Annotations and comments

william wright has posted 16 annotations/comments since 16 February 2013.

The most recent…


Comments

About Saturday 31 August 1661

william wright  •  Link

"to take the gilt off the gingerbread"

In the boat building world that I inhabit, taking the gilt of the gingerbread comes from
docking large ships. Masters would show their seamanship and boat handling skills
whilst docking. Get this manouver wrong and hit the dock or mostly another ships
rigging that you were laying up against was considered bad seamanship.
Resulting in "Taking the gilt off the gingerbread."

About Sunday 21 April 1661

william wright  •  Link

"Doing a Foreigner" Being in the building trade for over 55 years I have heard the phrase,
but not often. We use the phrase "doing a homer" this means using someone from the
trade that you want to employ who works for someone else. These people will work for
you at a reduced rate therefore taking trade away from the guvnor. If caught it usually
meant the sack.

About Friday 15 March 1660/61

william wright  •  Link

Re Baltic tar. I restore old wooden boats alongside another old boat builder and we still use "Stockholm Tar" on certain joints for and aft. This tar allow the boat to take a bit of a hit when say tying up and do not leak as it stays flexible. A lot of tar was also sourced from America for use on our navy ships, and most of it came from Carolina, hence the name of Tar Heels for people from that part of the world.

About Saturday 23 February 1660/61

william wright  •  Link

RE HANSA.
My home town of King's Lynn mentioned by SP a short while ago has the only
remaining Hansa building in the whole of the UK. It stands on the South quay
on the river Gt Ouse.

About Monday 18 February 1660/61

william wright  •  Link

My mother was a tweeny at Lord Kitchener's gaff early 20th century and her
wages were £10 per annum. Six and a half day week, and had to buy two
uniforms out of that. Things had not moved very far in 300 years.

About Thursday 31 January 1660/61

william wright  •  Link

I work as a volunteer in the maritime museum which is on the footprint of the old fort overlooking the dock in King's Lynn. I have always known of the ship and its cargo but never been able to find any records of it. Bishop's Lynn before it was King's Lynn.

About Thursday 5 July 1660

william wright  •  Link

"spent" normally means the animal, fish, or whatever has spawned. Maybe it
meant that they had been culled after the rut.