Monday 20 April 1668

[The first part of the entry for April 20th is among the rough notes, and stands as follows: “Monday 20. Up and busy about answer to Committee of Accounts this morning about several questions which vexed me though in none I have reason to be troubled. But the business of The Flying Greyhound begins to find me some care, though in that I am wholly void of blame.” This may be compared with the text.]

Up betimes and to the getting ready my answer to the Committee of Accounts to several questions, which makes me trouble, though I know of no blame due to me from any, let them enquire what they can out. I to White Hall, and there hear how Henry Brouncker is fled, which, I think, will undo him: but what good it will do Harman I know not, he hath so befooled himself; but it will be good sport to my Lord Chancellor to hear how his great enemy is fain to take the same course that he is. There met Robinson, who tells me that he fears his master, W. Coventry, will this week have his business brought upon the stage again, about selling of places, which I shall be sorry for, though the less, since I hear his standing for Pen the other day, to the prejudice, though not to the wrong, of my Lord Sandwich; and yet I do think what he did, he did out of a principle of honesty. Thence to Committee of Accounts, and delivered my paper, and had little discourse, and was unwilling to stay long with them to enter into much, but away and glad to be from them, though very civil to me, but cunning and close I see they are. So to Westminster Hall, and there find the Parliament upon the Irish business, where going into the Speaker’s chamber I did hear how plainly one lawyer of counsel for the complainants did inveigh by name against all the late Commissioners there. Thence with Creed, thinking, but failed, of dining with Lord Crew, and so he and I to Hercules Pillars, and there dined, and thence home by coach, and so with Jack Fenn to the Chamberlain of London to look after the state of some Navy assignments that are in his hands, and thence away, and meeting Sir William Hooker, the Alderman, he did cry out mighty high against Sir W. Pen for his getting such an estate, and giving 15,000l. with his daughter, which is more, by half, than ever he did give; but this the world believes, and so let them. Thence took coach and I all alone to Hyde Park (passing through Duck Lane among the booksellers, only to get a sight of the pretty little woman I did salute the other night, and did in passing), and so all the evening in the Park, being a little unwilling to be seen there, and at night home, and there to W. Pen’s and sat and talked there with his wife and children a good while, he being busy in his closet, I believe preparing his defence in Parliament, and so home to bed.


22 Annotations

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Commons Journal

Irish Land Adventurers.

The House then, according to former Order, resumed the Hearing of the Cause upon the Petition of the Adventurers for Lands in Ireland:

And the Parties complaining, and Counsel on both Sides being called in; and the Petition read;

Mr. Perian Poole, offered as a Witness on the Behalf of the Petitioners, was objected against, being a Fortynine Officer [ http://goo.gl/qSbjG ]: Which being debated;.... http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?comp…

Terry Foreman  •  Link

The "Irish Land Adventurers" are claiming lands that are legitimately theirs were redistributed to others by the regime of the Lord-Lieutenant Ormand at the behest of his patron, Lord Clarendon. (Of course, the late Lord Chancellor and therefore Ormond, were doing the bidding of the King.)

language hat  •  Link

The Hercules Pillars pub was in Fleet Street, and it seems like a good idea to remind everyone of this quote from the annotations:

"How thoroughly the highway deserved the name of 'tipling street' may be inferred from the fact that its list of taverns included but was not exhausted by the Devil, the King’s Head, the Horn, the Mitre, the Cock, the Bolt-in-Tun, the Rainbow, the Cheshire Cheese, Hercules Pillars, the Castle, the Dolphin, the Seven Stars, Dick’s, Nando’s, and Peele’s."

Carl in Boston  •  Link

and so all the evening in the Park, being a little unwilling to be seen there, and at night home
Doubtless our Sam was wearing nothing but a a raincoat and wide brim hat, hanging around a lamp on the corner, "only to get a sight of the pretty little woman I did salute the other night".

Frank  •  Link

With Sam sitting there seemingly a friend of the household and now a name to be reckoned with in Parliamentary inquiries, it seems strange that W.Pen holed up in his closet and did not ask him to cast an eye over a draft of Pen's outline for defense. Or did Pen enter his retreat with strict instructions that he was not to be disturbed, doing so prior to Sam's arrival? And Sam, only too deferential to Sir William's orders. I think R.Gertz is missing an opportunity here.

Robert Gertz  •  Link

"Well?"

"My God...I'm saved...How can I ever thank you?"

"Don't mention it, Admiral Sir Will...I do it for Sam'l all the time."

"And to think you interrupted your summer vacation...Oh, my dear Mrs. Pepys."

"William?"

"Yes?"

"Mr. Pepys is still here...Even Will Jr. is getting antsy. Can you not spare just a moment...For our sakes?"

Bess desperately shakes head...Please, the one thing I ask...

"Sorry, not now. Tell him I'll see him in the office tomorrow."

"Lord..." Lady Penn, grumbling...

"Thanks...It would break Sam'l's heart if he thought anyone knew..." Bess, gratefully...

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"Up and busy about answer to Committee of Accounts this morning about several questions "

L&M: These mostly concerned Sandwich's prize goods and Pepys's privateer.

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"Mr. Perian Poole, offered as a Witness on the Behalf of the Petitioners, was objected against, being a Fortynine Officer"

Presumably the objection is to his having been involved in the execution of Charles I on Tuesday 30 January 1649 (Old Style, i.e., Julian calendar).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Execution_of_Charle…

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"I did hear how plainly one lawyer of counsel for the complainants did inveigh by name against all the late Commissioners"

L&M: I.e. those appointed under the acts of settlements to adjudicate in the land disputes in Ireland.

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"and so with Jack Fenn to the Chamberlain of London to look after the state of some Navy assignments that are in his hands,"

L&M: Presumably Treasury orders had been assigned to Chamberlain (Sir Thomas Player, sen.) on which he was trying to raise money on behalf of the navy.

Terry Foreman  •  Link

" meeting Sir William Hooker, the Alderman, he did cry out mighty high against Sir W. Pen for his getting such an estate, and giving 15,000l. with his daughter, which is more, by half, than ever he did give;"

L&M: See https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1667/02/16/

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

The whereabouts of the French fleet continues to be of interest:

April 20. 1668
Pendennis. [CORNWALL]
Fras. Bellott to Williamson.

The Milford frigate reports De Beaufort’s being before Belle isle, with 16 men-of-war and other vessels.
The Milford and Francis are to cruize off this coast.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 238, No. 155.]

'Charles II: April 1668', in Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1667-8, ed. Mary Anne Everett Green (London, 1893), pp. 320-369. British History Online
http://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers…

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

This seems to be a case of closing the stable door after the horse has just won the Derby:

April 20. 1668
Whitehall
Warrant from Lord Arlington to Andrew Crooke and 5 others, with a constable and some messengers,
to search any house, shop, or printing room, supposed to contain scandalous or unlicensed books, or books imported contrary to law;
to seize them, make the presses unserviceable, and bring the offenders before himself, or a justice of peace;
the master and wardens of the Stationers’ Company and other officers to assist therein.
[S.P. Dom., Entry Book 30, f. 29.]

'Charles II: April 1668', in Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1667-8, ed. Mary Anne Everett Green (London, 1893), pp. 320-369. British History Online
http://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers…

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

The property puzzle which is Ireland continues to unravel:

The King [Charles II] to Ormonde
Written from: Whitehall
Date: 20 April 1668
Shelfmark: MS. Carte 43, fol(s). 659
Document type: Original [with record of enrolment]

William Atkinson, grandson & heir of Anthony Atkinson, deceased, to have a grant, in due form, of certain lands (herein described & particularized) in the King's County in Ireland formerly intended by King Charles I, to have been granted to the then representatives of the aforesaid Anthony Atkinson, deceased, in reward of his loyal services.

Included therein:
The King [Charles I] to [Lord Privy Seal and Secretary of State Lucius Cary, 2nd Viscount] Falkland
Written from: Westminster
Date: 14 December 1628
Shelfmark: MS. Carte 43, fol(s). 659r-v
Document type: Copy

Directs the passing of Letters-Patent, containing a Grant of certain lands in the King's County, to Michael Laxton, of Carngort in the said County, esquire, and Mary his wife, late the widow & executrix of Anthony Atkinson.

@@@

Ossory to Ormonde
Written from: [Dublin]
Date: 20 April 1668
Shelfmark: MS. Carte 220, fol(s). 378-379
Document type: Holograph

A Proclamation by the Lord Deputy and Council has been issued extending the session of the Commissioners of Claims until July 10th. But it is not probable that the work will be then completed.
The writer hears that "my Lord of Clanricarde's estate will be demanded for the purposes of the Act, he having not made proof of innocency; as also Mr Luttrell's, notwithstanding his proviso".
It is desirable that the work of the Commission should be completed, prior to the calling of a Parliament. Hence the delay in determining the time for the latter.
In the event of the appointment of a Commission for the Revenue, recommends as fit to be Commissioners, Lord Aungier [afterwards, Earl of Longford], Lord Kingston, Nic. Jones, Sir E. Dering, and Mr. Page.

@@@

Breviate of a Bill for the suppression of Conventicles and of seditious meetings
Date: [20 April?] 1668
Shelfmark: MS. Carte 81, fol(s). 312

https://wayback.archive-it.org/org-467/2019110714…

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

In the first annotation today, Terry gave the House of Commons notes on the Irish Land Adventurers, and whether or not to hear testimony of Mr. Perian Poole.

Terry missed that they came back in the afternoon to continue the conversation:

Admissibility of a Witness.
The House proceeded in the Debate (adjourned) concerning Mr. Poole's being admitted a Witness.
The Question being put, That Mr. Poole be admitted a Witness;
The House was divided:
The Yeas went out.
Tellers,

Mr. Weld, for the Yeas, 79.
Mr. Whorwood,
Sir Fran. Clarke, for the Noes, 77.
Mr. Pleydall.
And so it was resolved in the Affirmative.

The Parties and Counsel on both Sides being then called in; the House proceeded to the Examination of the said Mr. Poole, and several other Witnesses, on the Petitioners Behalf.

The Petitioners tendered the Speech of Sir Audley Mervin, Speaker of the House of Commons in Ireland, dated the Thirteenth of February 1667, to be read in this Cause; which being objected against; the House debated the same.
Resolved, &c. That the said Speech shall be read.
Resolved, &c. That the further Hearing of this Cause be adjourned till Thursday next.

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

"There met Robinson, who tells me that he fears his master, W. Coventry, will this week have his business brought upon the stage again, about selling of places, which I shall be sorry for, though the less, since I hear his standing for Pen the other day, to the prejudice, though not to the wrong, of my Lord Sandwich; and yet I do think what he did, he did out of a principle of honesty."

A surprise to Pepys, apparently, that Coventry will tell the truth under oath, and not sell out a colleague in service to a Lord.
Usually people judge others by their own behavior, so this gives me pause to wonder how much Pepys shades the truth.

Seems to me Pepys learned last year that Coventry and Penn had a code so the other would know how they felt about their correspondence. Can't find the citation now ... maybe the next time around ... anyone else know what I'm referring to? If my memory is correct, it would indicate that Coventry had a higher regard for Penn's opinions than Pepys understood.

Stephane Chenard  •  Link

Coventry and Penn, these two knaves, of course they have a secret code, which was indeed exposed on May 21 last:

*****************
Mrs. Turner do tell me that my Lady and Pegg have themselves owned to her that Sir W. Coventry and Sir W. Pen had private marks to write to one another by, that when they in appearance writ a fair letter in behalf of anybody, that they had a little mark to show they meant it only in shew: this, these silly people did confess themselves of him. (https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1667/05/21)
*****************

"Him" being, presumably, Thomas Turner the general clerk, and now all the women know, and whisper knowingly over their chocolate (or laundry baskets, as their station may dictate). Silly indeed of the two false rogues, but they're not actually seen being roguishly plotting together all that often, their common knavery notwithstanding. When they appear together in the diary it's usually at different times of the day or with the rest of the herd. Maybe a search of Coventry's correspondence would unearth some sinister cabal with Pen? A quick search of the State Papers finds not a single letter from one to the other. They both have their troubles and their little secrets, but what again are they supposed to plot together about?

Anyway, better not to remind Sam of all the conspiracies around him, for today he seems melancholic enough, drifting from one vaguely hostile meeting he couldn't care less about, to another, to a failed dinner, to another meeting where we suspect he was gruff and ill-humored, to skulking half-hidden in the park at sunset like a vampyre. You can almost hear the raven overhead, crying "nevermore"! Is it the terrible besslessness of the times? The failed experiment in diary restructuring? Whatever disrupted the routine these past 10 days? Sam should have a draught of sack, or a tumble, or think of Descartes!

Stephane Chenard  •  Link

Warrant from Lord Arlington to Andrew Crooke (...) to search any house, shop, or printing room, supposed to contain scandalous or unlicensed books, or books imported contrary to law;
to seize them, make the presses unserviceable, and bring the offenders before himself, or a justice of peace (...)

Surely this warrant, while useful to have just in case, wasn't actually executed. It seems a recipe for absolute chaos - on the streets, in Parliament and in Lord Arlington's waiting room - for all the printers decamping to Rotterdam, and for England to revert wholly to handwriting.

Who was this Andrew Crooke anyway? Mr Google our learned bookseller says he is or was himself in the book trade, and only remembered for publishing Thomas Hobbes and Christiaan Huyghens. Is he now an enforcer for the printer's guild? How sad.

Tonyel  •  Link

Thence with Creed, thinking, but failed, of dining with Lord Crew, and so he and I to Hercules Pillars, and there dined,
So the habit of dropping in for lunch at one of the aristocratic houses did not always work?
" I'm sorry gentlemen, but every seat in the house is taken ( and the venison pie has all been consumed)"

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

"Hurry up, Creed, we'll be late." ... "Unhand that girl, Creed. We'll be late." ... "No, Creed, you don't need any more bands. We're going to be late." ... "For God's sake, Creed, put the melon down. We're going to be late." ... "What do you mean, you don't like the look of the horse, and won't get into the only available coach? Oh, I give up! You're paying for dinner."

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