Monday 12 October 1668

Up, and with Mr. Turner by water to White Hall, there to think to enquire when the Duke of York will be in town, in order to Mr. Turner’s going down to Audley Ends about his place; and here I met in St. James’s Park with one that told us that the Duke of York would be in town to-morrow, and so Turner parted and went home, and I also did stop my intentions of going to the Court, also this day, about securing Mr. Turner’s place of Petty-purveyor to Mr. Hater. So I to my Lord Brouncker’s, thinking to have gone and spoke to him about it, but he is gone out to town till night, and so, meeting a gentleman of my Lord Middleton’s looking for me about the payment of the 1000l. lately ordered to his Lord, in advance of his pay, which shall arise upon his going Governor to Tangier, I did go to his Lord’s lodgings, and there spoke the first time with him, and find him a shrewd man, but a drinking man, I think, as the world says; but a man that hath seen much of the world, and is a Scot. I offered him my service, though I can do him little; but he sends his man home with me, where I made him stay, till I had gone to Sir W. Pen, to bespeak him about Mr. Hater, who, contrary to my fears, did appear very friendly, to my great content; for I was afraid of his appearing for his man Burroughs. But he did not; but did declare to me afterwards his intentions to desire an excuse in his own business, to be eased of the business of the Comptroller, his health not giving him power to stay always in town, but he must go into the country. I did say little to him but compliment, having no leisure to think of his business, or any man’s but my own, and so away and home, where I find Sir H. Cholmly come to town; and is come hither to see me: and he is a man that I love mightily, as being, of a gentleman, the most industrious that ever I saw. He staid with me awhile talking, and telling me his obligations to my Lord Sandwich, which I was glad of; and that the Duke of Buckingham is now chief of all men in this kingdom, which I knew before; and that he do think the Parliament will hardly ever meet again; which is a great many men’s thoughts, and I shall not be sorry for it. He being gone, I with my Lord Middleton’s servant to Mr. Colvill’s, but he was not in town, and so he parted, and I home, and there to dinner, and Mr. Pelling with us; and thence my wife and Mercer, and W. Hewer and Deb., to the King’s playhouse, and I afterwards by water with them, and there we did hear the Eunuch (who, it seems, is a Frenchman, but long bred in Italy) sing, which I seemed to take as new to me, though I saw him on Saturday last, but said nothing of it; but such action and singing I could never have imagined to have heard, and do make good whatever Tom Hill used to tell me. Here we met with Mr. Batelier and his sister, and so they home with us in two coaches, and there at my house staid and supped, and this night my bookseller Shrewsbury comes, and brings my books of Martyrs, and I did pay him for them, and did this night make the young women before supper to open all the volumes for me. So to supper, and after supper to read a ridiculous nonsensical book set out by Will. Pen, for the Quakers; but so full of nothing but nonsense, that I was ashamed to read in it. So they gone, we to bed.

8 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"a ridiculous nonsensical book set out by Will. Pen, for the Quakers "

*Truth exalted; in a short, but sure testimony against all those religions, faiths, and vvorships that have been formed and followed in the darkness of apostacy.--- And for that glorious light which is now risen, and shines forth in the life and doctrine of the despised Quakers, as the alone good old way of life and salvation. Presented to princes, priests, and people, that they may repent, believe, and obey.* By William Penn the younger, whom divine love constrains in a holy contempt to trample on Egypts glory, not fearing the Kings wrath, having beheld the magisty [sic] of him who is invisible
London : printed [by John Darby], in the year, 1668
http://goo.gl/l9df5

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Penn's pamphlet (and the aftermath Pepys will not report)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Penn#Perse...

Andrew Hamilton   Link to this

"he do think the Parliament will hardly ever meet again; which is a great many men’s thoughts, and I shall not be sorry for it."

That dratted Parliament, always prying and poking and making difficulties about money. Some contemporary figures of the American executive have been heard expressing similar feelings.

Mary   Link to this

"to open all the volumes for me"

i.e. Sam got them to cut the uncut pages.

andy   Link to this

to open all the volumes for me

My former English teacher taught me 45 years ago to prepare modern paperbacks for reading.

You place the spine on the table/hard surface then open the soft covers to left and right, pressing the edges firmly, running your index finger down each side, to establish the hinges.

Then from left and right alternately you open about ten pages and press firmly on the edge of the topmost page, from the top of the page (top right then top left), again running your index finger firmly down the edge, and moving steadily, growing each pile of pages left and right.

Eventually left and right meet in a single page riding erect from the centre of the spine. That page he said should be the middle page number "if you have done it correctly".

Of course you can have a sneak peek at the prose while you do this.

It's like making love for the first time, and you can't do it with e-books.

I hope Sam had the same pleasure!

JWB   Link to this

"Truth Exaulted....

'The select works of William Penn.... (Google eBook), p1

http://books.google.com/books/about/The_select_...

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Ahhhhh..."

'Sam'l? What's the...?"

Shaking finger pointing to page...

"'dedicated to my dear friend, Samuel Pepys...' Oh, Sam'l that's so sweet of Will. Will, Sam'l obviously is just overwhelmed by your thoughtfulness." patting choking Pepys on back. "And such a fine title, 'Truth Exalted'..."

"Merci, madame..." Will Jr., gracious bow.

Better you than me...You filling the boy's fool head with that 'tolerance' nonsense...Admiral Sir Will beside him, smiling at Sam.

***

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...a gentleman of my Lord Middleton’s looking for me about the payment of the 1000l. lately ordered to his Lord, in advance of his pay, which shall arise upon his going Governor to Tangier, I did go to his Lord’s lodgings, and there spoke the first time with him, and find him a shrewd man, but a drinking man, I think, as the world says; but a man that hath seen much of the world, and is a Scot."

One might read a lamentable stereotype in this...

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