Thursday 5 July 1660

This morning my brother Tom brought me my jackanapes coat with silver buttons. It rained this morning, which makes us fear that the glory of this great day will be lost; the King and Parliament being to be entertained by the City to-day with great pomp.1

Mr. Hater was with me to-day, and I agreed with him to be my clerk.

Being at White Hall, I saw the King, the Dukes, and all their attendants go forth in the rain to the City, and it bedraggled many a fine suit of clothes. I was forced to walk all the morning in White Hall, not knowing how to get out because of the rain.

Met with Mr. Cooling, my Lord Chamberlain’s secretary, who took me to dinner among the gentlemen waiters, and after dinner into the wine-cellar. He told me how he had a project for all us Secretaries to join together, and get money by bringing all business into our hands.

Thence to the Admiralty, where Mr. Blackburne and I (it beginning to hold up) went and walked an hour or two in the Park, he giving of me light in many things in my way in this office that I go about. And in the evening I got my present of plate carried to Mr. Coventry’s.

At my Lord’s at night comes Dr. Petty to me, to tell me that Barlow had come to town, and other things, which put me into a despair, and I went to bed very sad.

  1. July 5th. His Majesty, the two Dukes, the House of Lords, and the House of Commons, and the Privy Council, dined at the Guildhall. Every Hall appeared with their colours and streamers to attend His Majesty; the Masters in gold chains. Twelve pageants in the streets between Temple Bar and Guildhall. Forty brace of bucks were that day spent in the City of London.

    — Rugge’s Diurnal. — B.

22 Annotations

vincent   Link to this

J Evelyn says a little differently. "...I saw his Majestie go with as much pompe & splendor as any Earthly prince could do to the greate Citty feast: (The first they invited him to since his returne) but the exceeding raine which fell all that day, much eclips'd its luster: This was at Guild-hall, and there was also all the Parliament men, both Lords & Comm: the streetes adorn'd with Pageants &c: at immense cost:"

Mary   Link to this

'my jackanapes coat'
According to L&M Vol.1 Glossary, this is a monkey-jacket, i.e. a short, close-fitting jacket.

chip   Link to this

According to Webster's seventh, the derivation is from Jack Napis, nickname for William de la Pole, d. 1450, duke of Suffolk. Odd but the entry mentions the monkey, ape part but no mention of a jacket. Second meaning is 'an impertinent or conceited fellow' and b, a 'pert or mischievous child.' Sam is lucky to be the son and brother of a tailor as he certainly needs finer clothes to mingle at court. I wonder if he is paying in full for these clothes (as he mentioned a few weeks ago) or just the material. A few days ago, he worried about being able to afford them.

helena murphy   Link to this

In spite of Sandwich's reassurance against all the world, the mention of Barlow's reappearance in town leads Sam to despair,but if a king can lose his head, Sam can lose his job.

Paul Brewster   Link to this

Jackanapes, n per OED
"Precise origin uncertain.
So far as yet found, the word appears first as an opprobrious nickname of William de la Pole, Duke of Suffolk (murdered 1450), whose badge was a clog and chain, such as was attached to a tame ape. Hence, in a poem of 1449 ..., in which other noblemen are denominated by their badges or heraldic emblems, as the Swan, fiery Cresset, Portcullis, Wheat-ear, etc., Suffolk is styled the "Ape-clogge", and in somewhat later satirical invectives is referred to as an ape, and entitled Jack Napes; this being inferentially already a quasi-proper name for a tame ape, as it is seen to be in 1522. (The converse hypothesis, that Suffolk was for some other reason called "Jack Napes", and that this nick-name was transferred from him to the ape, does not, on a review of the facts, seem probable.) But of Jack Nape or Napes, and its relation to an ape or apes, no certain explanation can be offered; it was perhaps, in its origin, merely a playful or whimsical name for a tame ape, and the n- might arise as in nunckle and neye (birds-nie, pigs-ney), or as in the by-names Ned, Noll, Nell, and the -s might be in imitation of the -s of surnames such as Jakkes, Hobbes, Symmes, etc., already in use, so that "Jack Napes" parodied a human name and surname. If this was the standing of the name, it is easy to understand that it might never attain to literary use, till it became the nick-name of Suffolk. Be this as it may, the fact remains that Jack Napes is the earliest form, of which Jack-a-Napes, Jack of Napes (? Naples), Jack-an-ape, Jack-and-apes, are later perversions, app. attempts of "popular etymology" to make the expression more intelligible. In accordance with this view, the original sense is here taken as "ape", of which the use in [quasi-proper name, applied to the Duke of Suffolk] is treated as a derived application, though it is in point of date the earliest use that has come down to us, and may possibly, with further evidence, have to stand first.”

Paul Brewster   Link to this

Jackanapes, continued
The OED includes today's entry as a supporting quote for the attributive usage of the word. I've quoted the entry below. It's interesting that the SP quote is the only one where jackanape is applied to an inanimate object. So I believe we've in effect looped back on ourselves. I'm not sure that we can say if SP has a specific type of coat in mind or he's just just using it in the sense that one might describe a piece of a men's formal attire as a "monkey suit" today.

"1598 Shakes. Merry W. i. iv. 113 You, Iack 'Nape: giue-'a this Letter to Sir Hugh, by gar it is a shallenge I will teach a scuruy Iack-a-nape Priest to meddle, or make.

1622 Massinger & Dekker Virg. Mart. ii. i, All my fear is of that pink-an-eye jack-an-apes boy, her page.

1660 Pepys Diary 5 July, This morning my brother Tom brought me my jackanapes coat with silver buttons.

1813 M. Edgeworth Patron. (1832) I. iii. 44 The squire declared that he would not be brow-beat by any jackanapes colonel.

1881 Besant & Rice Chapl. of Fleet ii. xvii, Any jackanapes lawyer might think it fine thus to insult a harmless nobleman."

chip   Link to this

Thanks Paul Brewster for the OED work. Perhaps jackanapes was the zoot suit, or dressed to the nines, or monkey suit, or tux or whatever of the day. I found it interesting that using the OED to parse Pepys, you found they had parsed him previously!

vincent   Link to this

"Jackanapes" play on words, Some publick school wallers call the little boys room La Jacques (john or loo to rest of the world) nape is that area of neck,
therefore in an around about way, He was known as a royal pain in the neck. As Suffolk was considered a little behind the times along his cottage (Audley end house) it would fit jack and his ape would be a real pain in the nape of the neck.

j a gioia   Link to this

my jackanapes coat with silver buttons

i've never seen an organ grinder and monkey but up until they disappeared (in the u.s. after ww2) the monkies were generally depicted wearing little hats and jackets. given the length of 17th century costume, i wonder if sam has not bought what today would be called a blazer or sport coat.

Paul Brewster   Link to this

Jackanapes, continued
Pepys will use the term on only one other occasion (from a scan of the Gutenburg text) and I was fascinated to see the term used as the name of some sort of place to stay.

"So away home to the office, and thence home, where little Mrs. Tooker staid all night with us, and a pretty child she is, and happens to be niece to my beauty that is dead, that lived at the
Jackanapes, in Cheapside." February 20th, 1666

My Google search turned up no other information on this inn(?).

vincent   Link to this

"...and I (it beginning to hold up) went and walked an hour or two in the Park,..." I'm guessing the rain held off?

vincent   Link to this

"...who took me to dinner among the gentlemen waiters, and after dinner into the wine-cellar..." Was this a 18th century description, for it sounds so modern? At first I had the impression he was at the "DO"(at the Guildhall) but he was compensated at Whitehall by Mr. Cooling, my Lord Chamberlain’s secretary.

Bill   Link to this

The 5th of July the City of London invited the King and the two Princes his brothers, the great Officers of the Crown, and both Houses of Parliament to an Entertainment, which, in Magnificence, was answerable to the Riches of the City which gave it, and the Quality of the Persons who were invited to it.
---The History of England. Mr. de Rapin Thoyras, 1731.

Bill   Link to this

JACKANAPES, a Coxcomb, an Impertinent.
---An Universal Etymological English Dictionary. N. Bailey, 1675

Jackanapes, a little insignificant Fellow
Dictionarium Britannicum. N. Bailey, 1736.

... they tell him he's a Jackanapes, a Rogue, and a Rascal.
---Table-Talk. J. Selden, 1689.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Pepys is getting his new position outfitted very quickly: yesterday the first look at the Navy Office and his first "boy" servant arrived; and "Mr. Hater was with me to-day, and I agreed with him to be my clerk." A most happy appointment!
http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/1026/

Dick Wilson   Link to this

In the footnote it says "Forty brace of bucks were that day spent in the City of London." Does anyone know what this means? If a "brace of bucks" means a "pair of male deer", how are they "spent"? Anyway, male deer do not come in pairs, or braces, and in season, they try to kill each other.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Dick Wilson, given what precedes, sc. "His Majesty, the two Dukes, the House of Lords, and the House of Commons, and the Privy Council, dined at the Guildhall. Every Hall appeared with their colours and streamers to attend His Majesty; the Masters in gold chains. Twelve pageants in the streets between Temple Bar and Guildhall" might we read "Forty brace of bucks were that day [fed them all] in the City of London." -- as though the bucks were fungible, which they were!

william wright   Link to this

"spent" normally means the animal, fish, or whatever has spawned. Maybe it
meant that they had been culled after the rut.

Tonyel   Link to this

" he had a project for all us Secretaries to join together, and get money by bringing all business into our hands."
Middle management wasting no time in organising some mutual nest-feathering. 'Twas ever thus - and still is, of course.

E   Link to this

Dick Wilson et al.: Spent---expended, used up. See "spend," in dictionaries.

Venison was served, and in quantity.

Chris Squire UK   Link to this

‘jackanapes, n. Etym: Precise origin uncertain. So far as yet found, the word appears first as an opprobrious nickname of William de la Pole, Duke of Suffolk (murdered 1450), whose badge was a clog and chain, such as was attached to a tame ape. Hence, in a poem of 1449 . . Suffolk is styled ‘the Ape-clogge’, and in somewhat later satirical invectives is referred to as an ape, and entitled Jack Napes ; this being inferentially already a quasi- proper name for a tame ape, as it is seen to be in 1522 . .

. . 6. attrib.
a1616 Shakespeare Merry Wives of Windsor (1623) i. iv. 103 You, Iack 'Nape: giue-'a this Letter to Sir Hugh, by gar it is a shallenge..I will teach a scuruy Iack-a-nape Priest to meddle, or make.
. . 1660 S. Pepys Diary 5 July (1970) I. 193 This morning my brother Tom brought me my Jackanapes coat with silver buttons.’ [OED]

Chris Squire UK   Link to this

‘spent, adj. 1. a. Of material things: Expended, consumed, used up completely.
a1616 Shakespeare Henry VI, Pt. 1 (1623) ii. v. 8 These Eyes, like Lampes, whose wasting Oyle is spent, Waxe dimme.
1632 W. Lithgow Totall Disc. Trav. vii. 329 The..cause of our Arriuall here, was in regard of our fresh Water that was spent.
1664 H. Power Exper. Philos. i. 34 When the Liquor wherin they swim is almost spent and dried up.’

[OED]

Deer breed in the autumn rutting season, after which they are indeed culled. These bucks were surplus young males, unable to defeat the top stags for a share of their harems.

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