Monday 22 June 1668

Up, and with Balty to St. James’s, and there presented him to Mr. Wren about his being Muster-Master this year, which will be done. So up to wait on the Duke of York, and thence, with W. Coventry, walked to White Hall good discourse about the Navy, where want of money undoes us. Thence to the Harp and Ball I to drink, and so to the Coffee-house in Covent Garden; but met with nobody but Sir Philip Howard, who shamed me before the whole house there, in commendation of my speech in Parliament, and thence I away home to dinner alone, my wife being at her tailor’s, and after dinner comes Creed, whom I hate, to speak with me, and before him comes Mrs. Daniel about business … She gone, Creed and I to the King’s playhouse, and saw an act or two of the new play [“Evening’s Love”] again, but like it not. Calling this day at Herringman’s, he tells me Dryden do himself call it but a fifth-rate play. Thence with him to my Lord Brouncker’s, where a Council of the Royall Society; and there heard Mr. Harry Howard’s noble offers about ground for our College, and his intentions of building his own house there most nobly. My business was to meet Mr. Boyle, which I did, and discoursed about my eyes; and he did give me the best advice he could, but refers me to one Turberville, of Salsbury, lately come to town, which I will go to. Thence home, where the streets full, at our end of the town, removing their wine against the Act begins, which will be two days hence, to raise the price. I did get my store in of Batelier this night. So home to supper and to bed.


18 Annotations

Terry Foreman  •  Link

The ellipsis above suggests handy Pepys is on the prowl again; L&M confirm it:

"...and after dinner comes Creed, whom I hate, to speak with me, and before him comes Mrs. Daniel about business and yo did tocar su cosa with mi mano. She gone, Creed and I to the King's playhouse...."

Terry Foreman  •  Link

. "Thence [to] a Council of the Royall Society; and there heard Mr. Harry Howard's' [ http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/10586/ ] noble offers about ground for our College, and his intentions of building his own house there most nobly."

Records of the meeting in *The history of the Royal Society of London ...", Volume 2 By Thomas Birch http://goo.gl/hm1W7

(Howard's proposals were not carried out.)

Chris Squire  •  Link

‘muster-master, n.
a. An officer in charge of the muster roll of part of an army . . a person responsible for the accuracy of a muster roll.
1548 in Cal. State Papers: Domest. (1870) Add. 379 Instructions by the Lord Protector and Council for John Brende, muster master in the Northern parts.
. . 1622 F. Markham Five Decades Epist. of Warre iv. i. 122 Muster-Masters‥are very odious vnto Captaines; for in seruing of his Prince truly, and in mustering stricktly he wipeth much vndue profit from the Captaine.
. . 1667 S. Pepys Diary 18 Jan. (1974) VIII. 19 A letter from the Duke of York, commanding our payment of no wages to any of the muster-maisters of the fleet.

mustermastership n. Obs.
1665 S. Pepys Diary 12 Mar. (1972) VI. 54 We talked also of getting W. How to be put into the Muster-maistershipp in the room of Creed.’ [OED]

Robert Gertz  •  Link

Whenceforth this "hate", Sam? We knew you didn't like Creed and didn't trust him but loved his discourse and his sharp mind. Anything to do with Povy's prediction of "greatness" for Creed yesterday?

Jenny  •  Link

Imposition upon Retailers of Wines, Brandies, Spirits, and Strong Waters.

The Commons assembled in Parliament for the supply of your Majesties present Occasions have given and granted and by these Presents doe give and graunt unto your most excellent Majestie the Su[m]m of Three hundred and ten thousand pounds to be raised and levied upon the vending and retailing of Wines and other the Liquors hereafter mentioned in manner following and doe most humbly beseech your Majesty that it may be enacted and be it enacted by the Kings most excellent Majesty by and with the advice and consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal and [of (fn. 1) ] the Commons in this present Parliament assembled and by the authoritie of the same That all Vintners Taverners Wine Coopers Merchants or any other person or persons who do or shall utter or sell by way of Retaile any French Wines Spanish Wines or other Wines whatsoever between the four and twentieth day of June One thousand six hundred sixty eight and the four and twentieth day of June which shall be in the yeare of our Lord One thousand six hundred and seaventy And alsoe all and every the Strong water men Distillers and all and every other person and persons which do or shall utter or sell by way of Retail any imported Brandies or other Spirits and alsoe Strong waters [either or any of them & alsoe all Brandies or other Spirits and alsoe Strong waters (fn. 1) ] any or either of them made of Wine or Lees of Wine or any other Materials imported between the Four and twentieth day of June in the yeare of our Lord One thousand six hundred sixty eight and the Four and twentieth day of June which shall be in the yeare of our Lord One thousand six hundred and seventy shall yeild and pay unto your Majesty the Rates and Duties herein after following that is to say

Robin Peters  •  Link

"but met with nobody but Sir Philip Howard, who shamed me before the whole house there, in commendation of my speech in Parliament,"
Would this, in modern parlance read "who embarrassed me"?

Geoff Hallett  •  Link

I was in Cambridge on Tuesday and spent an hour, it is only open an hour morning and afternoon in Pepys library in Magdelene College. It gives a real feel of the time and events that we read about every day. The 3,000 books in the presses is an impressive sight. Every one beautifully bound and with gold embossing. Two diaries are on display, one opened at the final page. Interesting to see in the hundreds of panes of glass in the presses the small imperfections present in the glass manufacture of the time. Spoke at length with the keeper of the library and a very occasional annotator from Canada.

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"Calling this day at Herringman’s, he tells me Dryden do himself call it but a fifth-rate play."

Henry Herringman was Dryden’s publisher and apparently an honest man.

Terry Foreman  •  Link

To add to Jenny's helpful provision of the executive summary of the excise tax about to come into force, wherefore Pepys finds "the streets full, at our end of the town, removing their wine against the Act begins, which will be two days hence, to raise the price."

'Charles II, 1667 & 1668: An Act for raising Three hundred and ten thousand pounds by an Imposition on Wines and other Liquors.', Statutes of the Realm: volume 5: 1628-80 (1819), pp. 630-635. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?comp…

pepfie  •  Link

Tocando continuamente las cosas poco a poco el Señor Pepys me está tocando los cojones.

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

'Charles II: June 1668', in Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1667-8, ed. Mary Anne Everett Green (London, 1893), pp. 418-468.
http://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers…

@@@
June 22. 1668
Post warrant for M. Rov de Marcilly
to be furnished with 2 horses and a guide to go to any port in Great Britain and return.
Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 30, f. 37.]

June 22. 1668 Pass for M. Rov de Marcilly
to go beyond seas and return.
Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 30, f. 37.]

For the story of Roux de Marcilly, see https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1668/03/14/#c550…

@@@
June 22. 1668
Carlisle [Sir Phil. Musgrave to Williamson.]

That I might give you some account of Scotland,
I went to Jedburgh, where all the gentry of Teviotdale met to settle the militia of that shire.

They appointed 2 troops of horse and 2 regiments of foot for the shire, one of each to be commanded by the Duke of Monmouth, the other troop by Lord Carr, and the other regiment of foot by Lord Roxburgh;
they appointed all the officers from the grand Presbyterians;
the number of the militia of the nation will be 16,000 or 20,000 horse and foot.

Honest men refused commands, pretending business.

The reason alleged for settling the militia is to prevent the insurrection of the fanatics;

Galloway and other places are not permitted to have any militia, which is a great trouble to them.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 241, No. 227.]

Sir Philip Musgrave MP is Governor of Carlisle. He is acting on a report from an informant, see https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1668/06/15/#c553…

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

June 22. 1668
The Monmouth, Downs.
Sir Thos. Allin to the Navy Commissioners.

The Nightingale, having spared a month's provision to Sir Wm. Jennings, has not above 5 days' aboard.

Desires a speedy supply from Dover for the time she shall stay out.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 241, No. 214.]

See Jennings report at
https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1668/06/04/#c553…

@@@
June 22. 1668
Woolwich Ropeyard.
Wm. Bodham, clerk of the ropeyard, to [Sam. Pepys].

Sir John Shaw has been speaking ill of the Woolwich officers for telling the truth, and also of the Board.
Sir John contracted in April 1667 to serve in 100 tons of the best Flanders hemp by 31 July following, and failed of performance;
in November he proffered it and was refused, the contract being nulled by himself, and the goods scarce worth half the price first agreed on.

On this he supplicated his Majesty and the Duke of York, and by some allegations and pretences, got an order to serve it in;

I had it examined, and finding not one ton in 5 the best, and 16 tons out of 34 tons cast by as refuse, I would not take in any more without further directions.

I have suffered many menaces from Capt. Low for refusing, and Sir John by letter bade me beware lest he go to the King;
I persisted however, and resolved, if their Honours would not screen me, to forfeit my place rather than my integrity.

Details of correspondence with Sir John about taking back the hemp, the price, &c. I have had more trouble and vexation about this pitiful parcel of stuff than I have known in 4 years amongst 200,000/. worth from others.
[3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 241, No. 216.]

FOR MORE ABOUT THIS, SEE
https://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/5304/

@@@
June 22. 1668
Standon.
Walter Lord Aston to Williamson.

I thank Lord Arlington for promising to move his Majesty in my behalf;
I think it will not displease the King, whose father was so satisfied of my loyalty that he was pleased to honour me with a letter under his own hand, wherein he said, "The greatest of my misfortunes are that I cannot reward such a gallant and loyal subject as you are, as I ought and would."

I will never fail in my zeal of serving, and my family having continued twenty-two descents in Staffordshire, it has given me some interest there, which shall be at his lordship's disposal when he pleases to command it.

Not being publicly employed, I offer to sound persons of divers persuasions and interests. A friend of mine is to be employed to Spain.

The old Earl of Bristol and my father often complained of Spanish delays and encroachments, which should now be redressed.
[S.P. Dom., Car II. 241, No. 225.]

The story of Sir Walter Aston Snr. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Aston,_1st_L…

The story of Sir Walter Aston Jr,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Aston,_2nd_L…

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

Young widow Mrs. Daniels seems to be auditioning for a position. When Pepys saw her last, in March, the first time in many months:

"... in Seething Lane met young Mrs. Daniel, and I stopped; and she had been at my house but found nobody within, and tells me that she drew me for her Valentine this year; so I took her into the coach, and was going to the other end of the town, thinking to have taken her abroad; but remembering that I was to go out with my wife this afternoon, I only did hazer her para tocar my prick con her hand which did hazer me hazer; and so to a milliner at the corner shop. ..."
L&M text. https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1668/03/25/

Nicolas  •  Link

“Mrs. Daniel looks like a spaniel” — Dylan Thomas

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

Thanks, Nicholas: I was hoping for a copyable version so no one would have to transcribe.

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

"My business was to meet Mr. Boyle, which I did, and discoursed about my eyes; and he did give me the best advice he could, ..."

"Robert Boyle still sanctioned the use of dried excrement, blown into the eyes for the treatment of cataracts."
Run, Pepys, run ...
https://www.historyextra.com/period/renaissance/c…

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