Sunday 4 April 1669

(Lord’s day). Up, and to church, where Alderman Backewell’s wife, by my invitation with my head, come up with her mother, and sat with us, and after sermon I did walk with them home, and there left them, and home to dinner, and after dinner with Sir J. Minnes and T. Middleton to White Hall, by appointment; and at my Lord Arlington’s the Office did attend the King and Cabal, to discourse the further quantity of victuals fit to be declared for, which was 2,000 men for six months; and so without more ado or stay, there, hearing no news but that Sir Thomas Allen is to be expected every hour at home with his fleete, or news of his being gone back to Algier, and so home, where got my wife to read to me; and so after supper to bed. The Queen-Mother hath been of late mighty ill, and some fears of her death.

8 Annotations

Paul Chapin   Link to this

"my invitation with my head"
I take this to mean that Sam made eye contact with her, then jerked his head back slightly in a "come here" gesture.

Also, I doubt (in the modern sense) that Mrs. Backwell's mother was also named Mrs. Backwell, as the rollover suggests.

Jenny   Link to this

"invitation with my head" - another example which brings history to life. 400 (doing the math and not sure I have it right lol) years ago Sam made a motion with his head which we all still make today.

Allen Appel   Link to this

I've noticed a number of times that Sam routinely does business on a Sunday. Was this common throughout society? And was there a specific time when businesses and certainly government offices shut down on a Sunday?

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"400 (doing the math and not sure I have it right lol) years ag"

Jenny, it's 343 years ago every day (e.g. 4 April, 343 years ago today BST).

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"The Queen-Mother hath been of late mighty ill, and some fears of her death."

"She had intended to remain in England for the rest of her life, but by 1665 was suffering badly from bronchitis, which she blamed on the damp British weather. Henrietta travelled back to France the same year, taking residence at the Hôtel de la Bazinière, the present Hôtel de Chimay in Paris. In August 1669, she saw the birth of her granddaughter Anne Marie d'Orléans; Anne Marie was the maternal grandmother of Louis XV making Henrietta Maria an ancestor of most of today's royal families. Shortly afterwards, she died at the château de Colombes, near Paris, having taken an excessive quantity of opiates as a painkiller. " http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/1399/

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"Sam routinely does business on a Sunday. Was this common throughout society? And was there a specific time when businesses and certainly government offices shut down on a Sunday?"

Puzzling matters for sure; see this discussion of the work week and weekend:
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1662/07/12/#c32924
.

Allen Appel   Link to this

I had to laugh. Check out Terry's diary link in reference to my question, it shows the usual brilliance of the Pepys commenters. What am I I gonna do for fascinating, intelligent input every day of the week when Sam's poor eyes cause him to hang up his pen. I'm doomed!

nix   Link to this

The Oxford DNB says that Backwell's second wife -- "the one who appears in Pepys' Diary -- was the daughter of Richard Leigh or Lyse, so I assume that her mother would have gone by that name.

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