Wednesday 4 July 1660

Up very early in the morning and landing my wife at White Friars stairs, I went to the Bridge and so to the Treasurer’s of the Navy, with whom I spake about the business of my office, who put me into very good hopes of my business. At his house comes Commissioner Pett, and he and I went to view the houses in Seething Lane, belonging to the Navy, where I find the worst very good, and had great fears in my mind that they will shuffle me out of them, which troubles me.

From thence to the Excise Office in Broad Street, where I received 500l. for my Lord, by appointment of the Treasurer, and went afterwards down with Mr. Luddyard and drank my morning draft with him and other officers. Thence to Mr. Backewell’s, the goldsmith, where I took my Lord’s 100l. in plate for Mr. Secretary Nicholas, and my own piece of plate, being a state dish and cup in chased work for Mr. Coventry, cost me above 19l. Carried these and the money by coach to my Lord’s at White Hall, and from thence carried Nicholas’s plate to his house and left it there, intending to speak with him anon. So to Westminster Hall, where meeting with M. L’Impertinent and W. Bowyer, I took them to the Sun Tavern, and gave them a lobster and some wine, and sat talking like a fool till 4 o’clock. So to my Lord’s, and walking all the afternoon in White Hall Court, in expectation of what shall be done in the Council as to our business. It was strange to see how all the people flocked together bare, to see the King looking out of the Council window.

At night my Lord told me how my orders that I drew last night about giving us power to act, are granted by the Council. At which he and I were very glad. Home and to bed, my boy lying in my house this night the first time.

11 Annotations

Glyn   Link to this

The Bridge in today's entry would be "London Bridge" because it is the only one in London, surprisingly enough. And if you click on the link to "White Friars stairs" you'll see examples of the boats that the couple must have used. Elizabeth may have gone part of the way with Sam to visit her father-in-law, who lived nearby.

Nix   Link to this

The houses in Seething Lane --

Samuel will be moving from Westminster, near the kingm at Whitehall, into London -- indeed, to the opposite end of London, close to the Tower. Obviously he is on the rise politically and economically -- but would the new housing be better or worse than the accommodation in Axe Yard?

Jenny Doughty   Link to this

'It was strange to see how all the people flocked together bare, to see the King looking out of the Council window.' I presume this means bare-headed, having removed headwear as a sign of respect.

vincent   Link to this

"...he and I went to view.." new digs, Quite chuffed I do believe if Nowt goes wrong. But must make sure, he does his part with the presenting of the Gift.(the 19 quids worth of gold plate, 8 months old salary)
".. where meeting with M. L’Impertinent and W. Bowyer, I took them to the Sun Tavern, and gave them a lobster and some wine, and sat talking like a fool till 4 o’clock.."
Are The Lawyer 'feller' again, very good to get his advice, He who hides behind his mask of buffoonary. He always there when SP needs him, it so seems. All that case of nerves in case that Bowyer has a trick up his worn out sleeve. "Tis time of tension, SP does not count his chicks until they are hatched (well most times except when it comes to New 'Duds')

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

re: The houses in Seething Lane (with special bonus section on lobsters!)

Nix asks "would the new housing be better or worse than the accommodation in Axe Yard?" According to Tomalin, the housing is much better ... and, over the next few weeks we'll get the added benefit of watching Sam maneuver to get the house he wants, in ways that she calls "both entertaining and shameful." For all of his "great fears" about his situation, Sam does go after what he wants with a stunning singlemindedness.

Lunchtime lobster: It seems that the lobster they would have had for lunch was probably what Americans know as the Maine-style lobster (big, meaty claws), rather than the spiny (or rock) lobster, where the tail meat is the main source of the meal ... all I could find on this was at http://www.hatchery.freeserve.co.uk/

helena murphy   Link to this

Such is the mystique of monarchy if all Charles has to do is look out of the Council window to draw the crowds!

vincent   Link to this

From J Evelyn july 3 "..I went to Hide-park where was his Majestie & aboundance of Gallantrie:..."
4th: "..I heard Sir Sam: Tuke harangue to the house of Lords, in behalfe of the Ro: Catholicks: & his account of the transaction at Colchester about the Murdering of my Lo: Capel, and the rest of those brave men, that suffered in cold bloud, after Articles of reddition &c:..."
Helena Murphy : "mystique of monarchy "
"tis the daddy figure that we all seek so doubting of our efforts, who save us all?"

Paul Brewster   Link to this

Mr. Luddyard/Ruddyard/Ruddiard
The Gutenburg spelling is correct per Wheatley but according to L&M this is Mr. Ruddyard. In the L&M Companion he is identified as [Thomas] Ruddiard, Teller to the Excise Commissioners.

Bill   Link to this

"cup in chased work "

ENCHASING, Inchasing, or Chasing, the art of enriching and beautifying gold, silver, and other metal-work, by some design, or figures represented thereon, in low relievo. Enchasing is practised only on hollow thin works, as watch-cases, cane-heads, tweezer cases, or the like. It is performed by punching or driving out the metal, to form the figure, from within side, so as to stand out prominent from the plane or surface of the metal.
---A New and Complete Dictionary of Arts and Sciences. 1763.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

New digs and a footboy! -- " my boy [Will] lying in my house this night the first time."

Tonyel   Link to this

" where I received 500l. for my Lord, by appointment of the Treasurer, and went afterwards down with Mr. Luddyard and drank my morning draft with him and other officers. "
This does seem to confirm that Sam has no fears about carrying a large amount of gold into the pub - although, when he collects the plate, he takes the precaution of hiring a coach.

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