Monday 5 April 1669

Up, and by coach, it being very cold, to White Hall, expecting a meeting of Tangier, but it did not. But, however, did wait there all the morning, and, among other things, I spent a little time with Creed walking in the garden, and talking about our Office, and Child’s coming in to be a Commissioner; and, being his friend, I did think he might do me a kindness to learn of him what the Duke of Buckingham and the faction do design touching me, and to instil good words concerning me, which he says, and I believe he will: and it is but necessary; for I have not a mind indeed at this time to be put out of my Office, if I can make any shift that is honourable to keep it; but I will not do it by deserting the Duke of York. At noon by appointment comes Mr. Sheres, and he and I to Unthanke’s, where my wife stays for us in our coach, and Betty Turner with her; and we to the Mulberry Garden, where Sheres is to treat us with a Spanish Olio, by a cook of his acquaintance that is there, that was with my Lord in Spain: and without any other company, he did do it, and mighty nobly; and the Olio was indeed a very noble dish, such as I never saw better, or any more of. This, and the discourse he did give us of Spain, and description of the Escuriall, was a fine treat. So we left other good things, that would keep till night, for a collation; and, with much content, took coach again, and went five or six miles towards Branford, the Prince of Tuscany, who comes into England only to spend money and see our country, comes into the town to-day, and is much expected; and we met him, but the coach passing by apace, we could not see much of him but he seems a very jolly and good comely man. By the way, we overtook Captain Ferrers upon his fine Spanish horse, and he is a fine horse indeed; but not so good, I think, as I have seen some. He did ride by us most of the way, and with us to the Park, and there left us, where we passed the evening, and meeting The. Turner, Talbot, W. Batelier, and his sister, in a coach, we anon took them with us to the Mulberry Garden; and there, after a walk, to supper upon what was left at noon; and very good; only Mr. Sheres being taken suddenly ill for a while, did spoil our mirth; but by and by was well again, and we mighty merry: and so broke up, and left him at Charing Cross, and so calling only at my cozen Turner’s, away home, mightily pleased with the day’s work, and this day come another new mayd, for a middle mayd, but her name I know not yet; and, for a cookmaid, we have, ever since Bridget went, used a blackmoore of Mr. Batelier’s, Doll, who dresses our meat mighty well, and we mightily pleased with her. So by and by to bed.

10 Annotations

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...only Mr. Sheres being taken suddenly ill for a while, did spoil our mirth..." I guess it would having just eaten his Spanish Olio.

What a pity it was "Doll" and not "Elisabeth" for the black cookmaid.

"Thanks for the loan of Doll, Will...I'm sure she'll be a lifesaver."

"Right...No problem, Mr. Pepys...But..."

"Will? I trust you don't think I'll treat her any differently from my other female servants."

"Uh...I was rather hoping for better, Mr. Pepys. It's just...Doll's had to become very skilled at dealing with troublesome employers."

"Will? How...Troublesome? And how...Skilled?"

"You know the way you always are, Mr. Pepys?"

"Hmmn?"

"Don't be that way. At least not with Doll..."

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"a blackmoore of Mr. Batelier’s, Doll, who dresses our meat mighty well, and we mightily pleased with her."

L&M note Negro servants were not uncommonly employed in London.
Bridget had left on 29 March.

Jesse   Link to this

"that was with my Lord in Spain"

Sir Edward I presume - let's not deny him his link.

Mary   Link to this

Branford.

All jolly interesting about stockings, but why does "Branford" have a link to "stockings"?

I assume that Branford = Brentford, Middlesex. Not, so far as I recall, a historic centre of stocking manufacture, though in the second half of the 20th century it boasted a company called "Brentford Nylons" that sold not stockings but cheap sheets, blankets, ready-made curtains etc.

Tony Eldridge   Link to this

Further to yesterday's, and the 2005, comments about the working week, I note that Sam isn't afraid of being seen enjoying himself all Monday afternoon even though he's a little worried about keeping his job.

Presumably, once you reached a certain station in life you could set your own hours as long as the work was done.

Unlurking...   Link to this

...for today, just to express my sincere gratitude to everyone who has made this possible - Phil Gyford, all the annotators, and, of course, the immortal Pepys. Like so many (all?) of you, I will miss my daily fix of Sam and his world when the diary ends. Thanks to all for making this such an enjoyable and enriching experience.
Steve in Baltimore

JWB   Link to this

"...being his friend, I did think he might do me a kindness..."

Just last summer: "...Creed with me, who I do really begin to hate, and do use him with some reservedness..."
http://www.pepysdiary.com/archive/1668/07

But that was before he became "Cozin Creed" in the fall when he married into Sandwich clan.

Teresa Forster   Link to this

" I have not a mind indeed at this time to be put out of my Office, if I can make any shift that is honourable to keep it; but I will not do it by deserting the Duke of York. "

Good for you, Sam.

Australian Susan   Link to this

"... Captain Ferrers upon his fine Spanish horse, and he is a fine horse indeed; ..." Spain took equestrianism much more seriously than the Brits at that time, so this probably would have been a fine animal indeed. This tradition lives on in the Spanish Riding School at Vienna.

Sam vows here to stick by the D of Y, which he did and of course eventually this did cost him his job post 1685.

Phil Gyford   Link to this

Thanks for the corrections folks - I've corrected the link to Branford from pointing to Stockings (a surreal but surprisingly small numerical error) and added a link from "my Lord".

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