Wednesday 19 May 1669

With my coach to St. James’s; and there finding the Duke of York gone to muster his men, in Hyde Park, I alone with my boy thither, and there saw more, walking out of my coach as other gentlemen did, of a soldier’s trade, than ever I did in my life: the men being mighty fine, and their Commanders, particularly the Duke of Monmouth; but me-thought their trade but very easy as to the mustering of their men, and the men but indifferently ready to perform what was commanded, in the handling of their arms. Here the news was first talked of Harry Killigrew’s being wounded in nine places last night, by footmen, in the highway, going from the Park in a hackney-coach towards Hammersmith, to his house at Turnham Greene: they being supposed to be my Lady Shrewsbury’s men, she being by, in her coach with six horses; upon an old grudge of his saying openly that he had lain with her. Thence by and by to White Hall, and there I waited upon the King and Queen all dinner-time, in the Queen’s lodgings, she being in her white pinner and apron, like a woman with child; and she seemed handsomer plain so, than dressed. And by and by, dinner done, I out, and to walk in the Gallery, for the Duke of York’s coming out; and there, meeting Mr. May, he took me down about four o’clock to Mr. Chevins’s lodgings, and all alone did get me a dish of cold chickens, and good wine; and I dined like a prince, being before very hungry and empty. By and by the Duke of York comes, and readily took me to his closet, and received my petition, and discoursed about my eyes, and pitied me, and with much kindness did give me his consent to be absent, and approved of my proposition to go into Holland to observe things there, of the Navy; but would first ask the King’s leave, which he anon did, and did tell me that the King would be a good master to me, these were his words, about my eyes, and do like of my going into Holland, but do advise that nobody should know of my going thither, but pretend that I did go into the country somewhere, which I liked well. Glad of this, I home, and thence took out my wife, and to Mr. Holliard’s about a swelling in her cheek, but he not at home, and so round by Islington and eat and drink, and so home, and after supper to bed. In discourse this afternoon, the Duke of York did tell me that he was the most amazed at one thing just now, that ever he was in his life, which was, that the Duke of Buckingham did just now come into the Queen’s bed-chamber, where the King was, and much mixed company, and among others, Tom Killigrew, the father of Harry, who was last night wounded so as to be in danger of death, and his man is quite dead; and [Buckingham] there in discourse did say that he had spoke with some one that was by (which all the world must know that it must be his whore, my Lady Shrewsbury), who says that they did not mean to hurt, but beat him, and that he did run first at them with his sword; so that he do hereby clearly discover that he knows who did it, and is of conspiracy with them, being of known conspiracy with her, which the Duke of York did seem to be pleased with, and said it might, perhaps, cost him his life in the House of Lords; and I find was mightily pleased with it, saying it was the most impudent thing, as well as the most foolish, that ever he knew man do in all his life.

18 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

John Evelyn's Diary

19th May, 1669. At a Council of the Royal Society our grant was finished, in which his Majesty gives us Chelsea College, and some land about it. It was ordered that five should be a quorum for a Council. The Vice- President was then sworn for the first time, and it was proposed how we should receive the Prince of Tuscany, who desired to visit the Society.

http://goo.gl/rjHJo

Carl in Boston   Link to this

do like of my going into Holland, but do advise that nobody should know of my going thither, but pretend that I did go into the country somewhere, which I liked well
His Masters were very wise to give Sam a cover story. If he had stood on the Dutch docks looking at the ships, openly and notoriously, he could have been arrested as a spy. As it is, he can look at the ships and see what he might (quite a bit, given 10 minutes and a knowing eye) and everyone can charge his absence to Business Research. Plagiarize, Plagiarize, Plagiarize, Let nothing evade your eyes, but always to call it (please), Research. I am going to miss this clever dog.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Does the Queen wears #2 of these and the apron: very maternal??

pin·ner
1.a person or thing that pins.
2.a headdress with a long hanging flap pinned on at each side.
3. a small apron fastened on by pins.
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/pinner

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Ooops: should be "Does the Queen wear...??"

Chris Squire   Link to this

‘pinner, n.3 In later use of sense 2 perhaps influenced by pinafore n.
. . 2. An apron, usually with a bib; a pinafore. Cf. pinny n. Now hist. and rare.
1674 T. Duffett Span. Rogue Prol., Thus Fools are caught, but the old crafty Sinner, Takes the sound Wench; though in Straw-Hat and Pinner.
1846 F. W. Fairholt Costume in Eng. Gloss., Pinner, an apron with a bib pinned in front of the dress. Its more modern name is pincloth and pinafore.’

‘pinafore, n. Etym: < pin v.2 + afore adv.... (Show More)
1. a. An apron, esp. one with a bib, originally pinned to the front of a dress; (later also) a collarless and sleeveless garment with fastenings at the back, worn (formerly esp. by young children) to protect the clothes from dirt. in pinafores: at a very young age, childish, inexperienced.
. . 1782 F. Burney Cecilia III. vi. x. 345 A pin-a-fore for Master Mortimer Delvile, lest he should daub his pappy when he is feeding him.’

‘pinny, n. colloq. and nursery. A pinafore; an apron, esp. one with a bib.
1850 J. Crawford Doric Lays 65 Sae proud about your braw new peenie.
. . 1990 Good Housek. May 237 (heading) As another barbecue season rolls in, Rosemary Stark ruminates on the annual resurgence of men in pinnies.’

‘pity, v.
1. trans. To feel pity for; to be sorry for. In modern use sometimes implying disdain or mild contempt for a person as intellectually or morally inferior . .
. . 1611 Bible (A.V.) Psalms ciii. 13 Like as a father pitieth his children, so the Lord pitieth them that feare him.
. . 1703 J. Gilbert Church of England's Wish 239 [They]‥should by no means insult over their Brethren overtaken in a Fault, but rather pity them and be concerned for them, having sorrow on their behalf.’ [OED]

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...but me-thought their trade but very easy as to the mustering of their men, and the men but indifferently ready to perform what was commanded, in the handling of their arms."

Poor Jamie's future in a nutshell.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Here the news was first talked of Harry Killigrew’s being wounded in nine places last night, by footmen, in the highway, going from the Park in a hackney-coach towards Hammersmith, to his house at Turnham Greene: they being supposed to be my Lady Shrewsbury’s men, she being by, in her coach with six horses; upon an old grudge of his saying openly that he had lain with her."

One can't help wondering if this inspired the beating scene in "Stage Beauty"?

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Sam Pepys, ace of spies...

"So we're going to Holland for part of our trip? The trip to France you promised me?!" Bess, glaring.

"You'll love Holland, sweetheart...Tulips, wooden shoes, windmills...It's where I got you that cunning little basket years ago."

"And I'm supposed to call myself Frau Schmidt? And claim we're from Bavaria?"

"Ja, mine dearest. And you'll get a chance to exercise your wonderful talent in sketching for the good of England."

"What's the reward for turning in English spies in Holland?"

"Less than what Uncle Wight would have given you...It'll be an adventure, Bessie. You and I, at no real risk, learning the secrets of the Dutch navy."

"You...Learning the secrets of the Dutch navy wives' drawers."

"We could keep a Diary together...Think of the 40 volume novel you could write based on its stirring tale of daring and rekindled romance."

"Hmmn...Will Betty Martin be joining us? She being so essential to your current Diary..." smile.

Uh...

Ruben   Link to this

Inspecting the Dutch Navy: considering the state of his eyes, he needs a Minox camera or better an Iphone...

Mary   Link to this

"but pretend that I did go into the country somewhere"

This could, of course, mean that Sam should not mention Holland at all, but should put it about that he had gone to some unnamed spot in the English countryside. Charles specifically states that "nobody should know of my going thither" (i.e. to Holland).

Any mention of such an English naval administrator travelling to Holland, whether he claimed to be going to observe the beauties of the Dutch countryside or not, would surely provoke comment and suspicion. London, as we have seen on so many occasions, is a hot-bed of rumour, gossip and news-mongering.

MINI SPOILER and, as we know from later sources, Sam and Elizabeth didn't go to Holland at all, but spent their time in France, returning to England via Belgium.

Mary   Link to this

"a swelling in her cheek"

Poor Elizabeth - post-extraction infection?

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"saw more, walking out of my coach as other gentlemen did, of a soldier’s trade, than ever I did in my life: the men being mighty fine, and their Commanders, particularly the Duke of Monmouth; but me-thought their trade but very easy as to the mustering of their men, and the men but indifferently ready to perform what was commanded, in the handling of their arms."

England is unready for a muster in the Park? Where is Albemarle (Monck)?

JWB   Link to this

This is way off topic, but a treat I just discovered, and one which I'd like to share with the history buffs who vist this diary before it ends. It's the recorded voice of Otto von Bismarck:

http://www.christopher-petersen.blogspot.com/20...

Dorothy Willis   Link to this

I wonder if the Queen's pinner, etc. might be the first appearance of the fashion for aprons I associate with the ladies of the reign of William and Mary.

Poor Bess! Anyone who has ever had a tooth extracted must feel for her!

And finally, the idea of what fun a diary of their time on the continent would be makes me even sadder to know the diary will end soon. It's not fair! I didn't find this site until about a year ago and missed the first years!

djc   Link to this

"as we know from later sources, Sam and Elizabeth didn’t go to Holland at all, but spent their time in France, returning to England via Belgium."

If it did happen it was secret so how would we know. And 'Belgium' is a modern creation. In Pepys' time the territory was part of the Hapsburg empire.

ticea   Link to this

re: Bess' "swelling in her cheek" - it's probably something called "dry socket" when the empty parts where the root of the tooth resided become infected. It's quite painful. Trust me, I know from personal experience.

AnnieC   Link to this

The Queen "being in her white pinner and apron, like a woman with child"
This sounds like standard pregnancy clothing, loose and comfortable, and adjustable as the baby bump grows.

Australian Susan   Link to this

D of Shrewsbury with her six horses - for a quick getaway - in town you would only need 2 or 4 horses. Or perhaps this is the equivalent of the Land Cruiser Pajero only used to take small children to expensive schools a short distance away?

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