Annotations and comments

Dick Wilson has posted 132 annotations/comments since 18 February 2013.

The most recent…

About Friday 29 March 1661

Dick Wilson   Link to this

I would have assumed, that had the King or Duke wished to dispatch two vessels upon His Majesty's Secret Service, that the entire Navy Board would have been consulted, and fully informed from the outset. I presume that the admiralty would prepare the sailing orders for the Captains, select the captains, and the ships. But the Board should know full details, so they can provide follow-on forces, replacements, supply ships, whatever the mission requires. This procedure does not bode well, for this or future operations.

About Wednesday 27 March 1661

Dick Wilson   Link to this

I like these descriptive collectives. Why not 'A noise of children in the house', or 'A noise of family come to call'.

About Friday 8 March 1660/61

Dick Wilson   Link to this

"Homely" is one of those words that can get you in trouble in a hurry. British English: Warm, friendly, comfortable, familiar, pleasant. American English: Plain, drab, dull, uninteresting, slapped upside the head with a ugly stick. So to say of a woman, that she is homely, can be a high compliment or a low insult. Handle with care.

About Friday 15 February 1660/61

Dick Wilson   Link to this

Diana's question defies accurate answer, so here's a try at an inaccurate one. Using Vincent's price of 2 pounds 10 and 3 per (troy) ounce of gold in Sam's day, his 350 pounds could have bought 139.3 ounces. That could be sold today (Feb. 2014) for $183,416.31 in US Dollars. That's a good solid base of savings for an upper middle class household, but nowhere near enough for retirement. Also, the US did not really have a national currency until the Lincoln Administration. Prior to that, every bank printed its own money.

About Thursday 7 February 1660/61

Dick Wilson   Link to this

Dueling was so hard to stamp out that even today, in Kentucky, part of the oath of office for any office, however minor, is a statement that you have never sent or accepted a challenge or acted as a second. The governor, every police officer, city councilman, attorney, justice of the peace, everybody, must so swear. Ladies, too.

About Thursday 31 January 1660/61

Dick Wilson   Link to this

I had some cousins called by their middle names because both brothers had the first name Samuel. My grandfather called them "First and Second Samuel".

About Monday 21 January 1660/61

Dick Wilson   Link to this

Bligh was a superb navigator -- sailing a longboat to Timor proved that. But later, assigned to a land post in Australia, guess what, he provoked another mutiny. Royal Naval officers were expected to be gentlemen, not just by birth, but in character and behavior.

About Saturday 19 January 1660/61

Dick Wilson   Link to this

Lyn Believeau raises a question: How many of us keep diaries? Watch out. Here is another word that separates British and American English. What an American Businessman would call an "Appointments Calendar", a British Businessman calls "A Diary". When one uses the word "Diary", the other may misunderstand. It is common office practice on both sides of the pond to keep a schedule of upcoming appointments, work that should be done today, deadlines etc., and at days end, to annotate them to record actions completed or which scheduled tasks were not completed. Filed away, they thus become a record of both expected events and completed events. SP's form of Diary is a whole lot more fun. In the future, will people using electronic "organizers" or "day planners" use them to keep records of who did what, when, where and how? Will the technology to read their files survive?

About Sunday 13 January 1660/61

Dick Wilson   Link to this

I'll bet that the seamen were mightily disappointed that they didn't get to join in a monster brawl. These men, confined aboard ship, are turned out in the nighttime. They pour ashore and are issued clubs and are all keyed up to have some fun. "Let's go get 'em!" But then " 'em " turns out to be a half dozen drunks who ran past the guards and are now long since gone. Turn in the handspikes? Go back aboard ship? What a let down!

About Tuesday 11 December 1660

Dick Wilson   Link to this

Bill: One of the annotators mentioned "Camels". Those are not dromedaries. They are floodable floats, that could be lashed to the side of a ship and pumped dry. They would then heave the vessel out of the mud. They were most commonly used to help ships get over shallow spots, sand bars and the like, and could help refloat a ship that ran aground. I suppose they might be used to help the Assurance. Did the ship capsize at night? The disorientation of people caught below decks, and December water temps, and the tendency of non-swimmers to panic when their faces go underwater, could easily drown a score of men. The Costa Concordia, the cruise ship that ran aground and capsized off the Italian coast, lost 32 people, with half the ship above water. Tragic.