. Speech.
http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?com...

Bills Passed
(read by the the Clerk of the Crown with the customary phrases of assent in French to public and private bills, nearly as Pepys reports, read by the Clerk of the Parliaments)
http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?com...

King's Speech.
http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?com...

'House of Lords Journal Volume 11: 27 July 1663', Journal of the House of Lords: volume 11: 1660-1666, pp. 575-80. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?com.... Date accessed: 27 July 2006.

Bradford   Link to this

I'm sure we've been told why the bills are accepted en français, but perhaps I am not alone in wishing to be told again.

"His speech was very plain, nothing at all of spirit in it, nor spoke with any; but rather on the contrary imperfectly, repeating many times his words though he read all which I was sorry to see, it having not been hard for him to have got all the speech without book."
Even teleprompters will not turn some later sovereigns into orators, Sam.

Patricia   Link to this

I'm with you Bradford--why ARE the bills accepted en français?

Pepys' letter to Gauden "Many thanks for the loan of your horse, which is here returned. P.S. We lost your dogg."

Poor Sam has hemorrhoids! Maybe caused by straining at stool.

I saw silkworm cases once and they're not very big--none of the ones I saw were even 2" long. Everything you ever wanted to know about silkworms here: http://insected.arizona.edu/silkinfo.htm

TerryF   Link to this

"about the bigness of the bag of a silkworm"

Methinks that's about as big as a hulled walnut (an ovoid as long as 1 1/16 inches = 2.7 cm or so).

Australian Susan   Link to this

Poor little lost dog. Hope it found a good home.

En francais. The medieval spoken language of government was Norman French - is this why? (Medieval English Govt. written lang. was Latin).

Dave   Link to this

Law French

Pepys lived in the last days of "Law French", the corrupt French used in the English courts, generally spoken only by lawyers. Corrupt, because all French pronunciation is thought to have been lost, and it is further believed that Law French was essentially incomprehensible to speakers of standard English as well as standard French.

It is theorized that Law French allowed lawyers to keep their clients in the dark. Whether they spoke Law French in Parliament, I don't know.

TerryF   Link to this

Dave, interesting info about Law French -

In the U.S.A. Law Latin is essentially incomprehensible to speakers of standard English as well as those of us with some classical or medieval/ecclesiastical Latin. They say "Sigh-knee-Dye".

TerryF   Link to this

"We drank each of us, three cupps, and so, after riding...we went away and to Yowell, where we found our breakfast"

Nary a mention of a bush or hedge for turning up a tail or two.

jeannine   Link to this

Boy Sam has truly fallen apart since Elizabeth has left. I wonder how she'd react to ....

1. His fooling around with Mrs. Lane? Perhaps the oh so trendy de jour "public apology" (ie. Christie Brinkley and Peter Cook, and other media manias) would suffice along with a lot of wooing her, a new wardrobe, some jewelry, etc......

2. Wayneman's departure... perhaps fidning some "hunky" young lad to replace him would serve her fancy...

3. Losing the family pet.... this would fall into the category of "You can run but you can't hide" if it happened in our house, but I'm not sure how pets were viewed by Sam and his crowd.

Doesn't look like he's held down the fort very well while she's been away!

TerryF   Link to this

More about Law French and what I termed Law Latin:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Law_French

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_legal_Lati...

----
jeannine, the dog was presumed to be Mrs. Gauden's. I doubt its loss would have been mentioned in a letter since it wandered off, as it did from him. Hardly lax, Sam rode some miles in speed, inquired about, and did what he could to find it out.

dirk   Link to this

French legalese translated

"Le Roy le veult." = The King desires it.

"Soit fait comme vous desirez." = It be done as you wish.

"Le Roy remerciant les Seigneurs, &c., Prelats, &c., accepte leur benevolences." = The King, thanking the Lords, etc., Prelates, etc., accepts their benevolences.

TerryF   Link to this

"the horsemen upon the hill...making of matches to run" -

Was this the feature of the gathering at Epsom that presaged the Derby, whose "first recorded race took place in 1661?" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epsom_Derby

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Tomorrow...

"Pepys..."

"Why, Mr. Gauden, what a pleasant..."

"Where the hell's our dog, Pepys?!"

"Dog, my dear Gauden, what...Dog?"

"My girl saw the dog chasing after you and Creed the other day, Pepys! My wife's cried for two days straight! We want the dog, Pepys! Remember, I have powerful friends...And some other friends here in town you'd prefer not to meet!"

"Gauden, dear fellow...All this over a little black..."

"So you did take him! Where is he?! Sydney!! Here, boy!!!"

"Gauden, please. Now, a little black dog did chase us after we left your place...Some little distance. It might have been yours, it might not...What are you doing?"

Gauden holding a large sheath of papers...

"The contract for the Tangier account...Your little gratuity..." Gauden begins tearing the sheets in two. "History!...And the same goes for Creed! And speaking of things we value..." Tosses Pepys a ribbon.

"Why this is my Bess'...How the devil did you...?"

"As I say...I have some friends you'd rather not be meetin'. Now, if you ever want to see the rest of her again...I'd better be seein' me little Sydney by tonight. Intact."

***

Aqua salis Etnae   Link to this

"...We drank each of us, three cupps..." Not all innards get the same wonderful result. 'Tis doctoring be 10% science and the rest be an art form,maks money for Harley street and Old wives tails [else check DNA for the correct code].

Aqua   Link to this

Illuminating piece of protocol. "...And in our walk over the Park, one of the Duke’s footmen came running behind us, and came looking just in our faces to see who we were, and went back again. What his meaning is I know not, but was fearful that I might not go far enough with my hat off, though methinks that should not be it, besides, there were others covered nearer than myself was, but only it was my fear..."
After Inspection , to R.H.Jimmy, "Your Highness It be that Clerk from Seething Lane, not a Leveller or a Shaking Quaker" RH "Do not call out, the guard, My man , no harm be done,cannot have the Clerk of the Acts for 3 weeks in the Tower and then Navy will be without Tar and Biscuits."

Aqua   Link to this

Thank ye Patricia," Poor Sam has hemorrhoids! Maybe caused by straining at stool." No wonder he wanted 5 Gallons? of magna diluted.

Aqua   Link to this

Things be dear, for 2 days outing , 20s, he sayeth, Spas never be cheap, fun be always like that. "...he [ Creed] and I over the water to Fox Hall, and there sent away the horse with my letter, and then to the new Spring Garden, walking up and down, but things being dear and little attendance to be had we went away, leaving much brave company there..."

smith   Link to this

" took them for the Waytes,"
The reference to which this is linked describes a family named Wayte, but isn't it more likely Sam thought they were the town musicians, or Waits, as described here:

http://www.btinternet.com/~alan.radford/waits.htm

Aqua   Link to this

Language be used to inform, it be also be used to confuse those that be required to taken for a ride. '
Tis why the English lingua be rich in words.
Dictionarys have a minimum of 100,000 entries and up and us poor munckins can only remember a few thousand at best and fake the rest.
Horice in Ars poetica, 23 doth say "when I work to be simple I become obscure"
Brevis esse laboro obscurus fio

Aqua   Link to this

Mr Smith: The Large Glossary concurs, Waytes be Municipal Musicians [also spelt waits]

Stolzi   Link to this

It seems that on the whole, despite the hemorrhoid and the loss of the dogg, Sam's had a perfectly marvelous day.

Musicke, the best he remembers of that kind; store of gallant company; Codlin tarts; a wonderfully flexible tumbler; and a chance to get into Parliament and bask right up close to the Speaker and to Royalty itself - a real red letter day. Lots of "best I ever" in this entry.

While Bess taps her foot, out being bored at Brompton...

Bergie   Link to this

Hemorrhoid? You think? Sam's description suggested a boil or a cyst.

Kilroy   Link to this

Can't imagine a 'roid the size of an almond. Less being able to bear one with such indifference.

I'd say it is what Bergie suggests. How often does Sam "shift" his undies?

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"His speech was very plain, nothing at all of spirit in it, nor spoke with any; but rather on the contrary imperfectly, repeating many times his words though he read all which I was sorry to see, it having not been hard for him to have got all the speech without book."

Now if Charles could just imagine Parliament as a woman he was trying to have his way with...

"No..." Castlemaine comments from wherever she is... "He was pretty much the same way in dealing with us. But unlike Parliament we got more out of him than he did from us."

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Brampton, July 27...

"Deer Husband,

Your Luv...Loving Wife sends Her Greetings. Brampton remains a true Hell of Boredom. I am still Most Abused by my Cruel Jailer, your Father who has Refused to allow my Visits to Lady Jem to be more than Once in a Week.
He has now been Angr'd by my and Ashwell's slipping out the Window the other day and Escaping for a Visit to my Lady, who was Most Kind and did ask of you, my Deer Husband in Most Kind Words. She is Saddened by her Husband, my Lord's Unexplained Absence, tho her visit to London and Meeting with him there did Cheer her Heartily.
I was Pleased to Heer good Speech of You, my Deerest One by Her, my Lady. All at Court who speak of ye, speak Well of ye and your Dilig...Devotion to your Work, she says. As I say, your Father was much Angr'd by our Fleeing his Most Cruel and Tyrannical Prison and may Write to you of it. I hope you will Agree that it is my Duty to Pay Attendance on our Most Kind Lady and that your Loving Wife should be free to take what Little Pleasure she can during her Stay in Hell.

Husband...I Heer some News which has Disquieted my Hart. Some have Spoken roundly while heer of your taking of Much Pleasure while at Home...Alone. I would not Deny you a Pleasant Time, Deerest One but your Loving Wife would Hope You are not Endul...("Indulging, Mrs. Pepys." Ashwell notes.)Indulging in Things and Persons not fit for a Loving Husband. Think on your Poor Wretched Wife in her Sufferings in Hell and take Pity.

I must give this to Capt. Ferrers who has been kind enough to pay your Poor Wife a Call while visiting my Lady. As always, a most Merry Fellow who Speaks well of you. (When he speaks of you, Ashwell frowns to herself in her review. If Mr. Pepys could see him flirting with her...)

Oh, and my Loneliness has now been Somewhat lessened by the Coming of a most Sweet Little Black Dog just this Day. Your Father says the Poor Dog must have Travelled many Weary Miles to us. I hope you will let me keep him, he is much like our old dog Tho he does not ... in the House or so we Think as your Most Cruel Father put him Out last nite.

Forgive Scratchings, Pall has Stolen my best Quills.

Your Loving Bess.

Xjy   Link to this

"darkish"
Anyone feel like checking on the use of this very modernish-feeling suffix in past English?

Martin   Link to this

In the matter of the dogg...
Sam passes Mr. Gauden's, "it being too late for me to stay, and wanting their dog too" --- the lateness of the hour sounds like a cover story; losing the dog would seem to be the principal problem. In any event "it being too late" seems strange -- it's mentioned right after breakfast and the shoeing of Creed's horse.

A. De Araujo   Link to this

"a little swelling to rise just by my anus"
methinks Hemorrhoids with a blood clot;
a little incision would expel the clot and provide immense relief.

Glyn   Link to this

Unlike Robert Gertz, I think Pepys and Creed can safely deny any knowledge of the dog. True it followed their horses, but it could have stopped doing that immediately they got out of sight of the house, so far as the owners know. Although I do understand why Pepys didn't want to call in on them on his way home.

But let's hope that the dog did fin its own way home, as it probably did, if only to put Judith Boles' and Clement's minds at rest!

TerryF   Link to this

Doggone

Two days ago it was said
Sam is a notorious dognapper,methinks he did it twice before!:)
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1663/07/25/#c58679

Does anyone else recall (1) any dognapping (when the spaniel came along its owner's ID was noted as a need for care with it) (2) notoriety?

Patricia   Link to this

I only remember the one incident, here:
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1661/08/07/
He became notorious among the annotators for wishing to steal that dog.

TerryF   Link to this

So, Patricia, he committed dognappery in his heart, which has been deemed (by some, per Matt. 5:21-28) as good as to have done the deed.

Bradford   Link to this

Terry, you mean "sigh-knee-dye" for "sine die"? O tempora, o mores.

The exact size of the protrusion would matter little while posting on horseback, making even this marvelous day a marathon. No Preparation H then, either.

TerryF   Link to this

Bradford, I've heard it myself, both live and on the tube. I confess I was clueless until an attorney friend explained what was meant. Sad indeed.

Australian Susan   Link to this

Shifting or shifts

This means changing his clothes.

The Dog

This was described as a spaniel and therefore quite an expensive little thing - spaniels had been made popular by the Royal family (cf corgis) and were THE breed to own, so I think not only would Mrs G be upset at the loss of her companion, but Mr G would probably have paid quite a lot for it and thus be rather annoyed at its loss.

Aqua   Link to this

Pepys be cavalier about a K. Charles, a water one be better for getting James' game, the ladies of the court made the tiny ones famous, because they used for home entertainment waiting for the call to chambers.

Spaniels come in two styles Ladies & Gents or Toy [Lap] or working.

The one Sam lost, fits this Description."Sussex the longest and lowest of the Spaniel breeds ....Its striking characteristics include its massive head and bone, long body, strong, short legs, a rolling gait and a happy tail. These traits made the Sussex ideal for its original purpose as a gentleman's flushing spaniel operating in heavy undergrowth."
lifted

language hat   Link to this

"Terry, you mean “sigh-knee-dye” for “sine die”? O tempora, o mores."
"Sad indeed."

You guys seem to be unaware that you're describing the traditional anglicized pronunciation of Latin, which has been around for centuries. It's the reconstructed "authentic" pronunciation that is the modern innovation. If you're going to complain about tempora and mores, it's "see-nay dee-ay" that you should be pointing at.

Miriam   Link to this

I am so very glad I came to school today,
And how should one pronounce "Nolo contendere"?

umidus totus   Link to this

It be no contest, wot be writ be not that be rote, see:
http://www.ai.uga.edu/mc/latinpro.pdf
Peer pressure be thy guide. Some rules be universal. Your future audience be the decider.

DrCari   Link to this

Sam's swelling in the perianal region is likely inflammation of his old incision. San's surgical incision from his "cutting for the stone" never healed entirely. He has frequently complained of swelling, pain and drainage following long periods in the saddle or riding great distances. (In Sam's day surgeons made the incision for male bladder stone removal in the perianal region.)

Harvey   Link to this

Medical Latin is even more separated from anything Cicero would have understood... 'prn' being abbreviation of 'pro re nata' translating to 'if required'. And another 50 or so similar abbreviations. "Maintain the mystery, maintain the fees."

Pedro   Link to this

“So they all went away, the King out of the House at the upper end, he being by and by to go to Tunbridge to the Queen;”

Antonia Fraser (King Charles II)…

So the relationship between Clarendon and the King was not entirely easy, for all the jocularity of their scribbled exchanges within the Privvy Council itself:

Clarendon to the King on the proposed visit to Tunbridge Wells: “I suppose you will go with a light train”

Charles: “I intend to take nothing but my night bag.”

Clarendon: “Yes, you will not go without forty or fifty horse.”

Charles: “I count that part of my night bag…”

Italian charms   Link to this

I was hoping for a great book on fashion and style. This blog ignores that issue. It's much more of a "me, my glamorous life and friends" with a dash of usable information. Not worth the time unless you like that sort of thing.

Italian charms   Link to this

I was hoping for a great book on fashion and style. This blog ignores that issue. It's much more of a "me, my glamorous life and friends" with a dash of usable information. Not worth the time unless you like that sort of thing.

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